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4

var allKeyValuesButHealth = dict.Where(kv => kv.Key != "Health"); Since this is a deferred executed LINQ query it's a good idea to materialize it with ToList, ToArray or even ToDictionary if you want to use it multiple times.


3

You have the wrong order of parameters here: .Where((i, c) => (i > 0) ? (c != s[i - 1]) : true) should become: .Where((c, i) => (i > 0) ? (c != s[i - 1]) : true)


3

Something like this should work for you results.Where(x => filters.Contains(x.Result))


3

You can use Wherein combination with Any in this case: results = results.Where(x => filters.Any(f => f == x.Result)); https://msdn.microsoft.com/library/bb534972(v=vs.110).aspx Others ways: //Contains, see DAXaholic's post results = results.Where(x => filters.Contains(x.Result)); https://msdn.microsoft.com/library/bhkz42b3(v=vs.110).aspx //...


3

If the idea is to order by the last (i.e. max) message timestamp, the following should do the job: return friends.OrderByDescending(f => f.Messages.Max(m => (DateTime?)m.Time)) .Select(f => f.Name) .ToList(); Casting to DateTime? is needed to avoid exception when there are no messages for some friend. In general when you need to order ...


3

results.GroupBy(p => p.GroupName) .Select(g => new FinalModel { GroupName = g.Key, Properties = g.ToDictionary(item => item.Key, item=> item.Value) }); And in the case that for a given GroupName the keys are not unique and you'd want to avoid a "key already exists" exception ...


3

For months and using Linq: List<string> months = dates.Select(d => d.Date.ToString("MMMM")) .Distinct() .ToArray(); Information on the ToStirng format for the month name can be found on MSDN here. and for years: List<string> years = dates.Select(d => d.Date.Year.ToString()) ...


3

You have to iterate the List, either way. LINQ is not really useful for producing side effects, it is for querying collections. You can call your method with LINQ, but it will do the iteration (internally). So it is better that you use an explicit loop construct to convey the code intention clearly. With LINQ if your object has a instant method than ...


3

Try adding the missing || between r.Company.Contains(Company) and Mobile.Contains(rd.Mobile). And fix the indenting, that makes it much easier to see what's wrong. When I indented it, the missing operator stuck out like a sore thumb, and it's easy to see how the parens work. using (Entities db = new Entities()) { refer = db.Refferals.Where(r => ...


2

SelectMany should do the job: List<SomeEventDelegate> subscribers = subscriptions.Where(kvp => kvp.Key.IsAssignableFrom(someEvent.GetType()) ).SelectMany(kvp => kvp.Value) .ToList(); You can only do it with the chained-method-call syntax. You pass it a lambda that selects an IEnumerable<T> from the parameter, and as ...


2

With an extension method to simplify it (taken from here): static class DateTimeExtensions { public static string ToMonthName(this DateTime dateTime) { return CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.DateTimeFormat.GetMonthName(dateTime.Month); } } You can do this: var months = dates.Select(r => r.Date.ToMonthName()) .Distinct(); var years =...


2

You using Linq to Entities not just LINQ to objects. That`s the difference. Linq to Entities translates your Linq query into SQL query and it has no idea how to translate your constructor. Use initializer instead - Linq to Entity can handle that: var entries = Db.Devices.Select(x => new DeviceDetailsModel { DeviceID = x.DeviceID; IPAddress = x....


2

Let take the first query: var query = myUser.WorkSpace.Users.SelectMany(u => u.Schedules); If you look at the type of the query variable, you'll see that it is IEnumerable<Schedule>, which means this is a regular LINQ to Objects query. Why? Because it starts from materialized object, then accession another object/collection etc. This combined ...


2

The error is the (i,c ) in your where. You are using the following Enumerable extension (See MSDN) public static IEnumerable<TSource> Where<TSource>( this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, int, bool> predicate) Note that the index in the Func is the second parameter. I think the fastest method would not be using ...


2

First of all, you don’t need to mock the collection. Collections (arrays or lists) are tested well enough to trust on their implementation. Since your constructor expects an array, you need to pass an array. And the simplest way to do that is to simply pass an array. There is no reason to mock this at all. Changing the implementation details of the class ...


