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7

TL;DR: The provided profile is used in profiles.clj as an alternative to the dev profile, because if dev is used there it would overwrite the entire dev profile specified in project.clj. The most common use of :provided is to specify dependencies that should be available during jar creation, but will be provided by the runtime environment. But I think ...


5

You can define project-specific aliases, e.g.: :aliases {"launch" ["run" "-m" "myproject.main"] ;; Values from the project map can be spliced into the arguments ;; using :project/key keywords. "launch-version" ["run" "-m" "myproject.main" :project/version] "dumbrepl" ["trampoline" "run" "-m" ...


4

You need both :aot (ahead-of-time compilation) and :omit-source. When :aot is not used (that's the default), clojure will try to compile the classes on the fly from the sources in the jar, so it needs the sources. You can use :aot :all, or :aot [my.awesome.api] if you are going to expose just your api ns. So your project.clj will look like: (defproject ...


3

Apart from the question if conditional compilation is the best approach here, it is not difficult to compile files conditionally with leiningen: put the files you want to compile conditionally in a folder different than src/clj, and define it as a source folder in a profile: :profiles { :native {:source-paths ["src/native/clj/"]} :mock ...


3

The :provided profile is used to specify dependencies that should be available during jar creation, but not propagated to other code that depends on your project. These are dependencies that the project assumes will be provided by whatever environment the jar is used in, but are needed during the development of the project. This is often used for ...


3

Make sure the directory ~/.lein is owned by you by running ls -ld .lein, not by root. If it is not, then run sudo chown -R <user> ~/.lein.


3

You have this error: Unable to resolve symbol: some-> some-> has been added in clojure 1.5 Your project.clj, which you wrote in a comment (you should've added to question by editing it... leaving it into the comments is almost unreadable and hostile to people that might be willing to help you) is: (defproject sisaw "0.1.0-SNAPSHOT" :description ...


2

In theory, you could AOT-compile Clojure source code to Java bytecode, and then use gcj to compile this byte code to native machine code. In practice, I would not expect this to work; gcj has severe limitations that prevent its use for most modern Java applications. Specifically, its support for language features stops at Java 1.2 (Clojure requires Java ...


1

You are probably looking for vim-slime plugin. I hope this blog post can help.


1

I found a Leiningen profile in $HOME/.lein/profiles.clj For me on Windows, $HOME was D:\Users\carl . More generally, it's the directory Windows will (usually) dump you in if you start the shell using CMD . This contained: {:user { :java-cmd "F:\\JDK8\\bin\\java.exe" :plugins [ ] } } ...which I was able to change to good effect.


1

The clojure compiler takes in source "expressions", usually from a file, and produces JVM bytecode. This bytecode is then compiled JIT style to machine code by the JVM. the clojure compiler and GCJ are both compilers, though for different languages, so it does not make sense to talk about chaining one after the other. The clojure compiler does not produce ...


1

Warning saying you have to use nREPL 0.2.7+ CIDER currently requires at least nREPL 0.2.7 to work properly (there were some nasty bugs in 0.2.6). Unfortunately the latest leiningen (2.5.1) pulls in exactly 0.2.6, so you if you're a lein user you'll have to do a bit of manual work. Just add this to your profiles.clj: {:user {:dependencies ...


1

You could always run lein repl from the context of a project that uses Clojure 1.7. (defproject sandbox "0.1.0-SNAPSHOT" :description "A project to run lein repl with a specific clojure version" :dependencies [[org.clojure/clojure "1.7.0-RC1"]])



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