New answers tagged

0

In order to be easy to follow your query, I extract this 2 models: public class Result { public string ParentName { get; set; } public string Type { get; set; } public List<CustomSubVariant> CustomSubvariantList { get; set; } } public class CustomSubVariant { public int SourceId { get; set; } public int TargetId { get; set; } ...


0

if items are fixed: public List<OrderViewModel> GetCustOrders() { var query = orders .GroupBy(c => c.CustomerName) .Select(o => new OrderViewModel{ CustomerName = o.Key, Shoe = o.Where(c => c.OrderType == "Shoe").Count(c => c.CustomerId), Hat = o.Where(c => c.OrderType == "Hat")....


2

group clause (C# Reference) var summary = from order in dbContext.Orders group order by order.CustomerId into g select new { CustomerName = g.First().CustomerName , Shoe = g.Count(s => s.OrderType == "Shoe"), Hat = g.Count(s => s.OrderType == "Hat"), ...


0

Here is how I do it, any better answers are welcome. public static DataTable GetErrorLog(int startRowIndex, int maximumRows, string sortExpression, string logPath) { if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(sortExpression)) { sortExpression = "fileName DESC"; } DataTable errorLog = GetErrorLogDataTable(); string[] filePaths = Directory....


0

why you do not go for the simplest way: public enum IntervalUse { Hourly, Daily, Weekly } public static class EnumExt { public static string GetDescription(this IntervalUse item) { switch (item) { case IntervalUse.Hourly: return "Hour by ...


0

I'm assuming you are using an Entity Data Model (edmx file) in a WCF Data Service. (because you are using the "Expand" function.) If this is the case.... You can create a complex data type (via the edmx Model Browser) then add all the needed column types to this complex data type. You then create a custom function in your data service that passes back data ...


0

It may not be a bad idea to write an enum extension method if it's something you're going to need often : public static string Describe(this Enum enumVal) { var type = enumVal.GetType(); var memInfo = type.GetMember(enumVal.ToString()); var attributes = memInfo[0].GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DescriptionAttribute), false); return (attributes....


0

Since LINQ doesn't know about that extension method, you will have to enumerate first, then get the attribute using reflection. public static class EnumExtensions { public static string GetDisplayName(this Enum value) { var attribute = (DisplayNameAttribute) value.GetType() .GetField(value.ToString()) ....


0

I'd use the System.Reflection libraries. public static GetMyEnumDisplayName(MyEnumType value) { var displayAttribute = value.GetType() .GetTypeInfo() .GetDeclaredField(result) .GetCustomAttribute(typeof(DisplayAttribute)); if (displayAttribute != null) { var Name = ((DisplayAttribute)displayAttribute)....


1

The exception occurs when you make the projection (i.e. select new CustomSearch) And yes your trying to assign Null to some int property (Not sure which one of your properties that is) one of 2 choices : 1) Use nullalbe types for your properties (or just that one property). 2) project with an inline If ( ?? in C#) , I don't know VB so don't catch me on ...


0

select top(1) post from posts P join 3rdTABLE T on P.ID= T.ID where T.user_id='123456' order by when DESC In above you can pass @User_ID as parameter or declare @User_ID BIGINT and change **where T.user_id='123456'** To **where T.user_id=@user_id**


0

How about not using the interface at all - Dynamic Linq is late bound anyway. You can apply the dynamic Where on IQueryable<T> and the result will be IQueryable<T>. As soon as you can build the string predicate correctly, the following should work: query = query.Where("Header.Title.Contains(@0)", filter.Value);


0

Using LINQPad, I ran the following linq expression against one of my databases: Personnels.Where(x => x.LastName == "Doe").Where(x => x.FirstName == "John") Which results in the following t-sql: -- Region Parameters DECLARE @p0 VarChar(1000) = 'John' DECLARE @p1 VarChar(1000) = 'Doe' -- EndRegion SELECT [t0].[FirstName], [t0].[LastName] FROM [...


2

AND. But you can use AND var test = db.table.Where(x=>x.id == x && x.name == name).ToList(); OR var test = db.table.Where(x=>x.id == x || x.name == name).ToList();


0

This is the same of doing separated operations: var numbers = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 }; var biggerThanThree = numbers.Where(x => x > 3); // [4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] var smallerThanSeven = biggerThanThree.Where(x => x < 7); // [4, 5, 6] I'm not going into lazy execution here, to make things simple. But the second .Where ...


0

You can use below methods in LINQ, To get data using LIKE operator in SQL Example : 1) if you want to get data starting with some letter we are using In SQL :- select * from People where firstname LIKE '%abc'; In LINQ : - db.People.Where(p => p.firstname.StartsWith(abc)); 2) if you want to get data contains any letter we are using In SQL ...


