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4

You can try: var currencies = context.DbCurrencies .DistinctBy(x => x.CurrencyCode) .Where(c => c.CurrencyCode != null) // add filter to query .AsEnumerable() // execute query against database .OrderBy(c => c.CurrencyCode != "USD") // Move USD to the top of the list .ThenBy(c => c.CurrencyCode) // Then ...


4

You can use a custom comparer: return context.DbCurrencies.DistinctBy(x => x.CurrencyCode) .Where(c => c.CurrencyCode != null).OrderBy(c => c.CurrencyCode, new CurrencyCodeComparer()).ToList(); You need a new CurrencyCodeComparer class but you can reuse it: public class CurrencyCodeComparer : IComparer<string> { public int ...


2

First, create your nested query: var query= db.Table.Select(e=>new {e.FK, e.Attribute1, e.Attribute2}).Distinct(); After that, you can do this: int x=10; var result= from e in query group e by e.FK into g let count=g.Count() where count>x select new{FK=g.Key, Count=count}; When you call, for ...


2

Assuming users is type List<User> you just do users.ForEach(u => context.Users.Add(u)); though you don't need to use LINQ. You could just do context.Users.AddRange(users);


2

You don't need LINQ. You need to use AddRange instead of Add: context.Users.AddRange(users); Assumption: you're using Entity Framework and Users is of type DbSet<T>


2

What you are trying to do can be achieved with the following LINQ query: List<Tuple<string[], double[]>> result = tt.Select(x => Tuple.Create( x.Item1, x.Item2.Select((y, i) => y / tt.Count(z => z.Item2[i] > 0)) .ToArray())).ToList(); Here are the resultant doubles printed to console:


1

You don't need to do any fancy work. Just Fetch the entity/entities you wish to modify using Where/Single etc. Modify the entity/enttities. Call save changes on your DbContext. using (var db = new EmployeeDbContext()) //NOTE: FOR THE LOVE OF GOD USE A REPOSITORY OR CONTEXT FACTORY OR SOMETHING TO MAKE SURE THAT THE LIFETIME OF YOUR CONTEXT IS MANAGED ...


1

It doesn't have to be that complicated. The names appear to be the primary keys. Just figure out which of the names in the database are in your set of items to insert. Then insert them excluding the ones that existed. var excludedNames = new HashSet<string>( from i in db.Items where Items.Select(item => item.Name).Contains(i.Name) ...


1

One solution could be applying a join between those entities and include the PostTitle in the fields you want to group: var query= (from v in db.Views join p in db.Posts on v.PostID equals p.Id where DbFunctions.DiffDays(v.ViewDate,DateTime.Now)<=14 group new{v,p} by new {v.PostID, p.PostTitle, v.ViewDate} into g ...


1

You'll have to implement IComparable, IComparer or pass IEqualityComparer or some other way to ensure Distinct() works across your class' properties, but here's the essential linq: var result = (from t in tableList.Select(t => new { fk, attr1, attr2 }).Distinct() group t by t.fk into g select new { fk = g.Key, Count = ...



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