1

How about something like this: List<JObject> list = JObject.Parse(json) .Descendants() .Where(jt => jt.Type == JTokenType.Property && ((JProperty)jt).Value.HasValues) .Cast<JProperty>() .Select(prop => { var obj = new JObject(new JProperty("Name", prop.Name))...


1

You should use Contains() method on tags collection. Here you are: List<decimal> matchingDoors db.tags .Where(x => x.user_id == userId && (null == SystemId|| x.syid == SystemId)) .GroupBy(x => x.door_id) .Where(x => x.Any(y => tags.Contains(y))) //this is where magic .Select(x => x.Key).ToList<...


1

I believe are looking at it from the wrong angle. I think you don't need to mock the IEnumerable (Mock<IEnumerable<ITransitReportCountryFlowProvider>>) - IEnumerable has been testing front and back and besides you don't want to have to implement all its logic.. I think you should mock your own classes: Mock<ITransitReportCountryFlowProvider&...


1

You could use Distinct method already instead of your own method for this purpose: var str = "aaabcca"; var result = string.Join("",str.ToCharArray().Distinct()); Result: "abc" Edit:If you want to remove sequential duplicates you could try this code instead: var removesequential = string.Join("",str.Where((c, i) => i == 0 || c != str[i - 1])); ...


1

You Probably need to read the Docs before using a Method or a special overload: Type: System.Func<TSource, Int32, Boolean> A function to test each source element for a condition; the second parameter of the function represents the index of the source element So your code should be something like this: .Where((item, index) => (index >...


1

Use Contains result = result.Where(x => x.foo.Any(i => filter.Contains(i.bar)));


1

Try this: Find whichever item in result, if any of its inner class items is present in the filter list result.Where(item => item.Any(innerItem => filter.Contains(innerItem.bar))) Or in the other syntax: var output = (from item in result from innerItem in item.foo where filter.Contains(innerItem.bar) ...


1

You probably need simple Any and Contains methods, and you could do this. result.Where(x => x.foo.Any(f=> filter.Contains(f.bar));


1

If you prefer the query syntax (hence don't bother what exact method is used), why don't you just continue your query: List<SomeEventDelegate> subscribers = (from subscription in subscriptions where subscription.Key.IsAssignableFrom(someEvent.GetType()) from subscriber in subscription.Value select subscriber) ...


1

It's missing one**||** before Mobile.Contains(rd.Mobile) refer = db.Refferals.Where ( r => r.RefferalDetails.Any ( rd => ( Name.Contains(rd.Name) || rd.Name.Contains(Name) || LastName.Contains(rd.LastName) || ...


1

if price format is computed and always the same you can do as follow to calculate the price: var price = new List<string> { "$4,000.99","$20.99","$40,000.88"}; var sum = price.AsEnumerAble().Sum(x => double.Parse(x.Replace("$", "0"))); I just replace the $ with 0 and calculate the sum.


1

I thought you can use left join in linq as below. var list = from lb in ListB join la in ListA on lb.id equals la.id into ListC from lc in ListC.DefaultIfEmpty() select new { obj=la.id==null?lb:la }; It won't remove and replace the items, but it will give the same result ...


1

There are many ways to do this (based on the vague description) e.g.: use a,b,c in a class Triangle that has a property TriangleType But I have to say, the wording Write me a function that ... Is very misleading if OOP was what they were after. public enum TriangleType { Scalene = 1, // no two sides are the same length Isosceles = 2, // two ...


1

I suggest this design: An enumeration TriangleType. An interface like ITriangle { Type, Sides... }. 4 classes implementing ITriangle. ScaleneTriangle, IsoscelesTriangle, EquilateralTriangle, InvalidTriangle. These four class return appropriate TriangleType. A factory class like TriangleFactory and a Create method in it which takes 3 sides length ...


1

Presuming that you have a PersonList in your House-class you could use Enumerable.Any: var matchingHouses = from house in allHouses where string.Equals(house.Name, criteria) || string.Equals(house.ID, criteria) || house.Name.Contains(criteria) || house.PersonList.Any(resident => string.Equals(resident.Name, criteria)) ...



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