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0

Can you try this one? Just my 2 cents. var add = from u in db.UserImage where u.User_Id == id select u; foreach (var u in add) { u.Image = binaryObj; u.ImageObj = fileName; } db.SaveChanges();


0

I have this function that converts an object to a dictionary. It gets all the properties of the class, as the dictionary's keys. May be you can modify it to meet your needs: public Dictionary<string, object> ConvertClassToDict(object classToConvert) { Dictionary<string, object> result = new Dictionary<string, object>(); ...


1

There is no way, to my knowledge, to modify the SQL that gets generated by an EF provider. However, for those special cases, you can run SQL directly. context.Database.SqlQuery<SomeEntity>("select * from SomeEntity " + "some more custom sql here " + "where somecomlumn = @p1", parameter1); You just have to make sure whatever you return matches the ...


0

Yoda comparison for handle case when you have null in database: var count= dt.AsEnumerable() .Where(x => name.Equals(x.Field<string>("names")) && "true".Equals(x.Field<string>("port"))) .Count();


2

Enumerable.Count doesn't throw an error if the sequence is empty, it returns 0. Do you instead mean that dt can be null? So either the DataTable is null or one of the strings is null. You don't need to use String.Equals you can use == to compare strings meaningfully, then you don't get an exception. You can also use this shorter way using the overload of ...


0

Do this: var count=dt != null ? dt.AsEnumerable().Where(x => x.Field<string>("names").Equals(name) && x.Field<string>("port").Equals("true")).Count() : 0; It will simply check if dt is null before any operations on dt are executed.


0

You could compare string in C#, it will use alphabetically order: var find = ListDS.Where(c => c.Code.CompareTo(searchcode) >= 0) .OrderBy(c => c) // get closer one, need to order .First(); See the CompareTo docs. Note that with this method, "10" > "2".


2

I would use Sum instead of Aggregate: decimal total = orderDetails.Sum(x => (decimal) (x.quantity * x.unitPrice)); Depending on exactly what your situation is, I can imagine this potentially working without any casts, or needing more casts... it's not always easy to tell with dynamic.


0

I'm guessing this is what you need: var groups = from work in ctx.Works // the work table group work // we want to group whole work "rows" // we are grouping by project id and subproject id by new { ProjId = work.ProjId, SubProjId = work.SubProjId } into g // and we are calling the grouping 'g' ...


1

The compiler doesn't know the types of detail.quantity and detail.unitPrice, so you need to cast them. Also, you need another Aggregate overload, one with a seed value: decimal total = orderDetails.Aggregate((decimal)0, (workingTotal, detail) => workingTotal + ((decimal)detail.quantity * (decimal)detail.unitPrice)); Of course, you can use a ...


0

Since you're working with dynamics, the compiler doesn't know what detail.quantity, etc are. So you need to explicitly cast it to a decimal. decimal total = (decimal)orderDetails.Aggregate((workingTotal, detail) => workingTotal + (detail.quantity * detail.unitPrice));


1

I'm not sure what your code looks like so this might not be perfect but you could try something like this: var result = from work in works group work by work.SubProjId ?? work.ProjId into groupedWorks select groupedWorks.ToList(); or var result = works.GroupBy(work => work.SubProjId ?? work.ProjId).ToList();


0

try this query var itemlist =contex.Work.where(x=>x.SubProjId !=null).Groupby(x=>x.SubProjId).Concat(Contex.Work.where(x=>x.SubProjId ==null).Groupby(x=>x.ProjId)).ToList();


0

You can use Linq, Or Just regular XPath. This is the xpath for your xml : //product[./*[text()='123']]/Description/text()


0

Getting all of nodes as list and iterating over them is redundant in your case. You can get that description pretty easily like this: string myID = "123"; var description = reader.XPathSelectElements("/file/order/products/product") .Where(x => x.Element("id").Value == myID) .Select(x => ...


0

Try this solution: class Something { public string Code; public Something(string code) { this.Code = code; } } class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { List<Something> ListDS = new List<Something>(); ListDS.Add(new Something("test1")); ListDS.Add(new Something("searchword1")); ...


5

A prefix of @ allows newlines in-line: string myCode = @"MyClient client = new MyClient(); var result = Task.Run(() => client.For<Customer>().FindEntriesAsync()).Result.AsEnumerable<Customer>(); return JsonConvert.SerializeObject(result);"; And it even works with Stackoverflow syntax highlighting, how nice.


