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7

The key fact that was added to this question is the fact that the two modules with the duplicate symbol were linked into a static library. A static library works very different than a shared library. When linking, the linker searches static libraries for referenced symbols. The first module that defines the referenced symbol gets linked to produce the final ...


4

First off, since you're violating the "One Definition Rule" (C++11 3.2/5 "One definition rule" says that separate class definitions in different translations units must "consist of the same sequence of tokens"), anything goes as far as the toolchain is concerned. it could diagnose an error, or produce a program that appears to work (as in your test). A ...


4

You shouldn't use --emit=obj; just rustc --crate-type=staticlib -C panic=abort sum.rs should do the right thing. (This fixes the _ZN4core9panicking5panic17h907815f47e914305E link error.) To fix another link error, you need to write panic_fmt correctly (note the use of extern): #[lang="panic_fmt"] extern fn panic_fmt(_: ::core::fmt::Arguments, _: &'...


3

The debugging functions from debug_report_ext are not part of the Vulkan core. You need to dynamically load them from the instance via vkGetInstanceProcAddr after making sure that it's actually supported: PFN_vkCreateDebugReportCallbackEXT CreateDebugReportCallback = VK_NULL_HANDLE; CreateDebugReportCallback = (PFN_vkCreateDebugReportCallbackEXT)...


3

Standard, section [basic.def.odr]: There can be more than one definition of a class type [snip] in a program provided that each definition appears in a different translation unit, and provided the definitions satisfy the following requirements. Given such an entity named D defined in more than one translation unit, then — each definition of D ...


2

The proper mental model for a static library is as a bag of object files. The linker looks for a symbol in the libraries only if it isn't yet defined. Or in other words, you could also define printWhatever() in the file that contains main.cpp and it will never look in the libraries for that symbol. Whether you link them or not, you'll likewise get no ...


1

There are shouldn't be any relocation entries related to x because your code doesn't use it. Nevertheless it presents in symbol table, and you can check it with objdump -t Saying in few words - relocation entry is the thing that helps your code to reference to some object, to link against them. So, if you don't reference x in your code - there won't be any ...


1

The linker only resolves symbols. Each C++ file is compiled independently, with whatever declarations are brought in via #include statements, to build up symbols (in a .o file), then the linker just works on the compiler output. C++ access modifiers such as private, protected, and public affect only the compiler, not the linker. (Technically, the linker ...


1

Try with -lsbuf in your compile command?


1

First, packaging all dependencies with the project itself is generally a bad idea, but for game-like applications there could be exceptions. In your case, the problem is not within packaged SFML, but libudev library. This library is Linux-specific (not cross-platform) Can't be linked statically (well, it probably could, but i bet it is a very bad idea, ...


1

The problem is that you are linking against the static version of the library but building against the shared version (DLL) of the library. When building against the shared version symbols are exported using __declspec(export) (or a .def file) which causes the compiler to add __imp to the beginning of the exported symbol name. Te resolve this you can add ...


1

You're misunderstanding the output of nm. Scroll through man nm and you'll you read that the t flag means the symbol is a local (static) symbol in the text section. The linker can't see it. If it were global (external) the flag would be T. So all four of your functions are local. Contrast: $ clang -shared -fPIC -fvisibility=hidden -o libdefaultvisibility....


1

I believe you are assuming that a "device code only" file (such as your shared.cu) contains no host code. This is not actually correct. A kernel function generates both host and device code constructs, and these constructs are generated by the CUDA preprocessor (cudafe) and split apart. Refer to the CUDA compilation trajectory in the documentation. ...


1

You have a typo. You should use -lpthread instead of -lpthreads. Alternatively you can just use -pthread, that also works.


1

Generally the warning about __fe_def_env occurs when building a shared library and the linker option -bexpfull is used. See the linker documentation for more explanation of -bexpfull. The symbol __fe_def_env is defined in /usr/include/fenv.h: const fenv_t __fe_def_env = { FE_TONEAREST, 0, 0, 0, 0 }; so it is included in every object that includes fenv.h....



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