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If you were designing a bespoke ASIC for one specific system you could indeed do precisely that - only implement exactly what you need. However, most processors/SoCs are produced as commodity products, so more flexibility allows them to be integrated in a wider variety of systems (and thus sell more). Given modern silicon processes, chip size tends to be ...


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You can set the kernel log buffer to log_buf_len=4M in your /boot/grub/grub.conf. This should increase the log buffer size to 4 MiB. Note you can also edit the grub during boot, and append the log_buf_len=4M at the end of the line starting with the kernel .... CONFIG_LOG_BUF_SHIFT shows the default size of the kernel log buffer not the maximum size, you can ...


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In contrast, a kthread does not have its own address space. Is that correct? Yes a thread created by pthread_create() shares the address space with the normal process. kernel: how to find all threads from a process's task_struct pthreads: pthread_create() are used in the user space, where multiple threads within your application share the same ...


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What is the advantage of using GPIO as IRQ? If I get your question, you are asking why even bother having a GPIO? The other answers show that someone may not even want the IRQ feature of an interrupt. Typical GPIO controllers can configure an I/O as either an input or an output. Many GPIO pads have the flexibility to be open drain. With an open ...


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The kernel part of the page table is required for each process to be able to access kernel memory (eg. to handle an interrupt or system call). Whether the kernel is actually required to update the page mappings for all processes individually depends on how the page mapping is done. For x86-based systems in protected mode, the page mapping is done using a ...


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The architectural operation of the SVC instruction is to save the CPSR into SPSR_SVC, save the address of the following instruction to LR_SVC, switch the CPU into SVC mode, set the PC to the SVC exception vector (0x08) and continue exectuting from there. That's just what the hardware does for that instruction (as a single atomic operation) - there is no ...


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I have limited experience with ftrace, although I have used it for for function stack traces and latency issues. (People with more experience can possibly suggest) Its pretty much the same experience using trace-cmd and kernelshark. However, if you want to trace syscalls, function params, kernel APIs and return values etc. within the kernel space a better ...


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Give "STRACE" a shot. It monitors the interaction betn userspace and kernel. A sample output can be found here : http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2011/11/strace-examples/ Alternatively, Since you are saying specific system calls, i am assuming you are interested in only a couple of them. If you have to use FTRACE alone, you can add your own trace event in ...


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Quoting Solomon Hykes Hi all, I'm a maintainer of Docker. As others already indicated this doesn't work on 1.0. But it could have. Please remember that at this time, we don't claim Docker out-of-the-box is suitable for containing untrusted programs with root privileges. So if you're thinking "pfew, good thing we upgraded to 1.0 or we were toast", ...


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Regarding the first solution you mentioned, by adding parameter isolcpus = [CPU no.] during boot will instruct Linux scheduler to not run any task on that CPU unless requested by user using CPU Affinity. But this CPU may receive interrupts and that can also be avoided by setting IRQ Affinity, so that the isolated CPU doesn’t receive any interrupt. Finally in ...


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"none" (aka "noop") is the correct scheduler to use for this device. I/O schedulers are primarily useful for slower storage devices with limited queueing (e.g, single mechanical hard drives) — the purpose of an I/O scheduler is to reorder I/O requests to get more important ones serviced earlier. For a device with a very large internal queue, and very fast ...


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It is not about "converting" anything - on a typical processor or microcontroller, a number of peripherals are connected to an interrupt controller; GPIO is just one of those peripherals. It is also by no means universally true; different devices have different capabilities, but in any case you are simply configuring a GPIO pin to generate an interrupt - ...



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