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why this approach would be better than e.g keeping the state in a singleton that is managed centrally by the application? A singleton is OK for app-wide state. However, there can be zero, one, or several instances of particular Activity subclass, making the singleton approach problematic. Plus, on the whole, we try not to have any more singletons than ...


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I've figured out a simple way to manually trigger my app to bootstrap (at least it works for single page app), here's how you can do it too: Don't import any of your custom-element.html from the index.html or any other page directly imported from the index. Your polymer-ready event should fire straight away but none of your custom elements will be loaded. ...


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After investigating some time i finally "solved" the problem by creating the view in onCreateView and destroy it in onDestroyView, without understanding why the system does not call the callback as described in the sdk documentation.


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Ensuring the context is not null in onStop is fine, Here is the caution line from the developers documentation - if you need a Context object within your Fragment, you can call getActivity(). However, be careful to call getActivity() only when the fragment is attached to an activity. When the fragment is not yet attached, or was detached during the ...


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I recommend to use org.apache.log4j.RollingFileAppender 1 instead org.apache.log4j.FileAppender. It is always easier to handle small files ... especially if an error occurs. And I also recommend using org.apache.log4j.DBAppender 2 instead org.apache.log4j.jdbc.JDBCAppender. See also: Short introduction to log4j: Ceki Gülcü, March 2002 Log4j Best ...


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Don't do it. In my own experience, using private variables on the Action is not reliable, even if it sometimes appears to work, you'll likely end up with something non-determinant. See, your code might work fine with 1 request, but not work at all when multiple request are handled simultaneously. This user's problem is claiming the exact opposite ...


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Apparantly I can answer my question myself. When ResourceAdapter.start() is called, the provided BootstrapContext contains a XATerminator. This terminator exposes the lifecycle methods. see http://docs.oracle.com/javaee/6/api/javax/resource/spi/ResourceAdapter.html http://docs.oracle.com/javaee/6/api/javax/resource/spi/BootstrapContext.html When ready to ...


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you can use isChangingConfigurations() Read from documentation Check to see whether this activity is in the process of being destroyed in order to be recreated with a new configuration. This is often used in onStop() to determine whether the state needs to be cleaned up or will be passed on to the next instance of the activity via ...


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Activity have six states Created Started Resumed Paused Stopped Destoryed Activity lifecycle have seven methods onCreate() onStart() onResume() onPause() onStopped() onRestart() onDestory() Situations When open the app onCreate() --> onStart() --> onResume() When back button pressed and exit the app onPaused() -- > onStop() --> ...



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