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5

Looks like everything is behaving as expected, but you are having problems selecting a reasonable learning rate. That's not a totally trivial problem, and there are many approaches ranging from pre-defined schedules that progressively reduce the learning rate (see e.g. this paper) to adaptive methods such as AdaGrad or AdaDelta. For your vanilla ...


3

You can turn "myForm" into a formula using as.formula(): myForm <- "Species~Petal.Length" class(myForm) # [1] "character" myForm <- as.formula(myForm) class(myForm) # [1] "formula" myForm # Species ~ Petal.Length lda(formula=myForm, data=iris) # Call: # lda(myForm, data = iris) # Prior probabilities of groups: # setosa versicolor virginica # ...


2

You could use mplot3d. For a scatter plot, you can use something like fig = plt.figure() ax = fig.add_subplot(111, projection='3d') ax.scatter(xs, ys, zs)


2

The most common approach is to vary the color and/or size of the scatter symbols. For example: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt np.random.seed(2) ## generate a random data set x, y = np.random.randn(2, 30) y *= 100 z = 11*x + 3.4*y - 4 + np.random.randn(30) ##the model fig, ax = plt.subplots() scat = ax.scatter(x, y, c=z, s=200, ...


2

Is this what you want? ) Source: http://nbviewer.ipython.org/urls/s3.amazonaws.com/datarobotblog/notebooks/multiple_regression_in_python.ipynb


2

Here is one approach, adapted from ?raster::localFun set.seed(0) b <- stack(system.file("external/rlogo.grd", package="raster")) x <- flip(b[[2]], 'y') + runif(ncell(b)) y <- b[[1]] + runif(ncell(b)) # local regression: rfun <- function(x, y, ...) { d <- na.omit(data.frame(x, y)) if (nrow(d) < 3) return(NA) m <- lm(y~x, ...


2

If you want to take into account the correlation between the dependent variables, you probably need Partial least square regression. This method is basically searching for such projection of independent variables and such projection of the dependent variables, that the covariance between these two projections is maximized. See scikit-learn implementation ...


1

To determine this, you can use the superclasses function: superclasses('LinearModel') superclasses('GeneralizedLinearMixedModel') This will return the names of the visible superclasses for each case. As you'll see, both inherit from the abstract superclass classreg.regr.ParametricRegression. You can also view the actual classdef files and look at the ...


1

Its usually more robust to use the predict method of lm: f2<-data.frame(age=c(10,20,30),weight=c(100,200,300)) f3<-data.frame(age=c(15,25)) mod<-lm(weight~age,data=f2) pred3<-predict(mod,f3) This spares you from wrangling with all of the coefs when the models can be potentially large.


1

This is a mathematical/stats question, but I will try to answer it here anyway. The outcome you see is absolutely expected. A linear model like this won't take correlation between dependent variables into account. If you had only one dependent variable, your model would essentially consist of a weight vector w_0 w_1 ... w_n, where n is the number of ...


1

Try making the variables outside the expression. x2 = (x-k)*(x>k) lm( y ~ x2) Alternatively, you can use I() lm(y~ I((x-k)*(x>k))) I() takes whatever is inside literally and ignores other possible (mis)interpretations with whatever function it is inside of. If you don't have a well-defined k, then you will have to optimize something like ...


1

Following this example you could do this: lapply(1:3, function(i){ lm(as.formula(sprintf("y ~ x%i + x4 + x5", i)), a) })


1

GE is dropped, alphabetically, as the intercept term. As eipi10 stated, you can interpret the coefficients for the other levels in states with GE as the baseline (statesLA = 0.1 meaning LA is, on average, 0.1x more than GE). EDIT: To respond to your updated question: If you include all of the levels in a linear regression, you're going to have a situation ...


1

This isn't quite an answer, though possibly could be, if it turns out to demonstrate the issue. I can recreate data that looks like yours, but that works, as follows. set.seed(5) df <- data.frame(y=rnorm(100), x=addNA(rep(c(0,1), c(80,20)))) table(df$x) ## 0 1 <NA> ## 80 20 0 lm(y~x, data=df) ## Call: ## lm(formula = y ~ x, data = df) ...


1

Without knowing more about the data, number of records, etc, this code should run faster: import pandas as pd import statsmodels.api as sm import numpy as np gb = df.groupby('location_code')['amount'] x = sm.add_constant(range(1,7)) def fit(stuff): return sm.OLS(stuff["amount"], x).fit().params[1] / stuff["amount"].mean() output = gb.apply(fit)


1

myForm<-as.formula(paste("Species","Petal.Length",sep="~")) lgrIris<-glm(formula=myForm, data=iris, family="binomial")



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