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78

A linear search looks down a list, one item at a time, without jumping. In complexity terms this is an O(n) search - the time taken to search the list gets bigger at the same rate as the list does. A binary search is when you start with the middle of a sorted list, and see whether that's greater than or less than the value you're looking for, which ...


67

If your number X falls between A and B, and you would like Y to fall between C and D, you can apply the following linear transform: Y = (X-A)/(B-A) * (D-C) + C That should give you what you want, although your question is a little ambiguous, since you could also map the interval in the reverse direction. Just watch out for division by zero and you should ...


31

Think of it as two different ways of finding your way in a phonebook. A linear search is starting at the beginning, reading every name until you find what you're looking for. A binary search, on the other hand, is when you open the book (usually in the middle), look at the name on top of the page, and decide if the name you're looking for is bigger or ...


23

Tell your boss you can make it 50% faster, but it will take 6 months, and some money. Wait six months. Buy new hardware. Well, it makes about as much sense as a linear search through a sorted array! (More seriously, can you give us some clues about why no binary search?)


15

I would like to add one difference- For linear search values need not to be sorted. But for binary search the values must be in sorted order.


14

I'd recommend the package cvxopt for solving convex optimization problems in Python. A short example with Python code for a linear program is in cvxopt's documentation here.


13

import scipy.interpolate y_interp=scipy.interpolate.interp1d( x, y) print y_interp( 5.0 ) scipy.interpolate.interp1d does linear interpolation by and can be customized to handle error conditions.


12

Divide to get the ratio between the sizes of the two ranges, then subtract the starting value of your inital range, multiply by the ratio and add the starting value of your second range. In other words, R = (20 - 10) / (6 - 2) y = (x - 2) * R + 10 This evenly spreads the numbers from the first range in the second range.


12

Wow, so you have some training data and you don't know whether you are looking at features representing words in a document, or genese in a cell and need to tune a classifier. Well, since you don't have any semantic information, you are going to have to do this soley by looking at statistical properties of the data sets. First, to formulate the problem, ...


12

If l has all numbers between 0 and (length l) - 1 inclusive, then minout l is length l, otherwise, it lies in [0..(length l - 1)]. So minout l always lies in [0..(length l)], and only the elements of l which are in [0..(length l - 1)] are relevant. We can discard the remaining elements. Using this idea we can implement a linear-time divide-and-conquer ...


11

A generic way to find linear parts in data sets is to calculate the second derivative of the function, and see where it is (close to) zero. There are several things to consider on the way to the solution: How to calculate the second derivative of noisy data? One fast and simple method, that can easily be adapted to different noise levels, data set sizes ...


10

I assume the elements are comparable. Perform a selection algorithm for the: n/10th, 2n/10th, ..., 9n/10th, 10(n/10)th smallest elements1 These are your candidates. Check the #occurrences for each of them, and if one of them repeats at least n/10 times the answer is true. Otherwise, it is false. Proof: If an element appears at least n/10 times, then it ...


10

Since you can put known values after the last valid entry, add an extra element n+1 = max to make sure the loop doesn't go past the end of the array without having to test for i < n. static int linear (const int *arr, int n, int key) { assert(arr[n] >= key); int i = 0; while (arr[i] < key) { ++i; } ...


10

This is in fact two questions in one ;-) Feature selection Linear or not add "algorithm selection", and you probably have three most fundamental questions of classifier design. As an aside note, it's a good thing that you do not have any domain expertise which would have allowed you to guide the selection of features and/or to assert the linearity of ...


10

What you want is a Cubic Hermite Spline: where p0 is the start point, p1 is the end point, m0 is the start tangent, and m1 is the end tangent


9

So far you received multiple advices most of which state that linear search makes no sense on sorted data, when binary search will work much more efficiently instead. This often happens to be one of those popular "sounds right" assertions made by people who don't care to give the problem too much thought. In reality, if you consider the bigger picture, given ...


9

Yeah, this can be a little daunting when you're getting started. There's a good walk-through of the process in this ACTS tutorial from 2006; the tutorials listed on the PetSC web page are generally quite good. The key parts of this are: ierr = MatCreate(PETSC_COMM_WORLD,&A);CHKERRQ(ierr); Actually create the PetSC matrix object, Mat A; ierr = ...


