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131

The Lisp community is fragmented, but everything else is too. Why are there so many Linux distributions? Why are there so many BSD variants? OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD, ... even Mac OS X. Why are there so many scripting languages? Ruby, Python, Rebol, TCL, PHP, and countless others. Why are there so many Unix shells? sh, csh, bash, ksh, ...? Why are there so ...


123

The short answer: macros are used for defining language syntax extension to Common Lisp or Domain Specific Languages (DSLs). These languages are embedded right within your existing Lisp code. Now, the DSLs can have syntax similar to Lisp (like Peter Norvig's Prolog Interpreter for Common Lisp) or completely different (e.g. Infix Notation Math for ...


121

Thank God that the software-engineering people have not yet discovered functional programming. Here are some parallels: Many OO "design patterns" are captured as higher-order functions. For example, the Visitor pattern is known in the functional world as a "fold" (or if you are a pointy-headed theorist, a "catamorphism"). In functional languages, data ...


111

There's no LLVM-targeted Lisp or Scheme because you haven't written one yet. Yes. You. The person reading this answer. It's your fault.


106

There are several reasons why one should not use EVAL. The main reason for beginners is: you don't need it. Example (assuming Common Lisp): EVAL an expression with different operators: (let ((ops '(+ *))) (dolist (op ops) (print (eval (list op 1 2 3))))) That's better written as: (let ((ops '(+ *))) (dolist (op ops) (print (funcall op 1 2 ...


100

you may want boundp: returns t if variable (a symbol) is not void; more precisely, if its current binding is not void. It returns nil otherwise. (boundp 'abracadabra) ; Starts out void. => nil (let ((abracadabra 5)) ; Locally bind it. (boundp 'abracadabra)) => t (boundp 'abracadabra) ; Still globally void. ...


93

Short answer Bypass the default evaluation rules and do not evaluate the expression (symbol or s-exp), passing it along to the function exactly as typed. Long Answer: The Default Evaluation Rule When a regular (I'll come to that later) function is invoked, all arguments passed to it are evaluated. This means you can write this: (* (+ a 2) 3) Which in ...


93

I will humbly suggest Seesaw. Here's a REPL-based tutorial that assumes no Java or Swing knowledge. Seesaw's a lot like what @tomjen suggests. Here's "Hello, World": (use 'seesaw.core) (-> (frame :title "Hello" :content "Hello, Seesaw" :on-close :exit) pack! show!) and here's @Abhijith and @dsm's example, translated pretty ...


89

Kawa, ABCL, and SISC are reimplementations of existing languages that are quite long in the tooth. They are excellent if for some reason you want to use standard Scheme or standard Common Lisp on the JVM. Clojure is a new language. It doesn't fill a gap. It adds entirely new possibilities. It favors a purely functional approach- Scheme and CL are both ...


87

Lisp is a large and complex language with a large and complex runtime to support it. For that reason, Lisp is best suited to large and complicated problems. Now, a complex problem isn't the same as a complicated one. A complex problem is one with a lot of small details, but which isn't hard. Writing an airline booking system is a complex business, but ...


84

You have several answers here, but none is really comprehensive (and I'm not talking about having enough details or being long enough). First of all, the bottom line: you should not use Common Lisp if you want to have a good experience with SICP. If you don't know much Common Lisp, then just take it as that. (Obviously you can disregard this advice as ...


83

To update this answer for Clojure 1.2 there is now full keyword arg support with defaults provided by the map forms of destructing binding: user> (defn foo [bar &{ :keys [baz quux] :or {baz "baz_default" quux "quux_default"}}] (list bar baz quux)) #'user/foo user> (foo 1 :quux 3) (1 "baz_default" 3)


80

Lisp WAS used in AI until the end of the 1980s. In the 80s, though, Common Lisp was oversold to the business world as the "AI language"; the backlash forced most AI programmers to C++ for a few years. These days, prototypes usually are written in a younger dynamic language (Perl, Python, Ruby, etc) and implementations of successful research is usually in C ...


79

Try reading Practical Common Lisp, by Peter Seibel.


77

Matt's explanation is perfectly fine -- and he takes a shot at a comparison to C and Java, which I won't do -- but for some reason I really enjoy discussing this very topic once in a while, so -- here's my shot at an answer. On points (3) and (4): Points (3) and (4) on your list seem the most interesting and still relevant now. To understand them, it is ...


