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41

The Apache license is quite like the BSD license in its scope. It's pretty free and easy, you're not required to distribute the source code of a covered work, and you don't have to worry about it "infecting" a derived work; you just need to be sure to include their license. The (full) GPL is often misunderstood; I've come across many misinterpretations of ...


38

Linking has a specific meaning in computer programming. You're not linking GPL'ed or LGPL'ed code at all, you're only spawning a GPL'ed or LGPL'ed binary, and the GPL and LGPL permit this. Your users are free to use that binary themselves for its authors' intended purposes and are free to download and compile the source themselves, so all of their freedoms ...


33

For GPL, yes. Any GPL Code/Content that's compiled into your Application or the Package will make it GPL. (Edit: What could be safe is if the Icon is a separate file and is used. That could be a grey area, as you are not using GPL Code to access it. But any attempt to embed it will force your program to GPL, it's one of the most restrictive licenses out ...


33

If you want to distribute a combined work, you'll have to use the following license; Proprietary Source code + GPL Source code Either static or dynamically linked: You must release both parts as GPL. Proprietary Source code + LGPL Source code statically linked: Either you must release both parts as LGPL. Or provide everything that allow the user to ...


25

Here was the official response I got from the FSF: Hi Benjamin, I'm sorry for the late response to this message. Because we are a non-profit organization with very limited resources, messages to this address often get backlogged, and we are always working hard to keep up. While we can certainly understand the need for a Lesser AGPL ...


24

Yes. But you have to make your changes public (under the GPL or LGPL) only if you modify the LGPL'd library in any way. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LGPL


23

Firstly, you can definitely use the library. Whether you want to, is a separate question. If you do not modify the source code, and do not statically link to the library, or rely on internal data structures of the library, then you do not have to distribute the source code of your application to anyone who gets the binaries from you, but you have to ...


23

You should really check the GNU license FAQs - but the main points are: If you change the Qt source code you're using, you must make available the changes you made to Qt (not your app), and tools and/or instructions on how to rebuild such a modified Qt version. You must use Qt as in such a way that users can replace the Qt functionality within your app ...


18

Actually, the LGPL allows static linking as long as you meet a few very specific requirements. For example, if all distribution is done from your website where you have StaticProgram.exe, you're okay as long as users could also download StaticProgram.obj and LGPL-library-source.tar.gz. You could also distribute StaticProgram.exe with a written offer to ...


18

I don't know anything about iText, but if they released 4.x on LGPL conditions you can use it on that conditions regardless of what happened after that. They could change license, even to a proprietary one, fork, abandon project or whatever — it cannot affect 4.x licensing.


15

You can keep your code proprietary, but you must release the modifications you made to the LGPL library.


14

KissFFT Some benchmarks comparing to fftw: http://www.fftw.org/speed/Pentium4-2.4GHz-gcc/ EDIT: There is EigenFFT - a C++-frontend for KissFFT as an unsupported part of Eigen.


14

Apache License 2.0 (not earlier) licenses are GPL-compatible (GPLv3). This means that you can distribute your project under whatever license you want. This is on the assumption that your code is not 'derived work' (modifying the source code of the libraries you refer to) but just using them. If you were modifying them you must release your project under the ...


13

I would say you were nowhere close to alone. The only reasons not to use LGPL libraries are: You've fallen for FUD You want to distribute modifications to the library itself, without distributing source code. And consider this: since glibc is LGPL'd, almost every time someone compiles something with GCC, they're linking LGPL code.


13

IANAL, but I believe this is allowed. There's nothing in the BSD license that prevents you from mixing in code of other licenses, and the LGPL doesn't care what you link it against either. You will be subject to the following restrictions however: 1) For the BSD portion, if there is an attribution clause, you will still need to honor it and include the ...


12

No, if your program is closed source and you want to link against the LGPL version of Qt you must use dynamic linking. If you want to statically link then you must buy a license for Qt. To use LGPL code in your closed source project, the user has to be able to replace the lgpl portion of the code. The easiest and by far the most common way to do this is to ...


12

You can (and we do) sell commercial apps based on the Qt libs. All you need to do is. 1, Dynamically link your exe against the Qt dll's. so your product's installer includes your app.exe and only the used Qtcore4.dll etc. This is a good idea anyway because you can upgrade your app without having to change MBs of dlls. 2, If you fix or change anything in ...


11

The user must be able to modify and/or recompile the LGPL-library and re-link it to your application (so that (s)he can fix bugs or add features in said library, which is what the library's author wanted to achieve by LGPL-ing it). In order to facilitate that, this usually means either: dynamic linking to the LGPL lib (i.e. ship it as DLLs/SOs) shipping ...


10

Yes, it does to a certain degree. You are e.g required to allow people to upgrade the LGPL'd library without your help. I suggest reading through the whole license yourself, as you're legally obligated to adhere to it's clauses. Know what you oblige yourself to, don't just take other people's words for it :)


10

The LGPL basically requires (read the full license and FAQ for details): You mention that it is licensed under the LGPL, with reference to the full license. That you distribute the code, and any changes to it, under the terms of the LGPL. You must release the source code in it's preferred form (not minified or obfuscated), including any changes that you ...


10

In a nutshell, the idea of LGPL'd projects (usually libraries) is that you are free to use them as you wish in your own application, be it open or closed source, free or proprietary - as long as you publish the source code of the LGPL'd part (if you modify the LGPL'd part, you must publish the modified sources, under LGPL). Additionally, the libraries must ...


10

Have a look at Wykobi. It is a templated library and you can template the dimension as 2D. The cost of the library is not clear from the site. Check


10

I trashed a few hours of my life on this too and I ended up building ICU with a minimal dat file. Here's my post on the Qt Project Forum: http://qt-project.org/forums/viewthread/38489/ Here's the direct link of my 711Kb version of the DLL: http://qlcplus.sourceforge.net/icudt51.dll [EDIT 20140708] Here's version 52 to be used with Qt 5.3.1: ...


9

To be 100% sure, you should read FAQ and then contact a lawyer who is familiar with software licensing. Don't talk to the lawyers who aren't because they'll tell you not to use anything free/opensource just to be on the safe side, which anyone can say. Anyway, what do you mean by "data source which is GPL"? Is GPL source code being linked into your ...


9

You can't remove the BSD license. What you can do is put it under another license also. For example, Microsoft adopted BSD networking code at one time. If you looked at the appropriate displays, you'd find the notices required by the license. On the other hand, Microsoft's copy was also under whatever license Microsoft used, and Microsoft's modifications ...


9

I think it would violate the LGPL agreement. You're modifing the library by taking a sub-section of it. That binds you to releasing that sub-section via open source. How about this: make a smaller library that was a subset of functions / classes release it through sourceforge use that LPGL library without modification


9

Imagine you want to compile the javascript code of CkEditor into a binary application. Just assume this is possible. Then you would not ship the source code of the library any longer. If you now even make modifications to the source code to distribute within the binary, you do not satisfy the LGPL as it requires that you provide the source for the library ...


9

Yes, so long as you don't statically link to them (ie: use them as DLLs). Though wxWidgets allows you to statically link without becoming GPL'd. None of the above. If you are making a 3D game, then none of these is good for your needs. The needs of a GUI for a game are very different from the needs of a GUI for a typical desktop application. In a game, you ...



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