8

Is there a reason why you have to do it in Python? If you do not have to then it is a lot more easier to do this in a modeling langage, see here. If you absouletly have to do it in Python then I would suggest PyGLPK or PyMathProg. I have been using GLPK for 8 years now and I highly recommend it, however I have never tried these Python interfaces so I ...


8

I have run over this exact same problem before. Stay with me here... This problem involves two parts: 1. Find the point at which they intersect to find where two lines intersect, we use the two equations of the lines: y = M1x + B1 y = M2x + B2 Using substitution: M1x + B1 = M2x + B2 M1x - M2x = B2 - B1 x(M1 - M2) = B2 - B1 x = (B2 - B1) / (M1 - M2) ...


8

A linear search works by looking at each element in a list of data until it either finds the target or reaches the end. This results in O(n) performance on a given list. A binary search comes with the prerequisite that the data must be sorted. We can leverage this information to decrease the number of items we need to look at to find our target. We know ...


8

As I understand your question, you want to write some function y = interpolate(x_values, y_values, x), which will give you the y value at some x? The basic idea then follows these steps: Find the indices of the values in x_values which define an interval containing x. For instance, for x=3 with your example lists, the containing interval would be ...


7

You are essentially just looking at a random permutation. Arrange your videos in one fixed list, and then, to create the playlist, produce a random permutation of that list and play the permuted list. A typical and efficient (O(n)) way to achieve such a permutation is via a Knuth Shuffle. (Practically, you can of course just create a random permutation of ...


7

It it is the x coordinate that requires interpolation. The y coordinates of B and D are equal on your diagram. D.x = A.x + (B.y - A.y) * (C.x - A.x) / (C.y - A.y); D.y = B.y; You should also make a provision for the case of C.y == A.y, where D.x could be anywhere between A.x and C.x. One way to do this is to not draw triangles, for which abs(C.y - A.y) ...


7

AFAIK there isn't a LogLogLogPlot, so the next best thing would be to take the logs of your data and plot those. You then have to come up with Ticks of your own. A rough version: tks = {1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500, 1000, 2000, 5000, 10000}; list = 10^RandomReal[{0, 4}, {100, 3}] ListPointPlot3D[Log[10, list]}, Ticks -> { {Log[10, ...


7

No, you're xoring an 8-bit color component value with another 8-bit value, along the lines of: 1010 1010 xor 1111 0000 ---- ---- 0101 1010 While a single xor operates on a two bits to produce another bit, doing that operation on multi-bit values means doing it on each bit in turn. See also this answer.


7

While getting True would be didactically appealing, it would also be divorced from the realities of floating-point computations. When dealing with the floating point, one necessarily has to be prepared not only for inexact results, but for all manner of other numerical issues that arise. I highly recommend reading What Every Computer Scientist Should Know ...


7

Let the array be X and let n = length(X). Put each element x in bucket number floor((x - min(X)) * (n - 1) / (max(X) - min(X))). The width of each bucket is (max(X) - min(X))/(n - 1) and the maximum adjacent difference is at least that much, so the numbers in question wind up in different buckets. Now all we have to do is consider the pairs where one is the ...


7

I'd hate to say it depends, but it... depends. The total size of your index on each is 14GB, which basically doesn't mean much of anything to SOLR. To get a real feel for performance what is the uniqueness of the terms indexed? An index of 14GB worth of data with the single word "cat" in it over and over again will be really quick. Also have you confirmed ...


7

The linear library exports an instance of Num a => Num (V3 a), so you can actually just do > point * 2 V3 2 4 6 If you use GHCi, you can see what it means for 2 :: V3 Int: > 2 :: V3 Int V3 2 2 2 So the implementation of fromInteger for V3 would look like fromInteger n = V3 n' n' n' where n' = fromInteger n This means you can do things like ...


6

How about Rcpp? library(Rcpp) cppFunction(depends='RcppArmadillo', code=' arma::mat fRcpp (arma::mat A, arma::mat b) { arma::mat betahat ; betahat = (A.t() * A ).i() * A.t() * b ; return(betahat) ; } ') all.equal(f1(A, b), f2(A, b), fRcpp(A, b)) #[1] ...



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