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0

Your question isn't quite specific enough but anyway, here's some code that will give you the quantities for each partnumber. var groupings = list.SelectMany(x => x.AdditionalPropertyList).GroupBy(x => x.PartNumber).Select(g => new { PartNumber=g.Key, Quantity=g.Aggregate((c, n) => c.Quantity + n.Quantity) } ); foreach (var g in groupings) ...


2

There are a few diferent ways to acomplish this. You can create a view on one of the databases that joins the two tables from different dbs, then it will be one object in Entity Framework. You can also get the objects from each table you want to join as in-memory objects first that are disconnected from EF. Obviously you want to filter as much as ...


1

The entity has a composite key and when you save the new entity one of the key column is null. EF does not support nullable keys (it throws) but apparently there is a bug in EF where this condition is not checked in this specific scenario and hence the NRE. You need to make sure that you are not returning null values in primary key columns.


0

This also works, but requires 'unwrapping' an IGrouping<x,y>: public static IEnumerable<String> Split(this String me,int SIZE) { //Works by mapping the character index to a 'modulo Staircase' //and then grouping by that 'stair step' value return me.Select((c, i) => new { step = i - i % SIZE, letter = c.ToString() }) ...


0

You are missing the check if user exists, normally you would do that by id. using (var dc = new DatabaseConnectionDataContext()){ if (dc.Users.Any(o => o.Username== tbUsername.Text && o.Password == tbPassword.Text ...){ ... }else{dc.AddNewUser(tbUsername.Text, tbPassword.Text, tbFirstname.Text, tbLastname.Text);} dc.SubmitChanges(); } ...


0

If your column is a VARCHAR, then you need to tell NHibernate to map it as AnsiString, otherwise it will send your parameter that you're querying through as a NVARCHAR and SQL server will then decide that it has to convert every VARCHAR value to NVARCHAR to do the comparison. Because SQL server has to convert each VARCHAR field in the table to NVARCHAR, it ...


3

Lambda expressions are basically a shorter way of writing anonymous methods. Therefore, the i in your lambda examples is the same thing as a parameter in an anonymous method. In other words, they are independent of one another, just as parameters of different methods are independent of one another. For the sake of readability, it may be worthwhile to ...


4

To elaborate a bit more, this is fine: MyList.Where(i => i.ID > 20).OrderBy(i => i.Name); Those two variables called i are completely separate and only exist within the context of their respective lambda expressions. However, this is not: int i = 0; MyList.Where(i => i.ID > 20).OrderBy(i => i.Name); Now those i's in your lambdas ...


1

You can store the UserId temporarily into a property and set CustomerNames to null, then use a loop after your query and change the value of CustomerNames: var projectedOrders = (from order in orders select new { orderId = order.Id, orderName = ...


4

You'll have to do it in 2 steps query the raw data from the database, and materialize it project onwards using your logic var projectedOrders = (from order in orders select new { orderId = order.Id, orderName = order.FriendlyName, ...


1

See: Variable Scope in Lambda Expression - MSDN Variables introduced within a lambda expression are not visible in the outer method. So in your case your Where clause, you declared i which is only visible inside the Where clause and thus independent of the one declared in OrderBy clause.


6

They are completely independent. Actually, each time you declare a lambda you declare also range variables, which are local to this labda expression. So the i in the Where(i => i.ID > 20) is completely different from the i in OrderBy(i => i.Name). In the first case i refers to the random element of MyList, and then i refers to the random element of ...


0

from et in employee_travel orderby et.empid select new { Employee = et.Employee, TravelRecord = et, //if you want objects Name = et.Employee.Name, Date = et.Date //if you want simple types } In that sample I chose to return the entity, but you can of course return names, dates, etc. And you can add more ordering if you need. Or you can just get the ...


0

Check this example : //loop through <ItemGroupData> to get both date and type value //from each iteration var items = from i in doc.Descendants(nsSys + "ItemGroupData") select new { date = (string)i.Element(nsSys + "ItemData").Attribute("Value"), type = (string)i.Elements(nsSys + ...


3

you need to specify the namespace of your element XNamespace ns = "http://Mynamespace"; this.RequestId = (string)doc.Descendants(ns + "RequestID").FirstOrDefault();


1

Here is an assumption. First left join, denoted as Extent2, is for the SELECT clause to retrieve all necessary fields from ClientCustomField table. This would be presented in the query anyway, no matter if there is an Include method call. Second left join, denoted as Extent3, is to retrieve CustomField table fields. As you can see it is not used anywhere ...


