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0

I've came with plugin like this: import sublime, sublime_plugin import re class MyListener(sublime_plugin.EventListener): def __init__(self): sublime_plugin.EventListener.__init__(self) self.deleted = '' self.mark_for_clear = '' self.clipboard_save = '' self.empty_matcher = re.compile('^\s+$') # Clear last deleted word if user ...


0

solution is: watch -n 1 "mysqladmin -u root -pXXXXX processlist | grep tablename" | tee -a /root/plist.log


0

The % character has special meaning in crontab commands, you need to escape them. So you need to do: * * * * * [ $(mysql -uroot -e "show full processlist" | tee plist-`date +\%F-\%H-\%M`.log | wc -l) -lt 51 ] && rm plist-`date +\%F-\%H-\%M`.log If you want to use your original command, but not overwrite the file each time, you can use the -a ...


0

I had pretty much the same problem, and I have fixed it by changing the auto-mount settings for my flash drive and that line of code looks something like this: /dev/sda1 /home/pi/Server fat user,uid=pi,gid=pi,conv=b,dev,defaults,suid,umask=0000 0 0 I'm not shure about that fat because I can't access my Raspberry at the moment, but I guess ...


2

Since the shell expands the wildcard, you don't need to call glob. Just print all the arguments in sys.argv def list_file(): return sys.argv[1:] print list_file()


1

Use quotes. Shell runs first parameter as command. You can see this using "print sys.argv[1]" python fileName.py "/home/*"


4

The way you are calling the script, the * gets expanded by Bash itself, so by saying python fileName.py /home/* this gets expanded into python fileName.py /home/file1 /home/file2 /home/file3 so sys.argv[1] is just /home/file1. To make it work, add the * in the Python script: import sys import glob def list_file(): return glob.glob(sys.argv[1] + ...


1

You are setting the address size argument to size of Internet address sockaddr_in, which is too small for Unix path.


0

I got the solution for this as: /bin/bash -c "sudo ssh -A -t server1 ssh -A -t server2 ssh -A -t server3"


3

I assume each process/thread, as long as it is CPU bound, is given a time window. Once the window is over, it's swapped out and another process/thread is ran. Is that assumption correct? Are there any ball park numbers how long that window is on a modern PC? I'm assuming around 100 ms? What's the overhead of swapping out like? A few milliseconds or so? ...


2

Use cd .. You need a space between the cd and the .. Let me know if that helps!


0

This one finally solved my problem: Read binary data from std::cin Just add the following lines to your code if you are using MinGW: #include <io.h> #include <fcntl.h> #include <fstream> _setmode(_fileno(stdin), _O_BINARY);


1

The easiest approach, which you also seem to have found as per your most recent commit is to just have R 'glue' all object code into a single shared library. That tends to "just work" but it is a little costly as the library needs to be rebuilt. We could look into packaging CAF as an external library which would make RcppCAF more lightweight.


0

There is a tool called EXE Import Viewer it doesn't continuously list the function calls but it does reveal the dependencies of the the exe. From the site: EXE Import Viewer shows the information about linked libraries and functions, the list of function that an executable file imports, and the DLL's from which the program imports these functions. ...


0

You don't need to use dynamic memory. Your data segment or section is read-only because is not an standard section and you are not defining it's attributes and by default nasm assign them as read only data sections. Using objdump -h with you code outputs the following: 0 data 00000022 0000000000000000 0000000000000000 00000200 2**0 ...


0

Port 4096 does not look right, it should be Port 22 or omitted altogether as that's the default anyway. Also the generic username to connect to GitHub via SSH is git, like in User git. Do not use you GitHub username here.


0

It's likely a firewall or a network binding problem. The request is never making it to the play server. Can you test curl -i http://localhost:9000/ from the server and see if you get a 200 response? Sometimes you might need to use 127.0.0.1 or the hostname itself. Then you'll know that the problem isn't the play server. If that is the problem, see [ Force ...


