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137

Since R version 2.12, there's a droplevels() function. levels(droplevels(subdf$letters))


110

All you should have to do is to apply factor() to your variable again after subsetting: > subdf$letters [1] a b c Levels: a b c d e subdf$letters <- factor(subdf$letters) > subdf$letters [1] a b c Levels: a b c EDIT From the factor page example: factor(ff) # drops the levels that do not occur For dropping levels from all factor columns ...


62

The answers here are good, but they are missing an important point. Let me try and describe it. R is a functional language and does not like to mutate its objects. But it does allow assignment statements, using replacement functions: levels(x) <- y is equivalent to x <- `levels<-`(x, y) The trick is, this rewriting is done by <-; it is not ...


44

Use the levels argument of factor: > df <- data.frame(f = 1:4, g = letters[1:4]) > df f g 1 1 a 2 2 b 3 3 c 4 4 d > levels(df$g) [1] "a" "b" "c" "d" > df$g <- factor(df$g, levels = letters[4:1]) > levels(df$g) [1] "d" "c" "b" "a" > df f g 1 1 a 2 2 b 3 3 c 4 4 d


26

No sorcery, that's just how (sub)assignment functions are defined. levels<- is a little different because it is a primitive to (sub)assign the attributes of a factor, not the elements themselves. There are plenty of examples of this type of function: `<-` # assignment `[<-` # sub-assignment `[<-.data.frame` # ...


26

The reason for that "magic" is that the "assignment" form must have a real variable to work on. And the factor(dat$product) wasn't assigned to anything. # This works since its done in several steps x <- factor(dat$product) levels(x) <- list(Tylenol=1:3, Advil=4:6, Bayer=7:9, Generic=10:12) x # This doesn't work although it's the "same" thing: ...


23

It is a known issue, and one possible remedy is provided by drop.levels() in the gdata package where your example becomes > drop.levels(subdf) letters numbers 1 a 1 2 b 2 3 c 3 > levels(drop.levels(subdf)$letters) [1] "a" "b" "c" There is also the dropUnusedLevels function in the Hmisc package. However, it only ...


19

I think the way to think about the difference between labels and levels (ignoring the labels() function that Tommy describes in his answer) is that levels is intended to tell R which values to look for in the input (x) and what order to use in the levels of the resulting factor object, and labels is to change the values of the levels after the input has been ...


14

If you don't want this behaviour, don't use factors, use character vectors instead. I think this makes more sense than patching things up afterwards. Try the following before loading your data with read.table or read.csv: options(stringsAsFactors = FALSE) The disadvantage is that you're restricted to alphabetical ordering. (reorder is your friend for ...


13

The labels function sounds like the perfect fit for getting the labels of a factor. ...but the labels function has nothing to do with factors! It is used as a generic way of getting something to "label" an object. For atomic vectors, this would be the names. But if there are no names, the labels function returns the element indices coerced to strings - ...


13

For user-code I do wonder why such language manipulations are used so? You ask what magic is this and others have pointed out that you are calling the replacement function that has the name levels<-. For most people this is magic and really the intended use is levels(foo) <- bar. The use-case you show is different because product doesn't exist in the ...


10

some more, just for the record library(gdata) df$letters <- reorder(df$letters, new.order=letters[4:1]) library(Hmisc) df$letters <- reorder.factor(df$letters, letters[4:1]) You may also find useful Relevel and combine_factor.


9

There's a recently added function in R for this: y <- droplevels(y)


8

Does this do what you want? ggplot(df, aes(x=type)) + geom_bar() + scale_x_discrete(drop=FALSE)


7

Here is one way to write the function depth = lambda L: isinstance(L, list) and max(map(depth, L))+1 I think the idea you are missing is to use max()


6

probably walk.df is a subset of the factor variable with 3 levels. say, a<-factor(1:3) b<-a[1:2] then b has 3 levels. A easy way to drop extra level is: b<-a[1:2, drop=T] or if you cannot access the original variable, b<-factor(b)


6

Here's another way, which I believe is equivalent to the factor(..) approach: > df <- data.frame(let=letters[1:5], num=1:5) > subdf <- df[df$num <= 3, ] > subdf$let <- subdf$let[ , drop=TRUE] > levels(subdf$let) [1] "a" "b" "c"


6

This has nothing to do with Hmisc. It is the way factors are created in base R : R> a <- c(1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0) R> factor(a,labels=c("No","Yes")) [1] Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Levels: No Yes R> str(factor(a,labels=c("No","Yes"))) Factor w/ 2 levels "No","Yes": 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 As explained in the ?factor help page : ...