0

You really should use a ViewModel, I can't remember last time I used the ViewBag I'm also going to use Razor here, its syntax is much more terse. You don't need to use DisplayFor if you're just presenting the data: @foreach(var item in ViewBag.Data){ <tr> <td><img alt="" src="@item.Image" /><td> ...


0

Try something like: var convertedBars = bars.GroupBy(b => b.TimeStamp.Date).Select(g => g.GroupBy(b2 => (int)(b2.TimeStamp.TimeOfDay.TotalMinutes / 60))).Select(gb => new Bar() { TimeStamp = gb.FirstOrDefault().FirstOrDefault().TimeStamp, Open = gb.FirstOrDefault().FirstOrDefault().Open, ...


2

Try this, using an anonymous type for the grouping: group myData by new { myData.TimeStamp.Date, Hour = (int) myData.TimeStamp.TimeOfDay.TotalMinutes / 60 } into barData


0

Here's what I like to do with messy LINQ. It makes it much easier to read and debug. var allListBlockValues = mCache.ListBlocks.SelectMany(listBlock => listBlock.Value); var matchingListBlockValues = allListBlockValues.Where(e => listBlocks.Contains(e.Key)) Dictionary<long, IList<Cell>> ByBlock = new Dictionary<long, ...


2

It's a bit misleading since dictionaries have keys and values, but you'll get that error when trying to insert a null key into a Dictionary (you're allowed to have null values in a dictionary). I think you can filter out null values earlier on in your query so you don't end up with a null key later on. I added a condition for && e.Key != null. ...


1

Reformating the code a bit it looks like this: Dictionary<long, IList<Cell>> ByBlock = mCache.ListBlocks .SelectMany(e => e.Value) .Where(e => listBlocks.Contains(e.Key)) .Select(Block => new KeyValuePair<long, IList<CellToSubCatchment>>( Block.Key, ...


0

In your query you select from context.db.Name, whereas you should select from context.db, otherwise select c.Name would mean context.db.Name.Name Entities dbo = new Entities(); var query = from c in dbo.database1 where c.id == id select c.Name;


1

I think you are probably trying to filter between those dates and then order by descending date. Try this: if (query.endDate != null) { data = data.Where(c => c.UploadDate <= query.endDate).Take(pageSize); } if (query.startDate != null) { data = data.Where(c => c.UploadDate >= ...


2

Have you try this data.Where(c => c.UploadDate >= query.startDate).OrderByDescending(c => c.UploadDate)


5

You're a little bit off here. First of all, if you reorder the list 4 times, the first 3 will have been a waste of time. I'm not sure what your logic is there, so I'll leave it at that. You need to rethink your filtering logic. Secondly, the Func that you pass to OrderByDescending gets the key to order by; it doesn't perform filtering. So when you do: data ...


3

You're not ordering by dates.. you're ordering by a boolean expression. data = data.OrderByDescending(c => c.UploadDate <= query.endDate).Take(pageSize); // ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ bool I can't quite understand what you're trying to achieve there.. but that's your issue. If you can expand a little more I can ...


0

You should write your own ToStringList method. ToList is an extension method so you should write ToStringList as an extension method too, extending IEnumerable(Of String).


2

It is not clear what semantic you had in mind with your where condition. I see two possibilities: You want to apply dc.ColumnName.Contains(...) to every key in the dictionary, or You want to check dc.ColumnName against the existing dictionary keys, I discuss both situations below. Here is how you match a string against a set of keys: where ...


2

Vice versa: where columnsMappingDictionary.Keys.Contains(dc.ColumnName))


0

string xml = @"<CustomActions> <CustomAction Id='MsCrm.deal.Form.Clone.CustomAction' Location='Mscrm.Form.deal.MainTab.Save.Controls._children' Sequence='46'> <CommandUIDefinition> <Button Alt='$LocLabels:MsCrm.deal.Form.Clone.Alt' Command='MsCrm.deal.CloneCommand' ...


0

Read the object graph using AsNoTracking(), then it is just a matter of adding it and saving, no worries about order or state, I used this to implement a SaveAs feature in a recent project: var myGraph = tableA.Where(c => c.Id == id) .Include(c => c.childA) .Include(c => c.childB) .Include(c => ...


0

I tested this and it worked String s = @"<ImportExportXml><Entities><Entity><Name>new_test</Name><EntityInfo></EntityInfo><RibbonDiffXml></RibbonDiffXml></Entity></Entities></ImportExportXml>"; var xdoc = XElement.Parse(s); var f = (from x in xdoc.DescendantsAndSelf(@"Entities") ...