0

Kubernetes plus Docker is probably good enough. Good instruction to install kubernetes is https://access.redhat.com/articles/1353773, or from kubernetes docs. After you have it installed, and authorization done, check it with > kubectl get nodes > kubectl get services We ran computational pods directly using JSON files from Docker images, along the ...


-1

We used to configure the user ~/.bash_profile or ~/.bashrc with some script when we don´t want to show their the bash. So U could do the same, create a script with this commands: ssh user@server1 ssh server2 ssh mainserver1 Then when U connect with this user it´ll redirect U to desired server. EDITTED The comment clearly the problem. The script can´t ...


0

You can use MTPuTTY (Multi-Tabbed PuTTY) This is a great tool when you have multiple sessions open and it allows you to call commands when you log into a profile. For example you can call cd /var/www every time you start an SSH session. (Right-click the Putty profile and select the Script tab)


0

Celery --purge option fixes this!


0

const T *p and T const *p declare p as a pointer to const T. T * const p declares p as a const pointer to T. const T * const p and T const * const p both declare p as a const pointer to const T.


4

Actually, __user is a macro providing some attributes (more on this here). So, the variable is named __argv, which is of type pointer to const pointer to const char.


2

You can use warpper.sh like this: #!/bin/bash # execute script1.sh in background and save pid in $pid1 ./script1.sh & pid1=$! # execute script2.sh in background and save pid in $pid2 ./script2.sh & pid2=$! # do more work here... # wait for both background jobs to finish and save their return status wait $pid1 && wait $pid2 && ...


4

As was mentioned, this may be a case of the XY problem. However, the solution is to use a pthread_mutex_t in each thread. The function creating the thread would create the pthread_mutext_t and pass it to the thread. pthread_t tid; pthread_mutext_t mutex; pthread_mutex_init(&mutex, NULL); pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex); pthread_create(&tid, NULL, ...


0

If you want formatted text, chain your commands with echo and use $0 to print the last field. Example: for i in {8..11}; do s1="$i" s2="str$i" s3="str with spaces $i" echo -n "$s1 $s2" | awk '{printf "|%3d|%6s",$1,$2}' echo -en "$s3" | awk '{printf "|%-19s|\n", $0}' done Prints: | 8| str8|str with spaces 8 | | 9| str9|str with spaces ...


0

Busybox also provides "top", which can display the CPU usage of processes. This doesn't directly answer your question since it's not using C, but maybe it will solve your problem without the extra hassle since you were already willing to use ps.


0

Be sure memcached is running: /etc/init.d/memcached status If not, start it with: /etc/init.d/memcached start


3

Since I can't mark the question as a duplicate of this, since "The duplicate question must exist on Stack Overflow" and because I want to share my experience, I will answer my own question. tmux and screen are the best answers in the duplicate. However, the first was not recognized in my Debian (probably need installing), while the later is ready to go and ...


0

As the commenters have said, saving a thread stack to restore it later is going to be really hard. If what you need is to prevent the thread to be called, you can try and "pause" it with a lock. See an example here.


0

If you want to measure CPU time and if you're on a (mostly) POSIX-supporting platform (maybe Android?), then you should look at clock_gettime() and getrusage() . You can find something to start here.


2

So CLOCK_MONOTONIC is the elapsed time since some undefined point of time in the past (for linux I believe this is boot time). CLOCK_REALTIME, however, is essentially the computer's interpretation of the current real-world time. As a result, this time changes according to your computers internal clock; if you manually change your machine's time, ...


0

You may need to clear the plugin column for your root account. On my fresh install, all of the root user accounts had unix_socket set in the plugin column. This was causing the root sql account to be locked only to the root unix account, since only system root could login via socket. If you update user set plugin='' where User='root';flush privileges;, you ...


2

Congratulations you've hit a bug in the 3.1 series of bash. From the Bash ChangeLog in the section relating to the bash-3.2-alpha release: This document details the changes between this version, bash-3.2-alpha, and the previous version, bash-3.1-release. ... f. Fixed two bugs with local array variable creation when shadowing a variable ...


