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49

That's because the starting and ending points of the gradient are at the edges of the padding-box and border is rendered outside the padding-box. So, the borders look funny because the background is repeated on each side outside the padding-box to cover the border-box. The box-shadow:inset is rendered inside the padding-box (just like background) and gives ...


38

Solution The simplest way to fix this issue would be by setting the value for the background-origin property as border-box . .colors { width: 100px; border: 10px solid rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2); height: 50px; background: linear-gradient(to right, #78C5D6, #459BA8, #79C267, #C5D647, #F5D63D, #F08B33, #E868A2, #BE61A5); background-origin: ...


32

background-image: -ms-linear-gradient(right, #0c93C0, #FFF); background-image: -o-linear-gradient(right, #0c93C0, #FFF); All experimental CSS properties are getting a prefix: -webkit- for Webkit browsers (chrome, Safari) -moz- for FireFox -o- for Opera -ms- for Internet Explorer no prefix for an implementation which is in full accordance with ...


30

same answer as here: Multi-color diagonal gradient in winforms Multi-color diagonal gradient in winforms here is a little example for you inspired by this article http://www.bobpowell.net/linear.htm (Multiple colour blends) void MainFormPaint(object sender, PaintEventArgs e) { LinearGradientBrush br = new LinearGradientBrush(this.ClientRectangle, ...


26

Try this - http://jsfiddle.net/fwkgM/1/ background-color: #9e9e9e; background-image: linear-gradient(to bottom, #9e9e9e, #454545); CSS3 Please


25

You can do this in a much simpler way, using just an element and a rotated pseudo element (any browser that supports CSS gradients also supports CSS transforms and pseudo-elements) with an angled linear gradient. Also, don't use the old WebKit syntax (see this bit about the history of the syntax). Working in current versions of Chrome, Opera, Firefox, IE on ...


20

<style type="text/css"> h1 { font-family: "Myriad Pro", sans-serif; font-size: 40px; font-weight: normal; } /* --- start of magic ;-) --- */ .white-gradient { position: relative; } .white-gradient:after { content: ''; display: block; position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; height: 100%; ...


16

Just use in the CSS whatever you would use in a fill attribute. Of course, this requires that you have defined the linear gradient somewhere in your SVG. Here is a complete example: rect { cursor: pointer; shape-rendering: crispEdges; fill: url(#MyGradient); } <svg width="100" height="50" version="1.1" ...


16

I found the best way to do this is to use SVG gradients, it's easy to do and doesn't require any images, below is some code that creates a simple text gradient using SVG. <svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" version="1.1"> <defs> <linearGradient id="grad1" x1="0%" y1="0%" x2="0%" y2="100%"> <stop ...


15

Have you tried: background: -webkit-linear-gradient(#917c4d, #ffffff); WebKit updated to match the spec syntax, so you should have this to get maximum browser support: background: -webkit-gradient(linear, center top, center bottom, from(#917c4d), to(#ffffff)); background: -webkit-linear-gradient(#917c4d, #ffffff); background: ...


14

linear-gradient() is supported unprefixed on IE10 RTM and later, including IE11. You never need the -ms- prefix unless for some obscure reason you need to target the pre-release versions of IE10. Note that the directional syntax for linear-gradient() is different; what was originally top is now represented as to bottom instead (see this blog post, this ...


13

your problem can be solved by setting the gradients coordinate system to user space (instead of the default object-bounding box). you might try <defs> <linearGradient id="red_black" x1="0%" y1="0%" x2="0%" y2="100%" gradientUnits="userSpaceOnUse"> <stop offset="0%" style="stop-color:rgb(255,0,0);stop-opacity:1"/> ...


13

The background is repeating itself under the border. The background runs only in the "body" of the element, under the border is an expansion and repeat starts occurring. See this example with no-repeat on the border. UPDATE Playing with background position & size can help by expanding the background and then adjusting it's location. Check this fiddle ...


12

Your gradient will work in Safari if you wrap a defs tag around it: <svg version="1.1" id="Layer_1" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" x="0px" y="0px" width="300px" height="300px" viewBox="0 0 300 300" enable-background="new 0 0 300 300" xml:space="preserve"> <defs> <linearGradient ...


12

Linear Gradient Approach You can make use of linear-gradient background images like in the below snippet. Making the color stop point of one color as the starting point of the next color would produce a block like effect instead of an actual gradient like effect. Linear gradients are supported in the recent versions of all browsers. If you want to support ...


