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181

There are at least 4 libraries that I am aware of providing lenses. The notion of a lens is that it provides something isomorphic to data Lens a b = Lens (a -> b) (b -> a -> a) providing two functions: a getter, and a setter get (Lens g _) = g put (Lens _ s) = s subject to three laws: First, that if you put something, you can get it back ...


49

A lens consists of two functions, a getter and a setter: data Lens a b = Lens { getter :: a -> b, setter :: b -> a -> a } For example, we might have lenses for the first and second parts of a pair: fstLens :: Lens (a, b) a fstLens = Lens fst $ \x (a, b) -> (x, b) sndLens :: Lens (a, b) b sndLens = Lens snd $ \x (a, b) -> (a, x) The real ...


45

They offer a clean abstraction over data updates, and are never really "needed." They just let you reason about a problem in a different way. In some imperative/"object-oriented" programming languages like C, you have the familiar concept of some collection of values (let's call them "structs") and ways to label each value in the collection (the labels are ...


34

The Haddocks are the best in-depth resource. They contain everything, but they might be a bit hard to navigate at first. Just browse around the different modules and make mental notes on what's where, and you'll start to find your way around soon. The diagram you link to is also a very good map of the modules. However, since you say you don't understand the ...


25

Lenses form an alternative to using direct closures over data constructors. Lenses therefore have approximately the same caveats as using functions and data constructors directly. Some of the cons because of this: Every time you modify a lens, you might potentially cause a lot of objects to be (re)created. For example, if you have this data structure: A ...


20

The following will work if you only want a getter over multiple fields. First, you need to make Accessor from lens an instance of Monoid (that instance is in in HEAD, but not released yet already defined in lens >= 4, so you only need to define the instance if you're working with an old version of the library). import Data.Monoid import Control.Lens ...


19

If you have a Traversal and you want to get a Maybe for the first element, you can just use headOf instead of view, i.e. viewPlayerLocation :: World -> PlayerId -> Maybe RoomId viewPlayerLocation world playerId = headOf (worldPlayers.at playerId.traverse.playerLocation) world The infix version of headOf is called ^?. You can also use toListOf to ...


15

Using untainted from the Settable type class in Control.Lens.Internal.Setter, it is possible to combine two setters, but the result will also only be a setter and not a getter. import Control.Lens.Internal.Setter -- (&&&) is already taken by Control.Arrow (~&~) :: (Settable f) => (c -> d -> f a) -> (c -> a -> t) -> c ...


15

edit: I normally experiment in ghci to understand new code so for those like myself I have created a School of Haskell post/page which comes with the below examples but they are editable and runnable. Think this examples will answer your questions but for expediency I am going to modify a different node. My knowledge of the zipper functions in the lens ...


13

You can't* turn (!!) into any lens-like thing other than a Getter -- but there's a function to do this sort of thing: ix, for accessing things at indices. It's actually a Traversal, not a Lens -- which, here, just means that it can fail (if the index is out of bounds) -- but as long as the index is in the list, it'll work. There's another problem, though -- ...


13

Control.Lens is almost certainly what you want. Data.Lens came first, and is simpler, but Control.Lens has many advantages, and is being actively developed. Other than lenses, Control.Lens has many related types, like traversals (a traversal is like a lens that can refer to n values instead of just one), folds, read/modify-only lenses, indexed lenses, ...


12

Lenses provide convenient ways to edit data structures, in a uniform, compositional way. Many programs are built around the following operations: viewing a component of a (possibly nested) data structure updating fields of (possibly nested) data structures Lenses provide language support for viewing and editing structures in a way that ensures your ...


12

See the answer to question lenses, fclabels, data-accessor - which library for structure access and mutation is better - it has a very clear explanation on lenses. Also, the documentation for the Data.Lenses and fclabel libraries give some good examples of them being used.


12

It doesn't do anything special. The generated lens is named type and funnily enough, GHC appears to be totally cool with this. You can even use it if you use the fully qualified name: {-# LANGUAGE TemplateHaskell #-} module Foo where import Control.Lens data Bar = Bar { _type :: String } deriving Show $(makeLenses ''Bar) > :l Foo > :t ...


12

You probably want either (^?), or maybe (^..) (non-operator names: preview, toListOf). When you have a Lens (or a Getter, Iso, Equality, etc.), it always refers to exactly one item. So you can use plain old (^.) (non-operator name: view). When you have have a Traversal (or a Fold, Prism, etc.), it can refer to 0-or-more items. Therefore there must be a way ...