6

mode(DATA$COLOR) is "numeric" because R internally stores factors as numeric codes (to save space), plus an associated vector of labels corresponding to the code values. When you print the factor, R automatically substitutes the corresponding label for each code. f <- factor(c("orange","banana","apple")) ## [1] orange banana apple ## Levels: apple ...


5

You must provide levels argument to factor (as Dirk wrote): set.seed(2342472) ( x <- round(runif(10,1,7)) ) # [1] 7 5 5 3 1 2 5 3 3 2 ( xf <- as.factor(x) ) # [1] 7 5 5 3 1 2 5 3 3 2 # Levels: 1 2 3 5 7 ( yf <- factor(x,levels=7:1) ) # [1] 7 5 5 3 1 2 5 3 3 2 # Levels: 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 you could do this on existing factor too ( yxf <- ...


5

You can convert levels after you create a factor so we can use that to our advantage. mydat <- c(1, 2, 3,2,3,4,3,2,1,2,4,4,6,5,7,8,9) # convert to factor ignoring code book dat <- factor(mydat) # Create map corresponding to codebook levels mymap <- c("1" = "Yes", "2" = "No") # Figure out which levels are accounted for by codebook id <- ...


4

so what you want, in R lexicon, is to change only the labels for a given factor variable (ie, leave the data as well as the factor levels, unchanged). df$letters = factor(df$letters, labels=c("d", "c", "b", "a")) given that you want to change only the datapoint-to-label mapping and not the data or the factor schema (how the datapoints are binned into ...


4

or you can simply use d$x2 = as.numeric(as.character(d$x))


4

This could be one solution k <- sub("^.*\\,","", levels(bins)) as.numeric(substr(k,1,nchar(k)-1)) gives [1] 6.94 14.00 21.00 28.00 35.00 42.00 49.00 56.00 63.10 70.10


4

The following protected method needs to go at the top of the API controller. Here you can specify the authorization level for each method and the rate limit. protected $methods = array( 'index_get' => array('level' => 10), 'types_get' => array('level' => 10, 'limit' => 20), );


4

I'll point you in the right direction by giving you bit of jargon to look for: "Finite State Machine". For game menus, a FSM should suffice. Now that you know the buzz word, you shuld be able to figure out a ton of examples just by googling. Although the basic idea is very simple, there are tons of different implementations. Just remember that this sort ...


4

Searching SO for "ggplot2 drop unused" brings up ggplot2 0.9.0 automatically dropping unused factor levels from plot legend? , which has the clue: put drop=FALSE in an explicit scale specification. library(scales) ggplot(df, aes(x=group, fill=type)) + geom_bar()+ scale_fill_discrete(drop=FALSE)


4

There are so many ways to implement levels in a cocos2d game. I think a straightforward way is to: Modeling your levels first. Decide what should be stored in a level's data model. I think typically you will have at least two kinds of data: Player data (Run-time generated, e.g. score, character's current location, etc.) Level data (e.g. what's on the ...


4

Using modulo division on cumsum of "new" values: dat$cu5 <- with(dat, 1+ cumsum( c(0, varA[-length(varA)] != varA[-1])) %/% 5) Adding one is only needed if you want the numbering to start at 1. If you factored it and added labels it would not be needed.


4

You could use the aggregate function: aggregate(tot_count ~ customer_id + event_type, X, sum) customer_id event_type tot_count 1 231 1 3 2 333 1 21 3 444 1 1 4 931 1 5 5 231 2 6 6 444 2 43 7 333 ...



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