12

Start with something like the following: var dom = document.getElementById('mainHolder'); dom.style.backgroundImage = '-moz-linear-gradient(' + orientation + ', ' + colorOne + ', ' + colorTwo + ')'; If you need to support more browsers than Firefox, this will need to be done in combination with either browser-sniffing or some Modernizr-like ...


11

Here an example, which works with Opera, Internet Explorer and many other web browsers. If a browser does not support gradients, it will show a normal background color. background: #f2f5f6; background: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #f2f5f6 0%, #e3eaed 37%, #c8d7dc 100%); background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, color-stop(0%,#f2f5f6), ...


11

This is simple to implement but a bit hard to grasp, you need to specify that the gradient units are userSpaceOnUse and then define the region where you want it to apply through x1, x2, y1, y2: var gradient = svg .append("linearGradient") .attr("y1", minY) .attr("y2", maxY) .attr("x1", "0") .attr("x2", "0") .attr("id", "gradient") ...


10

As I had mentioned in comments, when you add a transparent layer on top of another gradient, it will only show through the colored gradient layer that is below it (and not the image that is present in the container). So, it would be very tough (almost impossible) to achieve this with gradients. You'd have to use a mask image to achieve it. The below is a ...


9

It is an interesting feature of Excel about which you wrote in your question. I haven't known about this before. What you need is to implement a custom formater function. In general is is very easy. You should write a small function which display the cell contain based on the value (text over the color bar). Moreover you should define also Unformatting ...


9

If you do not set an html background, body's background is applyed to HTML. Since body is in absolute, it has a 0 size for HTML and it doesn't trigger anything for HTML layout. try to apply:html {height:100%;} and see what it does : http://codepen.io/anon/pen/JGApK


9

You can use multiple linear-gradient images as background for the parent div container like shown in the below snippet. This is one way to achieve it without adding any extra elements. The background need not be a solid color. This approach can support transparency. The only thing you would need to make note of here is that since we are using percentages in ...


8

Try this: m = tcrossprod(sin(seq(0,pi,length=1e2)), cos(seq(0, 3*pi, length=1e2))) cols = matrix(hcl(h=scales::rescale(m, c(0, 360))), nrow(m)) grid::grid.raster(cols) You'll need to find which function describes the colour gradient that you want (I used sine waves for illustration). Edit: linear interpolation between 4 corners library(grid) ...


8

This is a bug in webkit -- see the bug report. The short answer is that for it's just broken. You may be able to work around this by keeping explicit references to the gradients you need to modify, e.g. var grad1 = defs.append("linearGradient");


8

This is a confirmed bug in Chrome. Given that it was first reported in 2010 (when Gecko actually had the same bug) and is currently marked WONTFIX I wouldn't hold my breath for a real fix. You could open a new bug, it might be 'doable' now. As a workaround: put the stripes on the table so as not to confuse the rendering mechanisms, then instead of styling ...


8

Solution You can actually achieve what you want without border-image property just by setting the following: table { background-image: linear-gradient(to bottom, red 0%, blue 100%); /* the gradient */ background-origin: border-box; /* set background to start from border-box */ border-spacing: 5px; /* space between each cell */ border: 5px solid ...


8

+[UIColor clearColor] is in fact transparent black. Since you want transparent white you should use: color1 = [[UIColor whiteColor] colorWithAlphaComponent:0.0].CGColor; If you read the documentation carefully to +[UIColor clearColor] it says that it will return a color with grayscale and alpha values 0.0. So the middle in your gradient from white to ...


8

Change your final step to #FFFFFF00 (rgba(255, 255, 255, 0)) instead of #00000000: http://jsfiddle.net/fYz45/6/


7

This happens because of the way gradient backgrounds are sized according to their containers (this includes both html and body), as well as the calculations used in determining the dimensions of html and body respective to the viewport. I've actually written about something similar before in an answer to another question. Yours is a little different, so ...


7

Maddening, isn't it? Prior to IE 11, filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient(startColorstr='#ffffff', endColorstr='#cccccc'); For IE 11: background-image: -ms-linear-gradient(top, #FFFFFF 0%, #CCCCCC 100%); That's right folks, we not only have to worry about supporting older IEs, apparently we'll now have to deal with NEWER IE quirks as ...



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