1

Here is a simple code may help you List<string> ls = new List<string>(); ls.Add("ddd"); ls.Add("adb"); var vv = from p in ls where p.StartsWith("a") select p; select all element with starting string "a"


3

Try this: String.Join(Environment.NewLine, text.Split(';'));


0

If Code is an int this might work: var find = ListDS.Where(c => c.Code >= searchcode).OrderBy(c => c.Code).First(); otherwise you need to convert it to one: int code = int.Parse(searchcode); var find = ListDS.Where(c => Convert.ToInt32(c.Code) >= code).OrderBy(c => Convert.ToInt32(c.Code)).First();


0

Not an expert on this, but this seems the solution in your case: Specify the UpdateCheck = UpdateCheck.Never on your column in your entity. This will disable the update check and will most likely fix your issue. Another option is to set cascade deletion on the table in the database.


-1

They are 2 different things. Where returns a new sequence of items matching the predicate. Any returns a Boolean value; there's a version with a predicate (in which case it returns whether or not any items match) and a version without (in which case it returns whether the query-so-far contains any items). In lambda sense they both are ...


-2

If you just want to check if there's a certain item in a list using .Where method is a very bad idea. This method (Where) is used only to get list of items not a single item. Use .FirstOrDefault() method and check for null value or use .Any() This test queries 500 times a List of 10000 items using each of three methods: Full image with code : ...


0

Any will be more correct in your case. Because Any will return true on first entity in collection which meets your condition, however FirstOrDefault will do the same in your case(from the performance point of view). The only case when FirstOrDefault can be more slow is when you use third party data connectors with bad implementation of translation linq ...


0

In theory lstEmployees.Any(cond => cond.EmployeeID == empID && cond.IsManager) should be faster or equal. Because it will do all necessary with one iteration loop. BUT in reality it much depends on LINQ provider. There is a chance that provider will optimize lstEmployees.Where(cond => cond.EmployeeID == empID).Select(col => ...


0

Any() will stop iterating at the first item that meets your condition and simply return a bool (true = found or false not found). Where() will continue through the whole sequence so that it can return a complete result of items where your condition matches. In Summary - Any() is your faster solution if you just need to know if a condition is true at least ...


1

lstEmployees.Any(cond => cond.EmployeeID == empID && cond.IsManager) It should be fast. It is only check to data available or not and return true or false. second method should return object so it slow.


1

Try this from t0 in MyTable From t1 in MyTable( x=>x.Fk_CompanyId=t0.Fk_CompanyId && x.CheckedUtc > t0.CheckedUtc ).DefaultIfEmpty() where t1.Fk_CompanyId == null && t0.CheckedUtc != null select new { cid = t0.Fk_CompanyId, cuct = t0.CheckedUtc, isbl = t0.IsBlocking }


0

Convert DateTime to String for comparison, for example: const string DATE_FORMAT = "yyyy/MM/dd"; var query = sampleTable.Where(x => x.DateTime.ToString(DATE_FORMAT) > DateTime.Now.ToString(DATE_FORMAT));


0

After long search the solution that is working for me public static class ObjectExtensionMethod { public static IQueryable Select(this IQueryable source, Expression<Func<dynamic, dynamic>> map) { try { var method = new Func<IQueryable<dynamic>, Expression<Func<dynamic, dynamic>>, ...


1

If I have understood you correctly, you are trying to fetch the name & description present inside the PlaceMark node. But, since you are only fetching Root.Elements() your query will only fetch the complete XML starting from your root node. You need to find the Descendants of PlaceMark node because you need to fetch the name & description inside ...


3

.HasValue returns a boolean. True if the property is not null. That won't work. Instead, try: .OrderBy(r => r.DateReleased) As @user2864740 pointed out in the comments, to ensure that the null values go to the end of the list, try: .OrderBy(r => r.DateRelease ?? DateTime.Max)


0

I was able to solve the issue by doing the following changes in the query: var querytable = (from table1 in db.ScrapClassifications join table2 in db.ScrapGroups on table1.idGroup equals table2.idGroup join table3 in db.ProdAreas on table1.idArea equals table3.idArea join ...


0

The problem is you can't do right joins in linq. The good news is you can rewrite your query to avoid using the right join. You do this by rearranging the tables and using left joins instead. Currently you are doing this: select ... from [MainTable] m inner join [InnerTable] i on m.Num = i.Num right join [RightTable] r on m.Num = r.Num left join ...


