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81

let creates a lexically scoped immutable alias for some value. binding creates a dynamically scoped binding for some Var. Dynamic binding means that the code inside your binding form and any code which that code calls (even if not in the local lexical scope) will see the new binding. Given: user> (def ^:dynamic x 0) #'user/x binding actually ...


42

Generally speaking, why does it exist? It exists for autoboxing as Google suggests. If you have code like this: Integer foo = 0; foo++; Java internally makes this into this helper expression: Integer foo = 0; let int foo_helper = foo.intValue() in foo_helper++; Source: http://bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=6614974 That expression ...


42

Short answer: Use let without in in the body of a do-block, and in the part after the | in a list comprehension. Anywhere else, use let ... in .... The keyword let is used in three ways in Haskell. The first form is a let-expression. let variable = expression in expression This can be used wherever an expression is allowed, e.g. > (let x = 2 in ...


37

The problem is that your use of let is wrong. Let works like this: (let [identifier (expr)]) So your example should be something like this: (let [s (Scanner. "a b c")] (exprs)) You can only use the lexical bindings made with let within the scope of let (the opening and closing parens). Let just creates a set of lexical bindings. I use def for making ...


36

def defines a toplevel var, even if you use it in a function or inner loop of some code. What you get in let are not vars. Per the documentation for let: Locals created with let are not variables. Once created their values never change! (Emphasis not mine.) You don't need mutable state for your example here; you could use loop and recur. (loop [x ...


26

A let is a lambda. E.g. (let ((x 1)) body) can be translated into ((lambda (x) body) 1) Furthermore, in Scheme all control and environment structures can be represented by lambda expressions and applications of lambdas. So, lambda is strictly more powerful than let and forms the basis of many of the interesting constructs found in Scheme. ...


25

Mostly readability, I imagine. Whenever bindings are needed in Clojure, a vector is pretty consistently used. A lot of people agree that vectors for bindings make things flow better, and make it easier to discern what the bindings are and what the running code is. Just for fun: user=> (defmacro list-let [bindings & body] `(let ~(vec bindings) ...


21

1: The problem in the example f :: State s a f = State $ \x -> y where y = ... x ... is the parameter x. Things in the where clause can refer only to the parameters of the function f (there are none) and things in outer scopes. 2: To use a where in the first example, you can introduce a second named function that takes the x as a parameter, like ...


20

Yes, it has entirely to do with browser support. Currently only Firefox implements it (since it's part of their superset of ECMAScript). But it is coming in ES6, so there's hope... I doubt it could be said that there are many benefits to var over let given that both are supported. I think the mantra is going to be "let is the new var"


19

While programming in GHCi, you're like programming in IO monad with do syntax, so for example you can directly call a function with type of IO a, or use monadic bind syntax like r <- someIOFun. let is also a part of do so you can also use this. I think it's being desugared into let .. in <rest of the computation>, so for example when you do this: ...


16

Simply put, it's scoped "from where it's written until the end of the do". Note that within a do statement, let is handled differently. According to http://www.haskell.org/haskellwiki/Monads_as_computation#Do_notation , it is interpreted as follows: do { let <decls> ; <stmts> } = let <decls> in do { <stmts> }


15

While there is the technical difference with respect to guards that ephemient pointed out, there is also a conceptual difference in whether you want to put the main formula upfront with extra variables defined below (where) or whether you want to define everything upfront and put the formula below (let). Each style has a different emphasis and you see both ...


15

LET is not "make a lexical binding in the current scope", but "make a new lexical scope with the following bindings". (let [s (foo whatever)] ;; s is bound here ) ;; but not here (def s (foo whatever)) ;; s is bound here


14

So, you can use the extension method syntax, which would involve one lambda expression more than you are currently using. There is no let, you just use a multi-line lambda and declare a variable: var results = Stores.Where(store => { var averagePrice = store.Sales.Average(s => s.Price); return averagePrice > 250 && averagePrice ...


14

According to the Haskell report, section 3.12: Let expressions have the general form let { d1 ; … ; dn } in e, and introduce a nested, lexically-scoped, mutually-recursive list of declarations (let is often called letrec in other languages). The scope of the declarations is the expression e and the right hand side of the declarations. (emphasis mine) ...