-1

You can use ProjectTo a Queryable Extension of the AutoMapper. db.Persons.ProjectTo<PersonDTO>().ToList()


0

testInt.Where(i => i > 0).Sum() If you really insist on a lambda you can pass to Sum directly then testInt.Sum(i => i > 0 ? i : 0)


0

You can chain multiple Linq extension methods along the way: decimal r = intArr.Where(i => i > 0).Sum(); This sums all the results that are filtered by the Where function.


3

The statement inside sum does not select which elements in the collection to sum, it selects which field on the object to sum. What you actually want is: decimal result2 = testInt.Where(i => i > 0).Sum()


0

int[] temp = testInt.Where(p=>p>0).ToArray()


1

The element you pass on the lambda expression (i on the sample), it is your element on the collection, in the case, the int value. For sample: int[] temp = testInt.Where(i => i > 0).ToArray(); You also can use by index passing the lambda expression which takes the index on the element. It's not a good pratice, using the element you already have on ...


6

i is the array element: int[] temp = testInt.Where(i => i > 0).ToArray(); Where accepts a function (Func<int, bool>) then Where iterates through each element of the array and checks if the condition is true and yields that element. When you write i => the i is the element inside the array. As if you wrote: foreach(var i in temp) { if( ...


0

Just wrap x.Average in Math.Round .Select(x => new GetLocationsAverageDTO { LocationName = x.Key.Location, Average = Math.Round(x.Average(f => f.Numeric), 2) })


0

I don't really know if the Rounding is translated in SQL-Providers, but you can do an in-Memory iteration and use Math.Round() which works in all cases: var dto = baseQuery.ToList(); foreach(var item in dto) { item.Average = Math.Round(item.Average , 2); }


1

You can simply apply the Math.Round() function that accepts a second parameter indicating the number of fractional digits you want to the end of your Linq query. Average = Math.Round(x.Average(f => f.Numeric), 2);


1

There are more complex ways of doing it, but I find this the easiest to read, especially for LINQ beginners: var first=true; foreach(DTOrder order in param.Order) { switch(order.Column) { case 0: if (first) { rows=(order.Dir=="asc")?rows.OrderBy(r=>r.Id):rows.OrderByDescending(r=>r.Id); } else { rows=(order....


0

Assuming an object like this: Public Class MyObject Public Property Id As Integer Public Property Name As String End Class You can map it like this: Public NotInheritable Class MyObjectMap Inherits CsvClassMap(Of MyObject) Sub New() Map(Function(x) x.Id) Map(Function(x) x.Name) End Sub End Class


0

The exact method syntax equivalent of this query syntax from h in needHelp join g in ghosts on h[0] equals g[0] where h[1] == 21 select g is something like this: needHelp.Join(ghosts, h => h[0], g => g[0], (h, g) => new { h, g }) .Where(x => x.h[1] == 21) .Select(x => x.g); The query syntax uses so called "transparent ...


0

Your Join method isn't the translation of the query syntax you gave. Your query filter on h[1] (x[1] in the Join) but you select only y (g in your query) so the Where after that applies on the wrong thing. Here is the direct translation of your query : List<int[]> result = needHelp .Join (ghosts, x => x[0], y => y[0], (x, y) => new ...


1

Joins and Wheres are not interchangeable in general. If you read your expression chain "out loud", it would read something like this: first get me all arrays in ghosts that match up a first element with something in needHelp, and then select from that those arrays which have the second element equal to 21. So at the point after the Join, you are only left ...


1

You are using Contains on the wrong object. It would be the other way around: result = result.Where(x => projectsSearchViewModel.selectedBusinessUnit.Contains( x.Project.Revenue_Organization)); I had this assumptions: projectsSearchViewModel.selectedBusinessUnit is an IEnumerable. x.Project.Revenue_Organization is a string value (column in db ...


2

Assuming that Project.Revenue_Organization is a string you need to reverse the statement. The collection should contain the string but as you have it written its checking if the string contains the collection (which does not make sense). result = result.Where(x => projectsSearchViewModel.selectedBusinessUnit.Contains(x.Project.Revenue_Organization));}


3

Looking at the SQL , what you need is: p.FirstName.Contains(searchString) so your query would be: db.People.Where(p => p.FirstName.Contains(searchString)).ToList();


4

Exploiting side effects (group) is not a good practice, but can be helpful: int[] list = { 5, 10, 15, 40, 45, 50, 70, 75 }; int step = 5; int group = 1; var result = list .Select((item, index) => new { prior = index == 0 ? item : list[index - 1], item = item, }) .GroupBy(pair => Math.Abs(...


