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66

A line feed means moving one line forward. The code is \n. A carriage return means moving the cursor to the beginning of the line. The code is \r. The separation comes from typewriter times, when you turned the wheel to move the paper to change the line and moved the carriage to restart typing on the beginning of a line. This was two steps. Windows editors ...


45

System.Environment.NewLine is the constant you are looking for - http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.environment.newline.aspx


39

Java only knows about the platform it is currently running on, so it can only give you a platform-dependent output on that platform (using bw.newLine()) . The fact that you open it on a windows system means that you either have to convert the file before using it (using something you have written, or using a program like unix2dos), or you have to output the ...


28

The difference between '\r' and '\n' is 3.


23

The Difference There are a few characters which can indicate a new line. The usual ones are these two: * '\n' or '0x0A' (10 in decimal) -> This character is called "Line Feed" (LF). * '\r' or '0x0D' (13 in decimal) -> This one is called "Carriage return" (CR). Different Operating Systems handle newlines in a different way. Here is a short list ...


22

Historically when using dot-matrix printers CR would return the carriage to the first position of the line while LF would feed to the next line. Using CR+LF in the file themselves made it possible to send a file directly to the printer, without any kind of printer driver.


21

By default, HTML elements ignore whitespace. You need to change that: .break:after { content:"\000A"; white-space: pre; }


17

\n is Unix, \r is Mac, \r\n is Windows. Sometimes it's giving trouble especially when running code cross platform. You can bypass this by using Environment.NewLine. Please refer to What is the difference between \r, \n and \r\n ?! for more information. Happy reading


16

You can set the delimiter using the special variable $/: local $/ = "\r" # CR, use "\r\n" for CRLF or "\n" for LF my $line = <FILE>; See perldoc perlvar for further information. Another solution that works with all kinds of linebreaks would be to slurp the whole file at once and then split it into lines using a regex: local $/ = undef; my $content ...


16

Have a look at Wikipedia: Systems based on ASCII or a compatible character set use either LF (Line feed, '\n', 0x0A, 10 in decimal) or CR (Carriage return, '\r', 0x0D, 13 in decimal) individually, or CR followed by LF (CR+LF, 0x0D 0x0A). These characters are based on printer commands: The line feed indicated that one line of paper should feed out of the ...


16

As Nishant already pointed out in the comments, you've found a bug here. This bug initially was reported in 2004 (>9 years ago!?!!) and this bug seems not to be fixed very soon (or ever). I tested it on several Eclipse version, even on Eclipse Juno SR2, and the bug is still there.


16

\f is used for page break. You cannot see any effect in the console. But when you use this character constant in your file then you can see the difference. Other example is that if you can redirect your output to a file then you don't have to write a file or use file handling. For ex: Write this code in c++ void main() { clrscr(); ...


14

Because it just isn't. \r means "carriage return". \n means "new line" line feed Some systems are wise enough to suggest that all they need to get the cursor to a new line is \n. Others think that it's more appropriate to go \r\n, because, they may claim that the column position needs to be reset as well (i.e. the \r). Sometimes in computing things are ...


13

Remember that these codes all came from old Teletype machines. These were effectively typewriters: it was necessary both to advance the paper by a line (line-feed), but also to return the print head (on the carriage) to the left side of the paper (carriage-return).


11

JavaDoc Says public String readLine() throws IOException Reads a line of text. A line is considered to be terminated by any one of a line feed ('\n'), a carriage return ('\r'), or a carriage return followed immediately by a linefeed. Returns: A String containing the contents of the line, not including any line-termination ...


10

Your question says you only care about DISPLAYING them on separate lines, not specifically about replacing the \r\n. You could consider css to solve this problem. <style> tr { white-space:pre-line; } </style> See how the different white-space values work.


9

It comes from the teletype machines (and typewriters) from the days of yore. It used to be that when you were done typing a line, you had to move the typewriter's carriage (which held the paper and slid to the left as you typed) back to the start of the line (CR). You then had to advance the paper down a line (LF) to move to the next line. There are ...


9

Here's the standard line separators by OS: Windows: '\r\n' Mac (OS 9-): '\r' Mac (OS 10+): '\n' Unix/Linux: '\n' What that means is that if you hard code your line separators as \n, you're going to get the expected results in Linux and OS X, but Windows won't recognize the line endings properly. However, by using the more general line.separator to ...


8

On old paper-printer terminals, advancing to the next line involved two actions: moving the print head back to the beginning of the horizontal scan range (carriage return) and advancing the roll of paper being printed on (line feed). Since we no longer use paper-printer terminals, those actions aren't really relevant anymore, but the characters used to ...


8

"\n" is just a line feed (Unicode U+000A). This is typically the Unix line separator. "\r\n" is a carriage return (Unicode U+000D) followed by a line feed (Unicode U+000A). This is typically the Windows line separator.


8

Try using java -Dline.separator=$'\n'. That should do the trick, at least in bash. Here is a test-run: aioobe@r60:~/tmp$ cat Test.java public class Test { public static void main(String[] args) { System.out.println("\"" + System.getProperty("line.separator") + "\""); } } aioobe@r60:~/tmp$ javac Test.java && java ...


7

The accepted answer isn't exactly accurate. In point of fact, \n means 'linefeed', not 'new line'. The distinction is important because both symbols hearken back to the days of teletypes as the primary output for a computer instead of a CRT or LCD. For a teletype, the act of moving the print head back to column 1 and the act of feeding the paper up 1 line ...


7

Use a java.util.Scanner. Scanner scanner = new Scanner(new File(flatFile)); scanner.useDelimiter("\r\n"); while (scanner.hasNext()) { String line = scanner.next(); String cells[] = line.split("\t"); System.out.println(cells.length); System.out.println(line); }


7

Consider an IBM 1403 impact printer. CR moved the print head to the start of the line, but did NOT advance the paper. This allowed for "overprinting", placing multiple lines of output on one line. Things like underlining were achieved this way, as was BOLD print. LF advanced the paper one line. If there was no CR, the next line would print as a ...


7

Incorrect line endings are a frequent annoyance. For example, this is what Windows Notepad shows when writing a file with \n instead of \r\n (Windows' line.separator): Those little boxes were supposed to be line breaks. The other way around, when \r\n is used in place of \n (Unix' line.separator), is way worse, and breaks shell scripts and config files ...


6

A carriage return \r moves the cursor to the beginning of the current line. A newline \n causes a drop to the next line and possibly the beginning of the next line; That's the platform dependent part that Alexei notes above (on a *nix system \n gives you both a carriage return and a newline, in windows it doesn't) What you use depends on what you're trying ...


6

To be in phase with the BufferedReader class, you may use the following method that handles \n, \r, \n\r and \r\n end line separators: public static String retrieveLineSeparator(File file) throws IOException { char current; String lineSeparator = ""; FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(file); try { while (fis.available() > ...


6

If you get this wrong, you WILL mess up your ability to exchange data with other applications. You need to understand when you can get away with assuming that Java will help you... and when you can't. Linux applications normally use only the linefeed character (\n) as its line break. Windows applications use the combination of carriage return followed by ...



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