2

I haven't used aspx view syntax for a while but I believe you are missing the equals sign. You currently have this: <img alt="" src="<%item. %>" /> instead it should be this <img alt="" src="<%=item. %>" /> Notice the = before "item" Take a look here for more info ...


3

I've putted your xml into the Resources and used the following code to get the RibbonDiffXml-Element from the Entity-Element where the Name is 'new_test' XDocument document = XDocument.Parse(Properties.Resources.XML); if (document.Root != null) { IEnumerable<string> elements = (from entity in document.Root.Element("Entities").Elements() ...


1

If I get what you really want, I will try something like this: warning: dirty and not tested but I think this will help you. public class Code { public string Id { get;set; } public string Extension { get;set; } public string CodeStr { get; set; } public Code(string code) { CodeStr = code; Id = code.Remove(code.Length ...


0

If u have more than 2 tables it is important to order table joins. It can make big differences. First table should get a leading hint. First table is that object with most selective rows. For example: If u have a member table with 1.000.000 people and you only want to select female gender and it is first table, so you only join 500.000 records to next table. ...


0

I have a partial answer to my question. Adding DbLinqProvider=sqlite; to the SqliteConnection query string tells Linq-to-SQL to use SQLite commands, and fixes the "SELECT @@IDENTITY" issue. This code works: Status data = GetStatusFoo(); using (SqliteConnection con = new SqliteConnection("Data Source=" + Config.SQLITE_DB_FILE + ";DbLinqProvider=sqlite;")) ...


0

I often find usages for an extension method I've created called SelectPairs(), and also in this case: public static IEnumerable<Tuple<T, T>> SelectPairs<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source) { return SelectPairs(source, (t1, t2) => new Tuple<T, T>(t1, t2)); } public static IEnumerable<TResult> SelectPairs<T, ...


0

SELECT DISTINCT personId FROM questionanswer WHERE questionId IN(SELECT questionId FROM questionanswer WHERE questionId = 1 AND response = 'red') AND questionId IN(SELECT questionId FROM questionanswer WHERE questionId = 3 AND response = 'green')


0

Linq extension method: public static bool ContainsAny<T>(this IEnumerable<T> Collection, IEnumerable<T> Values) { return Collection.Any(x=> Values.Contains(x)); } Then you can use like: List<string> List1 = getStringList1(); List<string> List2 = getStringList2(); bool List2ItemsInList1 = List1.ContainsAny(List2);


0

Linq extension method. Will work with any IEnumerable object: public static bool ContainsAny<T>(this IEnumerable<T> Collection, IEnumerable<T> Values) { return Collection.Any(x=> Values.Contains(x)); } Usage: string[] Array1 = {"1", "2"}; string[] Array2 = {"2", "4"}; bool Array2ItemsInArray1 = ...


0

How are you passing in the QuestionIds and Responses? Let's assume you eventually get them into a table variable: DECLARE @Search TABLE ( questionId int, response varchar(30) ) Then your SQL then becomes: SELECT q.personID FROM questionanswertable AS q INNER JOIN @Search AS s ON s.questionId = q.questionId AND ...


0

This would be better. Isn't it? var controls = (from Control control in this.Controls select control.GetType().ToString()).Distinct(); this.listBox2.Items.AddRange(controls.ToArray());


0

SELECT DISTINCT personID FROM questionanswertable WHERE questionID = 3 AND response = 'green' AND personID in ( SELECT DISTINCT personID FROM questionanswertable WHERE (questionID = 1 AND response = 'red'))


0

SELECT DISTINCT personID FROM questionanswertable WHERE (questionID = 1 AND response = 'red') OR (questionID = 3 AND response = 'green')


0

Your XML has default namespace declaration here : <variablesAutounityQuoteInqRq xmlns="http://www.ACORD.org/standards/PC_Surety/ACORD1.2.0/xml/"> That means, above element and all of it's descendant without prefix (and without a different default namespace declared) considered in the same namespace. Therefore, <EmpId> element is ...


0

A let statement that is not used should have no impact on your query. To be sure, turn logging on and see for yourself in the console output that the generated TSQL is identical for both queries: myContext.Log = Console.Out;


0

Creating a custom IComparer would work for you. Check this implementation: http://zootfroot.blogspot.com/2009/09/natural-sort-compare-with-linq-orderby.html You code would then call myLinqQuery.OrderBy(item => item.sortProperty, new MyComparer<string>()) In his example, the sort order return: image1.jpg image4.jpg image30.jpg image200.jpg


0

With linq2Sql or EntityFramework, you would probably do something like this: var query = from i in db.Item select new {i.name, i.Category.Name} This will generate a proper SQL inner join. I do assume that there is a foreign key relation between Item and Category defined.



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