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8

You can try invoking lsb_release -i, but this is not guaranteed to work.


6

The functionality of the .NET framework is too rich to make sense to build it all on top of a bare Linux kernel without substantial userspace helpers starting with libc. Not impossible, but way too ambitious, IMHO, for a single student's PhD thesis (and much more so if you're aiming at a lower degree than a doctorate). Look at mono for a ...


6

There are 3 possible reasons you have shared libraries missing: you are using shared libraries which do not exist by default on the other distribution, or you have installed them on your host, but not the other one, e.g. libDBI.so you have over-specified the version at link time, e.g. libz.so.1.2.3 and the other machine has an API compatible (major version ...


5

To do this reliably and accurately is impossible, the best I can suggest is to take the output of 'uname -a' and use that. Note: This is not a Java limitation - there is simply no common (and accurate) means of identifying a distribution.


5

You're looking for " ".join(): >>> import platform >>> platform.linux_distribution() ('Ubuntu', '11.04', 'natty') >>> " ".join(platform.linux_distribution()) 'Ubuntu 11.04 natty' >>>


4

http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/2902 This is a working example of a buffer overflow that is from the book, The Art of exploitation' It works I have tried it. Great book by the way


4

Yes it's different, in CentOS 5.6, for example, python external modules are placed in /usr/lib/python2.6/site-packages. Actually dist-packages is debian specific directory.


4

What you are describing is the use of static libraries instead of shared libraries.


3

For the first part of your question you might want to checkout the mono project which is an implementation of .net in c#. As to the second part, I don't know why you'd want to implement the Linux Kernal in .net. It seems like a bit of a backwards way of approaching the thing. If you're interested in implementing an operating system in c# check out ...


3

Unless you have a specific desire to learn the ins and outs of various packaging formats you would probably be better off contributing directly upstream to applications/libraries that you find interesting. While individual distributions often have a few management applications that are unique(ish) to them most core applications and libraries are shared ...


3

I usually use the following command: cat /etc/issue Reading this file in Java should be quite easy. The question is whether this file is on every (or at least majority) of Linux distributions. I found it everywhere I needed it, though, it was not needed very frequently.


3

Yes you can The default quickly template for ubuntu application use pyGOBJECT which is available in all modern distros, So you don't have to worry about it. But if used ubuntu specific features like appindicator,unity integration etc, You have to make tiny changes in the source code before porting to another distro


3

It's really a matter of preference. Make your friend give you the reasons to switch. Fedora vs. Ubuntu for Software-Development Pros/Cons? A few helpful links http://www.diffen.com/difference/Fedora_vs_Ubuntu http://www.reddit.com/r/linux/comments/1aqorr/times_they_are_achangin_ubuntu_and_fedora_are/ ...


3

If you are in possession of a hardware with MIPS CPU that can run Linux, the easiest way would be to use one of the Linux distributions for MIPS architecture. A common one is Debian distribution, and you can find more about Debian for MIPS at this link. If you do not have access to MIPS hardware, running QEMU on your x86 host should be sufficient. Take a ...


2

An operating system is really a huge undertaking. There have been attempts to build a system to create custom OSs in C# called Cosmos, which I've considered looking into several times. In most cases though, applications probably would have to be specifically built for the OS. I may actually bother, now that you've reminded me. Obviously, the result would ...


2

This code can help you: String[] cmd = { "/bin/sh", "-c", "cat /etc/*-release" }; try { Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(cmd); BufferedReader bri = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader( p.getInputStream())); String line = ""; while ((line = bri.readLine()) != null) { System.out.println(line); } } catch ...


2

If you want to program kernel modules then it doesn't matter which distribution you choose. You will need to be able to recompile the kernel from source and install a new kernel yourself. Even just for a kernel module you'll want to be able to compile the latest kernel and develop against that, otherwise you won't be able to get the module accepted in to ...


2

If you want to work with the kernel then you shouldn't be picking a distribution, but rather working upstream.


2

There have been several technical solutions to the original problem noted here, e.g. compile multiple versions against different libc versions. or install the additional libraries on the other machines but if you're in the position of an ISV, there is really just one sane solution: Get a clean install of an older system, (e.g. Ubuntu 6.x ...


1

Somebody correct me if I'm wrong, but I think that contributing to Ubuntu can be very easy and fun if you use Launchpad. I haven't tried contributing code, but I contribute translations and file bugs on some projects.


1

One alternative is to dynamically load shared libraries using dlopen() and if it fails to load, exit gracefully with the message that the dependent library is required for the executable to work. The user then may install the appropriate library.


1

The CLR (aka .NET framework) has been implemented at least once on Linux, in Mono. True, you could make a Linux distribution which ships Mono, or uses .NET for some of its startup scripts / daemons. That would be fine. Someone has probably already done this. I don't see exactly what advantage trying to run managed code in the kernel would confer, probably ...


1

I am not too sure, but you may want to create your executable by statically linking all the libraries.


1

You're going to find the greatest of success with Debian or Gentoo. Debian, while primarily a binary release, has packages available that turns your system into more of a developer-based system. Gentoo compiles everything by default, so all the developer tools will already be in-place. If you go with Debian, consider running Sid, their ...


1

Another possible solution is using statifier (http://statifier.sf.net) or Ermine (http://magicErmine.com) Both of them are able pack dynamic executable and all of it's needed libraries into one self-containing executable


1

There are two routes to getting fixes into Linux distributions. If the issue is distribution specific then the best place to start is the bug tracker for that distribution. You mentioned missing files, which is likely to be a distribution issue. (It's not quite clear from what you wrote why those files would be missing everywhere, are you sure they're not ...


1

basicly you can make every linux distro do that. i'm not an expert on this, but you need to hook into the runlevel and prevent the desktop from strating up completly. you only need a bare x server without any window manager and then lunch your app in fullscreen mode. as small but complete linux you could user dsm (damn small linux). it's fully featured with ...


1

The short answer is add this to your kernel command line: init=/path/to/my/application Typically the first process a Linux kernel will start is the init process. init takes care of running the startup scripts for everything else that needs to start at boot-time - e.g. kernel modules, daemons, console login/x desktop. You can tell the kernel to use any ...


1

I was running into the same issue. It is working fine after using the following command to create ISO. mkisofs -r -N -L -d -J -T -joliet-long -b isolinux/isolinux.bin -c isolinux/boot.cat -no-emul-boot -V RHEL6.5 -boot-load-size 4 -boot-info-table -o RHEL6.5-20131111.0-Server-x86_64-DVD1_new3.iso RHEL6.5-20131111.0-Server-x86_64-DVD1_new


1

use GNUInstallDirs, it will do everything for you.



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