74

Lisp users refer to Lisp as the programmable programming language. It is used for symbolic computing - computing with symbols. Macros are only one way to exploit the symbolic computing paradigm. The broader vision is that Lisp provides easy ways to describe symbolic expressions: mathematical terms, logic expressions, iteration statements, rules, constraint ...


73

I like macros. Here's code to stuff away attributes for people from LDAP. I just happened to have that code lying around and fiigured it'd be useful for others. Some people are confused over a supposed runtime penalty of macros, so I've added an attempt at clarifying things at the end. In The Beginning, There Was Duplication (defun ldap-users () (let ...


71

Here's the Clojure documentation for Keywords and Symbols. Keywords are symbolic identifiers that evaluate to themselves. They provide very fast equality tests... Symbols are identifiers that are normally used to refer to something else. They can be used in program forms to refer to function parameters, let bindings, class names and global vars... ...


70

A lambda (or closure) encapsulates both the function pointer and variables. This is why, in C#, you can do: int lessThan = 100; Func<int, bool> lessThanTest = delegate(int i) { return i < lessThan; }; I used an anonymous delegate there as a closure (it's syntax is a little clearer and closer to C than the lambda equivalent), which captured ...


69

You will find a comprehensive debate around lisp macro here. An interesting subset of that article: In most programming languages, syntax is complex. Macros have to take apart program syntax, analyze it, and reassemble it. They do not have access to the program's parser, so they have to depend on heuristics and best-guesses. Sometimes their cut-rate ...


66

I've read up on Lisp a little and I would love to find a language that allows some of the cool stuff that Lisp does, but without the strange syntax, etc. of Lisp. Wouldn't we all. minimal distinction between code and data, Lisp style Sadly, the minimal distinction between code and data and "strange" syntax are consequences of each other. If you ...


66

Franz, Inc. provides an inexhaustive list of success stories on their website. However: Please don't assume Lisp is only useful for Animation and Graphics, AI, Bioinformatics, B2B and E-Commerce, Data Mining, EDA/Semiconductor applications, Expert Systems, Finance, Intelligent Agents, Knowledge Management, Mechanical CAD, Modeling and ...


66

Short answer: almost anything you can do with macros you can do with a higher-order function (and I include monads, arrows, etc.), but it might require more thinking (but only the first time, and it's fun and you'll be a better programmer for it), and the static system is sufficiently general that it never gets in your way, and somewhat surprisingly it ...


65

Racket is ultimately based on R5RS, and not R6RS and not a strict superset of either. I don't think it can be called 'Scheme' because it's not backwards compatible with any Scheme standard. Most implementations offer extensions, but are otherwise backwards compatible, of course, the compiler that comes with Racket can also run in R5RS or R6RS mode. Valid ...


61

Coming at this from the perspective of a database person, I find that front end developers try too hard to find ways to make databases fit their model rather than consider the most effective ways to use database which are not object oriented or functional but relational and using set-theory. I have seen this generally result in poorly performing code. And ...


60

My personal favorite is Abelson & Sussman Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs. It uses Scheme, which is a nice and clean dialect of Lisp. If you like a more practical approach maybe you should pick some Lisp framework for web design (I have no idea if such a beast exists) and jump right in.


60

Yes, web development is one of Common Lisp's strengths today. As a web server, use Hunchentoot, formerly known as tbnl, by Dr. Edmund Weitz. You can run it as a back-end to Apache using mod_proxy as a reverse proxy, or as a stand-alone server. Various HTML generation solutions are available, from PHP-style templates to Lisp macro hacks to XSLT. Just take ...


58

First of all, don't worry about losing particular features like dynamic typing. As you're familiar with Common Lisp, a remarkably well-designed language, I assume you're aware that a language can't be reduced to its feature set. It's all about a coherent whole, isn't it? In this regard, Haskell shines just as brightly as Common Lisp does. Its features ...


57

Since addition is commutative, something like this should work: (defn sum [& args] (reduce + args)) In general, non-commutative case you can use apply: (defn sum [& args] (apply + args)) & causes args to be bound to the remainder of the argument list (in this case the whole list, as there's nothing to the left of &). Obviously ...


56

I'd go with PLT. It may not be as fast as SBCL, but it does have excellent libraries and documentation, as well as an integrated environment that's designed to get you developing and running Scheme programs right out of the gate. What I really like about PLT's DrScheme is what you don't have to do - you don't have to learn Emacs, you don't have to learn ...



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