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10

You need to install gawk. sudo apt-get install gawk The regex on Line 19 was /\/[^/]+$/ It is a known issue that mawk does not understand unescaped '/' in character classes at least up to version 1.3.3-15 (the one supplied on Ubuntu 11.04 (Natty)). mawk will think the / inside the bracket terminates the regex, and interpret as \/[^, which is surely ...


9

IIRC if you do #define _LARGEFILE_SOURCE #define _FILE_OFFSET_BITS 64 before all other includes you do not need to pass this flag. additionally see


8

O_LARGEFILE should never be used directly by applications. It's to be used internally by the 64-bit-offset-compatible version of open in libc when it makes the syscall to the kernel (Linux, or possibly another kernel with this 64-bit-offset-mode-is-a-second-class-citizen nonsense). Just make sure to always include -D_FILE_OFFSET_BITS=64 in your CFLAGS and ...


8

This has already been decided for you when libstdc++ was compiled, and normally depends on whether or not _GLIBCXX_USE_LFS was defined in c++config.h. If in doubt, pass your executable (or libstdc++.so, if linking against it dynamically) through readelf -r (or through strings) and see if your binary/libstdc++ linked against fopen/fseek/etc. or ...


8

On Darwin file I/O is 64-bit by default (10.5 at least), just found this by grepping in /usr/include: sys/_types.h:typedef __int64_t __darwin_off_t; unistd.h:typedef __darwin_off_t off_t; So all you need to do is something like #ifdef __APPLE__ # define off64_t off_t # define fopen64 fopen ... #endif


8

The GLIBC Feature test macros documentation states: _LARGEFILE_SOURCE If this macro is defined some extra functions are available which rectify a few shortcomings in all previous standards. Specifically, the functions fseeko and ftello are available. Without these functions the difference between the ISO C interface (fseek, ftell) and the low-level ...


6

This issue is caused by dyanmic link library path issue when the test programs try to link against libmpc/libmpfr/libgmp. Append below environment variable to allow ld link against the correct so file: export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=$LD_LIBRARY_PATH:/path/to/mpc/lib/ Then try build gcc again.


6

Do the following:- sudo apt-get install gawk and then retry. This worked for me.


5

Typically the statically typed languages are compiled languages. I guess the reason is, that statical analysis of types is rather expensive and you have to have an in depth look at all the code you're processing. After you've done that it feels like a waste to not write all that information into a file, so that you don't have to do it again next time. So you ...


4

In addition to yacto-projects and open-embedded, I would recommend buildroot Buildroot is a set of Makefiles and patches that makes it easy to generate a complete embedded Linux system. Buildroot can generate any or all of a cross-compilation toolchain, a root filesystem, a kernel image and a bootloader image. Buildroot is useful mainly for people ...


4

"*Building GCC is not trivial, but is not difficult if you follow the instructions carefully. Many people rush into trying to build it without reading the installation docs properly and make one or more of these common mistakes: 1) do not run ./configure from gcc src dir (this is not supported) => you need to run configure from outside the gcc source ...


3

If you want to program kernel modules then it doesn't matter which distribution you choose. You will need to be able to recompile the kernel from source and install a new kernel yourself. Even just for a kernel module you'll want to be able to compile the latest kernel and develop against that, otherwise you won't be able to get the module accepted in to ...


2

quick google. F3, javaFX script, Linden Scripting Language (scripting for second life), Unlike the comment on the first answer F# can be used as a scripting language http://blogs.msdn.com/chrsmith/archive/2008/09/12/scripting-in-f.aspx Felix, Tuga, CFGScript, Talc, Angelscript, and guessing there is more than that quick search. Douglas


2

If you are using GCC, you can take advantage of a GCC extension called __gnu_cxx::stdio_filebuf, which ties an IOStream to a standard C FILE descriptor. You need to define the following two things: _LARGEFILE_SOURCE _FILE_OFFSET_BITS=64 For example: #include <cstdio> #include <fstream> #include <ext/stdio_filebuf.h> int main() ...


2

You can't rush through this, I am NOT an lfs user (let alone an expert), and in 2 minutes of reading I found http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/lfs/view/6.6/chapter05/generalinstructions.html Important After installing each package, delete its source and build directories, unless specifically instructed otherwise. Deleting the sources prevents ...