14

let-bound variables are stored as final local values on the stack. Since they are final, they can be bound into closures if needed (this is analogous how you can use a final local variable in an anonymous inner class in Java). Under the hood, the JVM copies the value into the object that represents the closure (where it is stored as a final field). As a ...


13

This is an idiom from Scheme. In many Scheme implementations, square brackets can be used interchangeably with round parentheses in list literals. In those Scheme implementations, square brackets are often used to distinguish parameter lists, argument lists and bindings from S-expressions or data lists. In Clojure, parentheses and brackets mean different ...


12

Because it's convenient and saves indentation. Furthermore, the accumulator conceptually belongs to the loop, so why not put it there?


12

def is a special form at the compiler level: it makes a Var. def has to be available and usable before destructuring is available. You see something similar with let*, a compiler primitive that supports no destructuring: then after several thousand lines in clojure/core.clj the language is finally powerful enough to provide a version of let with ...


12

This is pretty crazily written code. Let's try to resolve it piece by piece. First of all, t1 is a tuple of type (a,b,c). Let's write t1 = (x,y,z) and try to figure things out. It's pretty clear that a is String, and x is "p1". The second component is ((take 2) . tail) mnr, which is take 2 [1,2,3,4,5,6], which is [1,2]. So b is [Int], and y is [1,2]. Makes ...


11

Why are Clojure's let and for both monads? They aren't. Clojure's let and for are not monads because they do not fully expose their Monadic common structure. They are more like monads in a sugary prison. What are monads? In Clojure parlance, a monad could be described as reification of a Monad protocol whose functions are expected to behave with each ...


11

The interpreter always outputs the value of the last expression. print also returns the parameter as a value, "Hi!" in your case. That's why you see it twice. (print "Hi!") will give the same result.


11

Clojure tries very hard to be consistent. There is no technical reason with a list form could not have been used in let, fn, with-open, etc... In fact, you can create your own my-let easily enough that uses one instead. However, aside from standing out visibly, the vector is used consistently across forms to mean "here are some bindings". You should ...


11

in the non-recursive case, let is a restructuring of lambda. def firstFn : Int = 42 def secondFn(b : Int) : Long = 42 def thirdFn(x : Int, y : Long, z : Long) : Long = x + y + z def let[A, B](x : A)(f : A => B) : B = f(x) def calculate(a: Long) = let(firstFn){first => let(secondFn(first)){second => thirdFn(first, second, second + a)}} Of ...


10

The general form for binding identifier values in F# is let pattern = expression In this case, the pattern is "line1, line2", which is a tuple pattern, it will expect to bind to a 2-tuple of values and assign the names "line1" and "line2" to those two values. The expression is the next 4 lines. Inside that expression there are local variables. They ...


10

In the second example, the z = ... isn't aligned with the y = .... In a let block, every definition has to be aligned. I suspect you're indenting with tab characters, and have your editor set to display tabs as less than 8 spaces, making it look like it's aligned to you. You should replace the tab with spaces, and preferably set your editor to expand tabs ...


10

The message return type is merely a string. In the *Messages* buffer you see both the return value of message (displayed in quotes in the echo area by the evaluating command), and the unquoted string displayed in the echo area by message itself. The first result was not a lambda, but a string with text properties. In Emacs, the printable representation of ...


10

You have to indent the guards past the declaration of your function: myMax a b = a + b - myMin a b where myMin x y -- Also, use different variable names here to avoid conflicts | x < y = x | otherwise = y Or as myMax a b = let myMin x y | x < y = x | otherwise = y in a + b - myMin ...


10

Update 2: I've realized that my original answer was correct and rolled back to the original, but will add some clarifying notes. In Scheme, let* allows later values to depend on earlier ones. So for instance, you can write (in the usual syntax): (let* ((foo 3) (bar (+ foo 1)) (baz (* bar 2))) (* foo bar baz)) which binds foo to 3, bar to ...


9

Syntactically you can easily imagine a language without let. Immediately, we can produce this in Haskell by simply relying on where if we wanted. Beyond that are many possible syntaxes. Semantically, you might think that let could translate away to something like this let x = e in g ==> (\x -> g) e and, indeed, at runtime these two ...



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