1

In my opinion, just write a function to do it. This is easier to understand and more readable than the Linq examples given in other answers. public static List<List<int>> Group(this IEnumerable<int> sequence, int groupDiff) { var groups = new List<List<int>>(); List<int> currGroup = null; int? lastItem = null;...


2

Assuming collection has an indexer defined, can be something like this: const int step = 5; int currentGroup = 1; var groups = list.Select((item, index) => { if (index > 0 && item - step > list[index - 1]) { currentGroup++; } return new {Group = currentGroup, Item = item}; }).GroupBy(i => i.Group).ToList();


0

I Managed to get the answer. Thanks for everyone helped :) var result = db.Task.Join(db.EmpTask, t => t.ID, et => et.TaskID, (t, et) => new { t, et }) .Select(m => new { ID = m.t.ID, Title = m.t.Title, XXXX= m.et.XXXX ...


1

Haven't tested this, but by reading the docs: IEnumerable<Dictionary<string, string>> dic = dataTable.Rows.OfType<DataRow>() .Select(row => dataTable.Columns.OfType<DataColumn>() .ToDictionary(col => col.ColumnName, col => row[col] != null ? row[col].ToString() : null)); You asked for a one-...


0

Can't you do some thing like that foreach(var correctParent in recordlist){ var grandChild = _entity.Menus.Where(x => x.ParentID == correctParent.MenuID).ToList(); //add your grandChild in a listOfAllGrandChild ... } Adding all your grandChild in a single entity and then sum both your grandChild and recordList, and do a distinct on it ?


0

Is this really one object? It looks like you have a BatchClaim object, that contains a collection of BatchClaimDetail objects. If you really want it roughly as is, I believe the following would work, although I don't have a testing environment available at the moment. results.GroupBy(x=>x.ClaimSystemNumber).SelectMany(batchClaim=> new BDRResult { ...


0

You can use a Where clause if you don't want to specify table4 twice: var allData = (from t1 in table1 join t2 in table2 on t1.Column1 equals t2.Column1 join t3 in table3 on t1.Column1.ToString() equals t3.Column1 join t4 in table4 on t3.Column1 equals t4.Column1 ...


1

To caveat this, I've not been a .NET dev for a few years now, so if there is a problem with the c# driver then I can't really comment, but I've got a good knowledge of Mongo so hopefully I'll help... Indexes Indexes will help you out a lot here. As you are ordering and filtering on fields which aren't indexed, this will only cause you problems as the ...


7

You are almost there: public static string PointArrayToString<T>(T[] array) => string.Join(" ", array); And for testing: List<string> list1 = new List<string> { "1", "2", "3", "4" }; List<int> list2 = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4 }; string[,] collection3 = new string[,] { { "a", "b" }, { "a", "c" } }; var result1 = ...


0

If you want to match which have a number, use RegExp: var pattern = \[0-9]\g; alert(pattern.test("BCE-456"));


1

You can use char.IsDigit and Distinct(instead of GroupBy) var res = tea.tblRegion_Uni.AsEnumerable() .Where(x => !x.Region.Any(char.IsDigit)) .Select(x=> x.Region) .Distinct() .ToList(); if you need to bind to list of objects, then: var res = tea.tblRegion_Uni.AsEnumerable() .Where(x => !x.Region.Any(char.IsDigit)) ....


1

You can do this: join the two collections and then specify how to convert to dictionary _sharedDocumentsAttachments.Join(TargetDocumentAttachmentMeta, document => document.DocumentId, tDoc => tDoc.targetDocument, (document, tDoc) => new ...


1

As per my comment I'm not sure why you aren't just casting as a decimal, as that's what you've stored it as in the DB. However, if you really want this as a double you can try: Convert.ToDouble(value) With the size of decimals you're passing in you should be fine. With very large decimals you run the risk of losing precision, but as I say, I don't think ...


0

var model = db.SalesOrderDetails .Where(e => e.SalesOrderHeader.OrderDate > startDate) .Where(e => e.SalesOrderHeader.OrderDate < endDate) .Join(db.Products, order => order.ProductID, product => product.ProductID, (order, product) => new { Quantity = order.OrderQty, UnitNet = order....


0

I guess the service returns the date in the French locale. You can use the fr-FR locale or provide a specific format to parse with. Use this overload of DateTime.Parse: DateTime.Parse(c.dateEcheance, new CultureInfo("fr-FR")) Or: DateTime.ParseExact(c.dateEcheance, "dd-MM-yyyy", new System.Globalization.CultureInfo("fr-FR"))



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