12

The right reading of r ^. responseStatus . statusCode is r ^. (responseStatus . statusCode). This is only natural, since function composition returns a function when applied to two arguments, thus (r ^. responseStatus) . statusCode must return a function, as opposed to any value that could be printed out. This still leaves open the question why lenses ...


11

Looking at the code, it seems pretty straightforward. LensRules have a function lensField :: String -> Maybe String (which either gives the name for a lens or fails). So you can make a function like myMakeLenses = makeLensesWith $ lensRules & lensField .~ (\name -> Just (name ++ "L")) and use that instead of makeLenses. Of course you could ...


11

You'll want to use a Prism to (maybe) go into the the Just branch. >>> let config' = config & foo . _Just .~ (+1) in config' ^. foo Just 2 And then this Prism will compose just the same as other lenses, forming Traversals. foo . _Just . bar . _Bar :: Traversal' Config Int Take a look at some tutorials I wrote on lens that spend a ...


11

shachaf's answer doesn't work with lenses 4.4+ which changed the template-haskell related APIs. Here is the implementation that works with those versions: import Language.Haskell.TH myMakeLenses :: Name -> DecsQ myMakeLenses = makeLensesWith $ lensRules & lensField .~ \_ _ name -> [TopName (mkName $ nameBase name ++ "L")] (this is 4.5+, in ...


10

One clean way to tackle this problem is to think of your merge operation as something like addition given the right set of monoid instances. You can see my answer here for a solution to a very similar problem, but the solution is even easier now thanks to the efforts of the typelevel team. First for the case classes: case class Foo(fooPropA: Option[String], ...


10

As the other answers already explain, the issue is that view expects something that works for any Functor f, but traverse only works if f is also Applicative (and there are functors which are not applicative). In lens, the problem is solved by making the type of view not take a Rank2 argument (in fact, most functions in lens don't use the Lens type ...


10

Use folded: Prelude Control.Lens> [[0, 1], [4, 5], [9, 1]] ^.. folded . ix 0 [0,4,9] Works on any Foldable. Also, if you plan to always extract the first element, perhaps it would be clearer to use the _head traversal from Control.Lens.Cons instead of ix. [[0, 1], [4, 5], [9, 1]] ^.. folded . _head


10

A lens isn't, in fact, "a getter and a setter", it just happens to be isomorphic to such a pair. So you can't just export one of them, rather you have to define something new and export that. Fortunately, this is extremely simple: data Counter = Counter { _count' :: Int } deriving (Eq) makeLenses ''Counter count :: Getter Counter Int count = count'


10

We need reified lenses because Haskell's type system is predicative. I don't know the technical details of exactly what that means, but it prohibits types like [Lens s t a b] For some purposes, it's acceptable to use Functor f => [(a -> f b) -> s -> f t] instead, but when you reach into that, you don't get a Lens; you get a LensLike ...


10

To describe partial lenses—which I will henceforth call, according to the Haskell lens nomenclature, prisms (excepting that they're not! See the comment by Ørjan)—I'd like to begin by taking a different look at lenses themselves. A lens Lens s a indicates that given an s we can "focus" on a subcomponent of s at type a, viewing it, replacing it, and (if we ...


10

You can use either of Prelude Control.Lens> [[0, 1], [4, 5], [9, 1]] & each %~ (^?! ix 0) [0,4,9] Prelude Control.Lens> [[0, 1], [4, 5], [9, 1]] ^.. each . ix 0 [0,4,9] The first corresponds to precisely what you wrote, using the unsafe (^?!) operator, which means that it can give an error. The second is safer by leaving out empty lists. They ...


10

You can use a chain of Lenses and Traversals to access the inner header value directly and update it. put $ mail & headers . at header ?~ value Note that (?~) is just shorthand for \lens value -> lens .~ Just value. The Just is needed to indicate to the at lens that we want to insert a value if it doesn't exist already. If mail in the first line ...


9

Your solution is pretty much what the ListLike package does. There's also the additional package listlike-instances which adds instances for Text and Vector.


9

You're going to need to help the compiler out a bit. Either of the following would do: (fst andThen snd[Int, Int]).set(((1, 2), 3), 9) or: (fst[(Int, Int), Int] andThen snd).set(((1, 2), 3), 9) My guess would be that Edward Kmett glossed over this issue in the talk because it's not really relevant to his subject—it's just one of the (annoying) quirks ...


9

Because ix n can fail (ex: n >= length list) you need a clean way to fail. The clean failure of choice is the mempty element from Monoid. So the question that immediately arises is if your type can't be a Monoid then how would you like this code to fail? I suggest you use ^? instead of ^., thereby reusing the Monoid named Maybe: *Main> o ^? inners ...



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