0

The problem is that your controller method for Query is expecting some data to be passed in the form of an object, but you aren't passing anything to it. If it's a GET request (and it appears to be because you just set location.href on click), the values would need to be in the query string. Alternatively you can make your form POST to that controller action ...


0

If I understand correctly you want something like this with orderby and take: CostCenter = g.Select(n => n.CostCenter).OrderBy(n => n.SomeField).Take(10)


1

Include doesn't allow projections, you can only include complete entities. But there is a way out. This is a typical case that you should solve by table splitting. By table splitting you "split" a table over two (or more) entities, so it's easier to filter e.g. light data from heavy data or public data from secure data. In your case the class model (for ...


0

Sorry if i did not understand your question, but i think you can specify what collumns you want in your select statement. Simpe example: var query = from c in Categories select c.Name, c.CategoryId;


1

It sounds like all you're missing is calling ToList or ToArray on the group: foreach (var group in groups) { List<string[]> pairs = group.ToList(); // Now you can access pairs[0] for the first item in the group, // pairs[1] for the second item, pairs.Count to check how many // items there are, or whatever. } Or you could avoid ...


1

I'm not sure if this is useful to you, but you can use the Dynamic Linq Library. This way you can easily construct queries at runtime and query using strings. More information found here.


0

if you get the timezone offset from the server you might be able to use EntityFunctions to apply the offset in your linq query var offset = TimeZoneInfo.Local.BaseUtcOffset.TotalMinutes; var result = db.Dates.Where(a => EntityFunctions.DiffDays(EntityFunctions.AddMinutes(a.Date, offset), DateTime.Now) == 0);


-1

You could probably use the predicate builder. For example: IQueryable<Product> SearchProducts (params string[] keywords) { var predicate = PredicateBuilder.False<Product>(); foreach (string keyword in keywords) { string temp = keyword; predicate = predicate.Or (p => p.Description.Contains (temp)); } return ...


1

The Count method you are looking for has only 1 parameter: public static int Count<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source) You could also use the Count property since the source is an ICollection: //build a lambda: (Bar bar) => bar.Data.Count > 1; var barParam = Expression.Parameter(typeof (Bar), "bar"); var barDataProperty = ...


0

I was a bit confused by the lambda statement at first. I did a simple fix. I created a list of strings and ran through a foreach to add the values in the CheckedItems list. I then used the string list to perform the lambda filter. protected void rcbProgram_SelectedIndexChanged(object sender, RadComboBoxSelectedIndexChangedEventArgs e) { ...


2

You only want 1 record per employee, so you need to group by the ID. Then you order your groups by the lastest year/month and select the first one var query = from e in db.Employees group e by e.EmployeeId into g select g.OrderByDescending(e => e.ForYear) .ThenByDescending(e => e.ForMonth) ...


0

I am assuming you want the record with the greatest ForYear and greatest ForMonth var result = (from db in MYDBContext orderby db.ForYear descending, db.ForMonth descending select db).First();


1

You have to parse the number to integer and then compare the range. You can also use Int.TryParse to save yourself from the exception. To do the parsing once, make an anonymous type and then query like: int temp; var query = myList.Select(r => new { Car = r, ...


0

In this case if the concern is performance well, you have a big long list of articles to read to have your own opinion. For once maybe you have to concern about if your column needs and index and if your statistics are updated. If your values are request and update as a string, evaluate if you need a related table to hold this values and have a related id ...


4

This is a pretty straightforward solution: myList .Where(car => startNumber <= int.Parse(car.No) && int.Parse(car.No) <= EndNumber) .ToList(); Note: If we can't assume No will only contains Natural numbers, than using int.TryParse will be a better alternative than int.Parse. Remarks: I highly recommend you to save No as int ...


2

I use LINQPad4 with: Customers.Where(x => x.Name == "Tom" || x.Name == "Dick").Dump() Generate: -- Region Parameters DECLARE @p0 NVarChar(1000) = 'Tom' DECLARE @p1 NVarChar(1000) = 'Dick' -- EndRegion SELECT [t0].[ID], [t0].[Name] FROM [Customer] AS [t0] WHERE ([t0].[Name] = @p0) OR ([t0].[Name] = @p1) IN vs OR is discussed here: IN vs OR in the SQL ...



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