2

The GB locale is not installed by default in the LFS implementation. You can see this if you run locale -a You need to install the locale definition for GB using localedef exec the following: localedef -c -f UTF-8 -i en_GB en_GB.UTF-8 localedef -c -f ISO-8859-1 -i en_GB en_GB.ISO-8859-1 This give you the two main standards. Then all you need to do ...


2

This looks like a problem in a test script. You can try one of the following: leave out the step "make check" from the instructions and continue with "make install". use a newer version of the pkg-config package (go to the "stable" version of lfs and get the pkg-config package from the instructions there. BTW: Why are you using LFS 6.5? The current ...


2

These are few pointers that come to my mind and definitely it is not complete: Your PATH should be updated in the startup scripts like ~/.bashrc, /etc/profile.d, and so on to reflect the updated directories. Configuration files tend to use /var quite often. (/var/log, /var/tmp) You'd need to modify all these location references. Basically your kernel is ...


2

If you just want to make a liveCD that will boot and run then a guide like this may help http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/hints/downloads/files/OLD/bootcd-2.6-udev-nptl.txt , but to make a system that will install on any generic PC (like your own distrobution essentially) you would need to either package several kernels, or one generic one, this is assuming ...


2

I've found a solution to solve this problem: Fixed by this sed in the gcc source before the first pass of gcc: sed -i '/k prot/agcc_cv_libc_provides_ssp=yes' gcc/configure and: sed -i 's/if \((code.*))\)/if (\1 \&\& \!DEBUG_INSN_P (insn))/' gcc/sched-deps.c But these are already mentioned in the LFS-manual. I don't know why I didn't see them ...


2

I think, it very much depends on what you want to achieve and on what device, etc. My bet is, that you should learn as much about FirefoxOS as possible, as it is exactly offering, what you are looking for. Read about it's architecture: It is also called boot2gecko (b2g) and consists of three layers, from bottom to top: Gonk - the underlying Linux / ...


2

you can create a folder called system and the move all the files into the /system folder. and after that create symlinks, so the system can still be used. example: su -i cd / mkdir system mv /usr /system/usr ln -s /system/usr /usr I just did it........it broke my system XD (i think it was because i moved all the files into /system , including /boot ...


1

You are likely to be missing Lua include files; see this SO answer for details on how to set it up. Simply getting lfs.dll may not be so easy as different DLLs may depends on different Lua DLLs on Windows. I have lfs.dll that is compiled against Lua51.dll, so if this works for your project/needs, you can get a compiled version here.


1

A filesystem is really just a big array of bytes stored (typically) in a partition. Mounting is how you get access to the files within it. Every filesystem has its own root directory. In Windows, you have drive letters (like C:) that refer to the root directories of different filesystems, but Unix and Linux use a different approach. There's a single ...


1

This error message can arise from a number of different reasons. The best way to figure out which one is to check the logfile '/home/manu/gcc/gcc/i686-pc-linux-gnu/libgcc/config.log' in the example below. Or in the original posters case '/mnt/LFS/source/gcc-4.6.2/x86_64-lfs-linux-gnu/libgcc' and look for the last error line. Quoting GCC FAQ: ...


1

your probably trying to use bad Compiler flags -- over optimization or -fPIC or some kind of SSP/ hardening . Try the default optimization flags and see if it compiles ok echo $CFLAGS echo $CXXFLAGS echo $CPPFLAGS and examine the configparm file in your glibc build folder for your specs


1

Use this to delete all the files in /documents directory local lfs = require "lfs"; local doc_dir = system.DocumentsDirectory; local doc_path = system.pathForFile("", doc_dir); local resultOK, errorMsg; for file in lfs.dir(doc_path) do local theFile = system.pathForFile(file, doc_dir); if (lfs.attributes(theFile, "mode") ~= "directory") then ...


1

I had a similar problem with tmp files due to many files created in tmp. You can try to clean your /tmp directory.


1

Nope. You can't run ARM binaries on x86, so you can't enter its chroot. No amount of environment variables will change that. You might be able to continue the process by creating a filesystem image for the target and running it under an emulator (e.g, qemu-system-arm), but that's quite a different thing.


1

You need to install GNU Binutils package. http://www.gnu.org/software/binutils/



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