1

who -b | awk '{$1=""; $2=""; print $0}' | date -f - Or if you only want the year: who -b | awk '{$1=""; $2=""; print $0}' | date -f - +%Y


0

Busybox is a small footprint set of tools which only contains the most useful subset of the functionality you will find in a desktop system. For a more complete ps you might want to use the ps from http://procps.sourceforge.net/ You might want to replace the ps in busybox, or you could take snippets of C source from procps if your program has a GPL ...


1

If you create a separate user just to handle the chown, you can give that user the CAP_CHOWN capability, and you can have a single executable owned by that user that has the setuid bit set on it (so it executes as that user). For security, this executable should do as little as possible, with as many checks as possible. It should do the chown for the ...


0

When you run sudo apt-get update All that you're doing is updating your sources list. Your sources list is where your machine looks for upgrades. To actually query those sources for upgrades, after you run the above command, run: sudo apt-get upgrade This will actually download and install the updated packages.


0

echo FQDN | rev | cut -d "." -f1 | rev Or, even with IP Address: getent hosts IP | rev | cut -d "." -f1 | rev


0

Ok I found the problem and fix it, thanks to the @Zac comment. Actually the python script try to open a network connection before writing the file: at boot time, when the python script is run from /etc/rc.local (so, it is run), the network is still not ready (probably because it is a wireless network) and therefore an exception is raised and the entire ...


1

#include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> #include <unistd.h> #define NEW_NAME "hello_world" int main(int argc, char **argv) { if(strcmp(argv[0], NEW_NAME)) { argv[0] = NEW_NAME; execv("/proc/self/exe", argv); fputs("exec failed", stderr); return 1; } while(1) // so it goes to the top ; }


0

So, you want the lines which do not begin with F| to be joined to the line before (which does). A solution with sed: sed -n '/^F|/{x;2,$p;be};x;G;s/\n//;h;:e;${g;p}' File.txt /^F|/ If line begins with F|: x Exchange the contents of the hold and pattern spaces 2,$p If not the first line: print the (previously held) line be Branch to label e Otherwise ...


1

You have two options: Have 1.sh output the value of $answer: echo "$answer", and capture that in a variable, then pass that as an argument to 2.sh and 3.sh: answer=$(1.sh) 2.sh "$answer" 3.sh "$answer" Instead of executing the scripts, source them so that they are executed by the current shell, not in a new process. Then any parameters set in 1.sh will ...


5

Just run your program by shell script or your program through exec and pass desired name as argv[0]: #/bin/bash exec -a fancy_name a.out ... or C/C++: execl( "./a.out", "fancy_name", ... );


0

As the error says, your script generates too many requests, therefore you've to slow it down. One option is to wait the specified number of seconds between the retrievals by using -w sec or --wait=seconds or use the --random-wait parameter and see if that helps.


0

To get started with Kubernetes, try: kubernetes.io, the Getting Started link is pretty good. They show many differnt ways to do it. Starting with installed linux you have two different examples, one that shows a manual installation (which might be what you are looking for), and one has Ansible based installation. The easiest way to get started is to use ...


0

The exit status of the source command appears to reflect whether it was able to read the file or not, rather than the success of the queries within it. barmar@dev:~$ mysql -e 'source /nonexistent/file' ERROR at line 1: Failed to open file '/nonexistent/file', error: 2 barmar@dev:~$ echo $? 1


1

setcontext is not valid when setting the context of a thread which has exited. (The stack pointer points into a stack which has been freed.) So that's why you're getting a crash. More in general, getcontext and setcontext are obsolete and extremely strange functions that should not be used unless you have very specific needs regarding cooperative ...


0

In the end I did not find a solution to running the easy install from reddit. Instead I used vagrant to create a virtual Ubuntu Linux 12.04 (Precise Pangolin) which with a little fiddling worked fine for me. The one issue is that you have to preallocate space for it (unlike if it were local (clearly)). I had to increase the size 4x to get it working for ...


0

In this usage, there is no difference. Both are a shorthand for tar -x -v -f httpd-2.2.31.tar Single character switches can be grouped together eg -xvf and seemingly unique to tar, the first argument will be treated as switches regardless of whether there is a hyphen.



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