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5

Version 0.18 of scipy--currently out as a release candidate, but not yet offically released--has scipy.stats.ortho_group and scipy.stats.special_ortho_group. The pull request where it was added is https://github.com/scipy/scipy/pull/5622 For example, In [24]: from scipy.stats import ortho_group # Requires version 0.18 of scipy In [25]: m = ortho_group....


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Document of the version 3.2.8 Currently, the following algorithms can make use of multi-threading: general matrix - matrix products, PartialPivLU http://eigen.tuxfamily.org/dox/TopicMultiThreading.html As dev document mentions more algorithms are using multi-threading, you need to change to Eigen3.3-beta1 or development branch to use the parallel ...


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Assuming you have your line segments always as a closed polygonal chain and you have them in some sort of edge list. And, as you said, you have the intersection points already computed (brute force means O(n^2) time, in this case that is optimal as the line segments can intersect n^2 times). You can insert your intersection points from (1) into this list ...


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You can use snprintf to convert your ints to strings, then strstr to check if present. Something along this line: char buffer[20] = ""; int n = 3450; snprintf( buffer, 20, "%d", n ); printf( "%s\n", strstr( buffer, "34" ) ? "present" : "not present" );


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Your initial thought was headed in the right direction. The first step is to count the digits in the number to be located. The number "34" has two digits, so the module is 10 to the 2nd power, or 100. If the number had only one digit, the module is 10. If the number has three digits, the module is 1000. And so on. Then, this becomes a matter of: Start ...


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Usually when people talk about speeding up linear solvers res = X \ b, it’s for multiple bs. But since your b isn’t changing, and you just keep changing X, none of those tricks apply. The only way to speed this up, from a mathematical perspective, seems to be to ensure that Julia is picking the fastest solver for X \ b, i.e., if you know X is positive-...


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Complex functions usually allocate temp memory during computation. 10000x10000 looks quite large if a temp dense matrix of such size is allocated during the computation. You could try a few smaller problem sizes and find out the upper limit of your current computer.


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If you can rename your keys to be 0-indexed, you might use direct array querrying on your unit vectors: >>> units = np.array([D[1], D[2]]) >>> B = units[A - 1] # -1 because 0 indexed: 1 -> 0, 2 -> 1 >>> B array([[0, 1], [1, 0], [0, 1]]) And similarly for any shape: >>> A = np.random....


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This is the rvs method pulled from the https://github.com/scipy/scipy/pull/5622/files, with minimal change - just enough to run as a stand alone numpy function. def rvs(dim=3): random_state = np.random H = np.eye(dim) D = np.ones((dim,)) for n in range(1, dim): x = random_state.normal(size=(dim-n+1,)) D[n-1] = np.sign(x[...


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You can access the transformed sample coordinates with OrdinationResults.samples. This will return a pandas.DataFrame row-indexed by sample ID (i.e. the IDs in your distance matrix). Since principal coordinate analysis operates on a distance matrix of samples, transformed feature coordinates (OrdinationResults.features) are not available. Other ordination ...


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Your code seems right, you’re just encountering machine precision issues. A*B.t() for A the third row and B for the second row (or vice versa) should be zero but isn’t, but is within machine precision. Scipy’s cosine has the same problem: In [10]: from scipy.spatial.distance import cosine In [11]: 1 - cosine([-0.2590, -0.7052, 0.6590, -0.0371], [-0.0230, 0....


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I added this feature to work I've previously done on Leaflet Maps. This may apply to your application. See: www.svgdiscovery.com/K/K04A.htm This uses two key points that are common to both the Leaflet Map and the imported SVG paths.


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I would use a list concatenation like so >>> B = [[1, x[0], x[1]] for x in [p_0, p_1, p_2]] >>> z = [[x[2]] for x in [p_0, p_1, p_2]] An example >>> p_0, p_1, p_2 = (1, 2, 3), (4, 5, 6), (7, 8, 9) >>> B = [[1, x[0], x[1]] for x in [p_0, p_1, p_2]] >>> z = [[x[2]] for x in [p_0, p_1, p_2]] >>> print(B) ...


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>>> p_0 = (-1,2,3) >>> p_1 = (4,5,6) >>> p_2 = (7,8,9) >>> B = np.c[np.ones((3,1)),np.c_[p_0,p_1,p_2]] >>> np.linalg.solve(B[:,:-1],B[:,-1])


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You could use p = np.row_stack([p_0, p_1, p_2]) B = np.ones_like(p) # copy the first two columns of p into the last 2 columns of B B[:, 1:] = p[:, :2] z = p[:, 2] For example, import numpy as np p_0 = (1,2,3) p_1 = (4,-5,6) p_2 = (7,8,9) p = np.row_stack([p_0, p_1, p_2]) B = np.ones_like(p) B[:, 1:] = p[:, :2] z = p[:, 2] a = np.linalg.solve(B, z) ...


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Since you mentioned SymPy, you can easily compute the whole thing once with x1, x2, x3 = symbols('x1, x2, x3') X = Matrix(...) A = Matrix(...) B = Matrix(...) C = Matrix(...) (replace ... with the actual matrix entries). Then compute the product result = X*A*B*C*X.T You can then use lambdify on this matrix to convert this into a numeric function that ...


1

Expressing the problem in einsum terms might help: np.einsum('ij,jk,kl,lm,nm->in', X, A, B, C, X) which might profitably be broken into 2 steps: ABC = np.einsum('jk,kl,lm->jm', A, B, C) # k by k np.einsum('ij,jm,nm->in', X, ABC, X) So the i,j element of the result is: R[i,j] = np.einsum('j,jm,m->', X[i,:], X[j,:]) and with the new @ ...


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If I read your question correctly, you have two matrixes A and B, and you’re looking for C such that A * C = B + epsilon where you want to minimize epsilon’s sum of squares. Your question seems to suggest you have some constraint on C but it’s not obvious what that is. But as you indicate in your answer, a linear solver will find a C that minimizes epsilon’...


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Here is an implementation of a solution for plane-plane intersections described at http://geomalgorithms.com/a05-_intersect-1.html . Essentially, you first use the cross product of the normals of the planes to find the direction of a line in both planes. Secondly, you use some algebra on the implicit equation of the planes (P . n + d = 0 where P is some ...



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