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The kernel doesn't know which device the interrupt pertains to. It is possible for a single interrupt to be shared among multiple devices. Previously this was quite common. It is becoming less so due to improved interrupt support in interrupt controllers and introduction of message-signaled interrupts. Your driver must determine whether the interrupt was ...


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In any driver, it is not a good practice to disable the interrupts globally. Let the kernel handle it. You are free to disable the hardware interrupt for the particular GPIO line in the hardware (by writing some registers mostly) whenever you want. Make sure you have a mechanism to re enable them when you might need it again. While writing a driver, you need ...


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The kernel does not know that this particular interrupt is for a particular device. The only thing it knows is that it must call irq_handler with raspi_gpio_devp as a parameter. (like this: irq_handler(irq, raspi_gpio_devp)). If your irq line is shared, you should check if your device generated an IRQ or not. Code: int irq_handler(int irq, void* dev_id) { ...


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cdev is the char device representation of the kernel. The general idea is to associate cdev with a set of file_operations. These file_operations are performed on a device node, typically present under /dev. cdev_init() is used to associate/link a cdev with a set of file_operations. Finally cdev_add() is called on the device to make it live, such that, the ...


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Use __setup() macro. See for example __setup("ip=", ip_auto_config_setup); in net/ipv4/ipconfig.c


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Use the container_of macro: struct my_struct { int my_something; struct hrtimer my_timer; ... }; enum hrtimer_restart my_callback(struct hrtimer *hrtimer) { struct my_struct my = container_of(hrtimer, struct my_struct, my_timer); my->my_something = 42; ... }


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Its standard to use pr_{debug,warn,err}() with [drivername] prefixed. ex: pr_debug("kvm: matched tsc offset for %llu\n", data); Alternatively you can use dev_warn() ex: dev_warn(&adap->dev, "Bus may be unreliable\n"); Is there another way to filter dmesg by driver? Not unless you want to run dmesg -c to clear the logs, before getting ...


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vm_insert_page() allows drivers to insert individual pages they've allocated into a user vma. The page has to be allocate within the kernel independently. It requires the page be an order-zero allocation obtained for this purpose. It does not put out warnings, and does not require that PG_reserved be set. Traditionally, this was done with remap_pfn_range() ...


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Theoretically, speaking - you absolutely can end up with 0x00ff, or even 0xabcd. If two threads try to modify the value of an object, and these expressions are not sequenced (i.e. synchronized), the behavior of the program is undefined. Now, whether or not this can happen in practice - it really depends on the OS and hardware architecture, and although the ...


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As their name suggest vm_insert_page() map a single page, while remap_pfn_range() maps a consecutive block of kernel memory. Check the prototypes and comments vm_insert_page, remap_pfn_range For example, you can use vm_insert_page to map vmalloc aree do { page = vmalloc_to_page(vaddr); vm_insert_page(vma, uaddr, page); vaddr += PAGE_SIZE; } ...


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Correct, sysfs_notify() cannot be called from atomic context. And yes, sysfs_notify_dirent() appears to be safe to call from atomic context. The source you cite is a bug report that notices in an old kernel version that statement wasn't actually true, along with a patch to fix it. It now appears to be safe to call. Follow the source code in ...


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For my first question, I got an answer from the linux-usb mailing list. It turns out that 'epautoconf.c' does not change 'bEndpointAdress'. So I changed the value in the definition of 'bEndpointAdress' and it is correctly conveyed to the host now. Windows installs the UAC1 driver correctly when I use this configuration: ConnectionStatus: DeviceConnected ...


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If you mean the OpenFirmware device trees, those are packed into a special format (dtb image) and put in RAM by the bootloader, together with the kernel image. Bootloader then invokes the kernel entry point passing the address of the dtb image in RAM as one of the parameters. A kernel subsystem located in <kernel>/drivers/of subdirectory will then ...


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I last looked at L4 in depth many years ago. Based on my understanding the answer to your question should be in general a no. The reasons for this are mainly in two aspects: For one is because a fully bloated linux driver needs to take care of too many aspects to integrate into the kernel subsystems. The another reason is the two kernels are different. ...


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The usage pages supported by a device must be parsed out of the device's report descriptor. Windows does this for you when you call HidD_GetPreparsedData. There are two ways to get the report descriptor from the device: Open the /dev/hidrawN device node and use the HIDIOCGRDESCSIZE and HIDIOCGRDESC ioctls to get the report descriptor. Read the report ...


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It is almost certainly because your partitions are aligned to 8-block boundaries on the newer system, but not on the older system (you can examine the partition table in detail with sfdisk). Reads will be in units of the filesystem blocksize, which will be a multiple of the system pagesize (which is 4kB on the most common architectures). So if your ...


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Usually you need to install Linux headers. In your case it should be linux-headers-3.11.0-23-generic. According to the list you provided you did not install it. You can download the appropriate .deb file and install it with dpkg -i linux-headers-3.11.0-23-generic.deb And as a side-note: Yes, you can have multiple kernel at the same time. At boot time ...


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As per MII standards, your PHY chip will have basic mode control register at address 0x00. Look in PHY chip datasheet under 'PHY MDIO register Description'. In U-Boot either phy-chip driver ( example marvell, vitesse etc.) if found, otherwise generic phy-driver will perform the phy reset.


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There is the libnuma api which numactl uses. http://developer.amd.com/wordpress/media/2012/10/LibNUMA-WP-fv1.pdf Though you might bee making more work for yourself as sysfs has already organized this for you. In the kernel you can get the numa_node off struct device which is embedded in struct pci_dev. The sysfs accessor function is numa_node_show.



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