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0

this appears to me to be an issue with closures and loops. Id references the loop variable and will continue to do so, which means it changes and reads something like exp1 = exp1.Or(x => x.post_author == 3); exp1 = exp1.Or(x => x.post_author == 3); when unfolded. To fix that you could try: var exp1 = Predicate.FalseExpression<posts>(); ...


7

I believe your issue is to do with closure. The variable id is assigned to the expression and it updates to a newer value each time you loop. In order to use it you want to make an individually scoped variable. var exp1 = Predicate.FalseExpression<posts>(); foreach (long i in lstPA) { long id = i; exp1 = exp1.Or(x => x.post_author == id); ...


1

Looks like an instance of the foreach closure problem. You are passing two times the same ID to the database. Apply the fix described in the linked question: Copy id to a variable inside of the loop.


0

I got more accurate answer when i append ToLower() function. default: searchExpression = Expression.Constant(searchText.ToLower()); containsMethod = typeof(string).GetMethod("Contains", new[] { typeof(string) }); body = Expression.Call(propertyExpression, containsMethod, searchExpression); break;


2

I think that your first approach was cleaner and ok for simple, non-recursive cases. If you allow your wrapped functions to be aware of recursion, you can take it a little further and make the wrapper an argument to the function itself: class RecursiveFunctionWithCounter<T, TResult> { private readonly Func<T, ...


5

Well, you can do sidestep the rules using Interlocked.Increment: int i = 0; Expression<Func<bool>> expression = () => Interlocked.Increment(ref i) != 0; ... but I would be very cautious about doing so. I wouldn't expect many pieces of code which deal with expression trees to handle this terribly cleanly, given the side-effect involved. The ...


5

Just look at the signature of Queryable.Where: public static IQueryable<TSource> Where<TSource>( this IQueryable<TSource> source, Expression<Func<TSource, bool>> predicate ) so in order to pass the parameter to Where the simplest way is to require a Expression<Func<TSource, bool>>: public override ...


1

If you change your default case to use IndexOf instead of Contains, it should fix your problem: default: propertyExpression = Expression.Property(parameter, colName); searchExpression = Expression.Constant(searchText); containsMethod = typeof(string).GetMethod("IndexOf", new[] { typeof(string), typeof(StringComparison) }); ConstantExpression ...


0

So I found this post C# Using Reflection to copy base class properties and tried this instead, sometimes simple just works... not sure why this one will set the enum and also not blow up on the complex type. Perhaps its how the lambda expression interprets the object. It doesn't check the is assignable from for anything, in particular the enum type, it ...


1

So what you're trying to do is fake a Join in a way that makes it easy to make generic. It makes sense to use the Join extension method directly instead of trying to fake it with a Where clause. Not just because that's what Join is for, but because you simply can't do it generically the other way. The Join method in LINQ takes three Expression parameters ...


4

Your method may read something like this: IQueryable<dynamic> GetEntities<T>(IDbSet<T> entitySet, Expression<Func<T, IEnumerable<AuditLog>>> joinExpression) where T : class { var result = entitySet.SelectMany(joinExpression,(entity, auditLog) => new {entity, auditLog}); return result.GroupBy(item => ...


0

I think this would be the nicest way: joinExpression = (l, entityParam) => l.TableName == "SomeTable" && l.EntityId == entityParam.SomeTableId; Then change your where like this: .Where(l => joinExpression(l, entity)) Alternatively, something like this might work joinExpression = entityParam => (l => l.TableName == "SomeTable" ...



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