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5

Just create a file for the interposed code (making sure the implementation is out of line)... the namespaces, class name and function should be the same as for the method you want to intercept. In your class definition, don't mention the other methods you don't want to intercept. Remember that LD_PRELOAD needs a full path to the intercepting shared object. ...


4

Nevermind -- stupid mistake. Wasn't checking both absolute and relative paths...


4

The magic words are "library interposition". Here's a good tutorial: http://developers.sun.com/solaris/articles/lib_interposers.html


3

I think you've made the right choice looking at mach_star. If you actually want to learn how the darwin link-loader works, etc., I'd put more time into your DYLD insertion problems. But obviously you're looking for a quick solution, not an in-depth learning experience. And I doubt anyone's going to be able to figure out the problems you're having without ...


2

If it's open for writing, it's most likely going through the creat function (I'm guessing fopen would be redirecting you there). Check your fcntl.h for a complete list.


2

I am not sure what the cause of your problem is, but using strace on your program might give some insight. It should be part of any sane Linux distribution.


2

The purpose of memory-mapped file IO is not to go through system calls for reads and writes, but rely on VM/buffer cache to do the work. If you hide the fact that the file has been memory mapped, what is the advantage here? How would you know at what address the file is mapped?


2

You'll find from one of ltrace developer a way to do this. See this post, which includes a full patch in order to catch dynamically loaded library. In order to call it from python, you'll probably need to make a C module.


2

google-perftools has their own implementation of Detour under src/windows/preamble_patcher* . This is windows-only at the moment, but I don't see any reason it wouldn't work on any x86 machine except for the fact that it uses win32 functions to look up symbol addresses. A quick scan of the code and I see these win32 functions used, all of which have linux ...


2

It wouldn't be very portable, but you could write your interposing function in C and give it the mangled name of the C++ method. You would have to handle the this parameter explicitly, of course, but I think all ELF ABIs just treat it as an invisible first argument.


1

1 blocks are still reachable These blocks are just fine. You don't need to worry about them, they are not leaks. There is nothing to see here, move along. It's the "definitely lost" that you should care about.


1

You can first apply some heuristics to the copied memory and based on that you can decide whether you want to print it. static int maybe_string(const void *data, size_t n) { const unsigned char *p; size_t i; p = data; for (i = 0; i < n; i++) { int c = p[i]; if (c == '\n' || c == '\r' || c == '\t') continue; if (1 <= c ...


1

The error hast nothing to do with the mProtect(). This is actually the exact same place I have placed the code snippet as well. Here is my code and it works fine: void* hook_call(char *soname, char *symbol, void* newval) { soinfo *si = NULL; Elf32_Rel *rel = NULL; Elf32_Sym *s = NULL; unsigned int sym_offset = 0; if (!soname || !symbol || ...


1

You can reference Suterusu. But it's not thread safe, and I'm also trying to find a thread safe solution.


1

This is how you can hook syscalls on Android without root permissions ( only working for your own process of course, this is not system wide ).


1

I know how to do this on Linux, so maybe it would be the same(-ish) on OSX. You first call fork() to duplicate your process. The return value of fork() indicates whether you are the parent or child. The parent gets the pid of the child process, and the child gets zero. So then, the child calls exec() to actually begin executing the new executable. With ...


1

As void* represents a raw block of memory, there is no way to determine what actual data lies there. However, you can make a "string-like" memory dump on every operation, just give the resulting output some sort of the "upper output limit". This could be implemented the following way: const size_t kUpperLimit = 32; void output_memory_dump(void* memory) { ...


1

substituting a certain file when requested with another Sounds like you check only for the input file (do you check by filename?). You need to check and substitute the output file, too. If you output goes to one of the standard outputs, then you need to close and reopen them with your output substitute) before you fork into the executable. To find all ...



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