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4

For invertible matrices A the code c = A(i:j,:)*inv(A)*b is (up to numerical error) equivalent to: tmp = A*inv(A)*b; c = tmp(i:j); The matrix product A*inv(A) will cancel each other out (as does 123*(1/123) or more generally x*(1/x) for x~=0), (again: for invertible matrices up to numerical error), so it is equivalent to: tmp = b; c = tmp(i:j); There ...


4

Diagonal entries of a matrix have a standar definition in J: extract =: (<0 1)&|: This is, unfortunately, hidden somewhere in the vocabulary. (You can see it passing in transpose) I usually use diag as diag =: 3 :'(2##y) $ ,_1 (((#y)#0),~])\y' but I no longer remember why. Your version is better.


4

You should use std::bind to bind the fixed parameters. This will produce a partially applied function you can pass the remaining argument into. You example should probably look something like: std::function<double(double)> fnX = std::bind(fn, std::placeholders::_1, y);


3

Lambda to the rescue: std::function<double(double)> fnX = [fn,y](double xVar){ return fn( xVar, y); }; this generates an anonymous callable object that takes one double and returns one double. (the return type is deduced from the return type of fn) The syntax for lambda is [ capture-list ]( argument-list ) optional -> then return type { ...


3

There are several things that seem incorrect to me with your example. First, when you don't have a ranking available for a specific user / movie combination, then you should not fill this with zero. This would tell SVD or any other type of principal component analysis (PCA) that these are the ranks (which are artificially low). Furthermore, covariances ...


2

Although the question mentioned C++, I implemented 3x3 matrix multiplication C=A*B in C# (.NET 4.5) and ran some basic timing tests on my 64 bit windows 7 machine with optimizations. 10,000,000 multiplications took about 0.556 seconds with a naive implementation and 0.874 seconds with the laderman code from the other answer. Interestingly, the laderman ...


2

It looks like gsl_multifit_linear(X,y,c) solves the problem min_c ||Xc-y||^2. I'm actually not 100% sure from the documentation but it looks like gsl_multifit_wlinear(X,y,w,c) solves min_c ||Xc - y||^2_W where W = diag(w) and ||e||^2_W = e'*W^(-1)*e. So, you can solve this in Eigen by rewriting min_c ||Xc - y||^2_W as min_c ||W^(-1/2) (Xc - y)||^2. We have ...


2

The solvers support a callback keyword argument that gets called after every iteration. So you could do something like this: def solve_sparse(A, b): num_iters = 0 def callback(xk): num_iters += 1 # call the solver on your data return scipy.sparse.linalg.cg(A, b, callback=callback)[0]


2

j is the imaginary number, the square root of minus one. In math it is often denoted by i, in engineering, and in Python, it is denoted by j.


1

A single eigenvalue is a scalar quantity, but an (m, m) matrix will have m eigenvalues (and m eigenvectors). The Wiki page on eigenvalues and eigenvectors has some examples that might help you to get your head around the concepts. As @unutbu mentions, j denotes the imaginary number in Python. In general, a matrix may have complex eigenvalues (i.e. with real ...


1

According to this Wikipedia article the travelling salesman problem can be modelled as an integer linear program, which I believe to be the key issue of the question. The idea is to have decision variables of permitted values in {0,1} which model selected edges in the graph. Suitable constraints must ensure that the selected edges cover every node, the ...


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import org.apache.spark.mllib.linalg.{Vectors,Vector,Matrix,SingularValueDecomposition,DenseMatrix,DenseVector} import org.apache.spark.mllib.linalg.distributed.RowMatrix def computeInverse(X: RowMatrix): DenseMatrix = { val nCoef = X.numCols.toInt val svd = X.computeSVD(nCoef, computeU = true) if (svd.s.size < nCoef) { ...


1

It doesn't appear to be implemented yet. At the end of the compute function there is: m_eigenvectorsOk = false;//computeEigenvectors; indicating that they're not actually calculated. Additionally, the eigenvectors() function is commented out and looks like (note the TODO): //template<typename MatrixType> //typename ...


1

It's strange that this isn't implemented, the docs suggest that it is. It's definitely worth asking on the Eigen mailing list or filing a ticket, maybe somebody is working on this and it's in the latest repository. I have in the past used the GeneralizedSelfAdjointEigenSolver and it definitely produces eigenvectors. So if you know that both your matrices ...


1

Using \ to find the inverse is the generally recommended method. Without exploiting any special structures of the matrices I'd simply do this Lambda=(N*(Kt\N.'))\P


1

As of version 5.0, Armadillo has the spsolve() function for solving sparse systems.


1

The problem of finding an optimal permutation of rows and columns of a matrix for a minimum fill-in matrix-factorization is not a trivial trask (as pointed out in the comments). Thus, heuristic algorithms are used in praxis. There are some libraries that implement heuristic renumbering/ordering-strategies, often based on graph-algorithms for the ...


1

(* =) 2 3 4 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 If you are working with unique elements. diag=: * = NB. a hook defined tacitly diag 89 3 56.6 89 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 56.6 The = breaks down if the elements are not unique as the matrix is no longer square diag 3 4 4 |length error: diag | diag 3 4 4


1

I'm not familiar with the matrix formulation for triangle intersection - it sounds quite expensive. My own code is below, where my e1 and e2 are equivalent to yours - i.e. they represent the edge vectors from v0 to v1 and v2 respectively: // NB: triangles are assumed to be in world space vector3 pvec = vector3::cross(ray.direction(), e2); double det = ...


1

You can implement your loop over the number of row in a function, and call this function with the multiprocessing.Pool() object. This will parallelize the execution of your loop and should add a nice speedup. Example : from multiprocessing import Pool def f(row_id): # define here your function inside the loop return vstack(res_rows, 'csr') if ...


1

There are any of a number of ways you can determine how similar two vectors are, though I suspect not all of them are strictly speaking correlation measures. If you're interested in using the magnitude of the vectors and their difference, the obvious metric would be the relative magnitude of the difference vector and the average magnitude of the two given ...


1

Are you sure? It looks correct to me. When I produce C and D with eigs, I get: >> [C, D] = eigs(A) C = 0.0520 0.0170 0.0531 0.0158 -0.0358 -0.0144 -0.0788 -0.0433 -0.0894 -0.0327 0.0626 0.0277 0.0717 0.0801 0.0973 0.0510 -0.0741 -0.0387 -0.0437 -0.1180 -0.0743 -0.0694 0.0684 0.0466 ...


1

As it has been already pointed out especially by Bart in the comments above, using GPUs to calculate the calculation of the determinant of small matrices (even of many of them) does not ensure gain over other computing platforms. I think that the problem of calculating the determinant of matrices is per sé an interesting issue which may occur several times ...


1

The vector OP is P = (1-t)*A+t*B and you need to find P such that C×P=0 where × is the vector cross product. In the end I get t = (ax*cy-ay*cx)/(ax*cy-ay*cx-bx*cy+by*cx) px = cx*(ax*by-ay*bx)/(ax*cy-ay*cx-bx*cy+by*cx) py = cy*(ax*by-ay*bx)/(ax*cy-ay*cx-bx*cy+by*cx) Example, A=(1,6), B=(5,2), C=(0.5,0.8) t = 11/26 px = 35/13 py = 56/13 Check results ...


1

When you access arrays out of bounds anything can occur. You write to some unknown part of memory, which can trigger other random errors. The program is not standard conforming and its behaviour is undefined. You can't expect anything.



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