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3

This problem can be solved using the tortoise and hare algorithm where you have two cursors scanning though tortoise at one cons at a time and hare at double speed starting on the second element. If the tortoise and hare is the same element you have a cycle. (defun cyclicp (list) "check if a list is cyclic using tortoise and hare algorithm" (loop :for ...


1

You are throwing away the second value at each step. You are just comparing the list with its car everytime, so you can only catch one special case of circularity, where the list directly references itself. What you need to do is try all circle lengths. The usual way for this is to have two references that move at different speeds through the list. You ...


0

You probably mean Common Lisp: (defun subset (f l) (cond ((null l) ()) ((funcall f (car l)) (cons (car l) (subset f (cdr l)))) (t (subset f (cdr l))))) (subset #'oddp '(1 2 3 4 5 6 7)) ; ==> (1 3 5 7) You code was not correct Scheme since () needs to be quoted: #!r6rs (import (rnrs base)) (define (subset f l) (cond ((null? l) ...


1

Since you have Realm of Racket, I would stick with Racket. The question is not one that can be answered in fair, objetive way - so you will most likely find that your question will be closed.


0

I just started using Clojure so I don't know if it's good but here is my solution: (defn divides? [x i] (zero? (mod x i))) (defn factors [x] (flatten (map #(list % (/ x %)) (filter #(divides? x %) (range 1 (inc (Math/floor (Math/sqrt x)))))))) (defn prime? [x] (empty? (filter #(and divides? (not= x %) (not= 1 %)) (factors x)))) (def primes ...


0

The function keyword appears to have had different meanings in different Lisp languages. In LISP 1.5, it was used to create a closure, using the funarg device. Reference: http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?DynamicClosure, and the LISP 1.5 Programmers Manual, Appendix B. In MacLisp, it was used as a hint to the compiler to say that the lambda expression could be ...


0

render-object is a generic function that takes a rendering object, which is either the object passed to :render-method for define-route or the value of *default-render-method*, and the object to render. It then renders that object (usually as text, although you could probably render it to an octet array as well). The example assumes that you have a class ...


1

In Common Lisp you can print a value using, well, the print procedure: (defvar L '((A B) (C))) (print (car L)) ; same as (print (car '((A B) (C)))) => '(A B) (print (cdr L)) ; same as (print (cdr '((A B) (C)))) => '((C))


0

Here's a Scheme interpreter that runs in your browser: http://repl.it/languages/Scheme


6

Okay,I'm going to be "that guy"; there's a good reason for using the "extremely ugly" solution of putting the rest of the function inside of the "else" of your conditional; it makes the code easier to read and understand. When I'm trying to understand what a function does, I don't want to have to scan through all the code hunting for hidden returns and ...


1

If you're asking for a book that will give you a deep understanding of Lisp without touching macros, I'd recommend the classic SICP. The first three chapters are basically programming warm-up (though still very much worth reading). Chapter 4 shows you how to construct a Scheme interpreter, and Chapter 5 explains how to run this interpreter on a fairly ...


0

You'll need to define with c: Please try the following: (defun c:BIGUNDO()(command "undo" "b" "Y")) Note the "Y" at the end because it asks This will undo everything. OK?


5

A simple way in Racket: (define (foo x) (let/ec return (when (= x 0) (return 'zero)) 'not-zero)) Here ec stands for escape continuations, which are cheaper than full continuations.


1

You tagged this as both Common Lisp and Racket, which are two completely different languages. If you're using Racket or Scheme and want to return from a function early, you can do it using a continuation: (define (my-function x y) (call-with-current-continuation (lambda (return) (when x (return y)) ;; Rest of code not evaluated if X is ...


1

I'll speak only about Scheme, since that's the language I know best, but many of the concepts apply to other Lisps too. No, you won't find such a book. Only the most low-level "kernel" of a Scheme implementation, including the basic syntax object system that's the basis of a macro expander, can avoid any macros. Even basic things like let and cond are ...


1

On mine I had to do this to get it working on Windows: (setq slime-lisp-implementations '((sbcl ("C:\\Program Files\\Steel Bank Common Lisp\\1.2.8\\sbcl.exe" "--core" "C:\\Program Files\\Steel Bank Common Lisp\\1.2.8\\sbcl.core"))))


0

I've implemented such a feature for the OpenDCL grid system. You have to activate the OnCancelClose function on your form. This is how I did it: (defun c:MyFunction_Form1_OnCancelClose (Reason /) ;; Reason = 0 when Enter is pressed (if (= Reason 0) (progn ;; Shift active editing cell one row down (setq ...


5

In terms of what they do, car and cdr are equivalent to first and rest. This is quite clear in the documentation. The HyperSpec says on the entry for first, second, &c: The functions first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, and tenth access the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, and ...


1

The operations first and rest signals that you are working with a list: a series of pairs ending with the empty list i.e. it is of the form (list x1 ... xn) The operations car and cdr signals that you are working on a data structure build with pairs, that potentially isn't a list. That is choose first and rest when you work with lists, to make the code ...


1

Firstly, none of these is a predicate (or at least, they aren't what Lisp programmers call "predicates"; in this context, "predicate" means "a function that returns a boolean value"). As to the question, lets hop into a REPL for a minute. ; SLIME 2014-12-23 CL-USER> (describe #'car) #<FUNCTION CAR> [compiled function] Lambda-list: (LIST) ...


0

You're looking for an environment to play around with Lisp in? Just on the chance it may broaden your horizon, you might want to start using the editor GNU Emacs which is extendable and programmable - in Lisp! (It's the dialect elisp which resembles the old school dialect Maclisp.) GNU Emacs: https://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/


1

Classically, car and cdr have been more machine oriented while first and rest have been more abstract functions. In reality, there is no difference between them. Everyone stuck to car and cdr, so car and cdr prevailed. If you're having a hard time to finding any differences between car and first, it's because there is none. Look at first as an alias for ...


2

You can download DrRacket here: http://download.racket-lang.org/ DrRacket allows you to edit and run programs easily.


2

I see you have tagged functional programming, but the solution you are trying to do is far from functional. A functional approach would be to have a case analysis. The base case would be a empty list. The answer would be 0. The default case would be the length of the rest of the list plus one. eg. (my-length '(1)) ==> (1+ (my-length '()) ==> (1+ 0) ...


4

An additional comparison for each iteration and one additional iteration gives you this: CL-USER 2 > (defun foo (n e &aux (z (1+ n))) (loop for i to z unless (= i z) collect i else nconc e)) FOO CL-USER 3 > (foo 4 '(f o o)) (0 1 2 3 4 F O O)


2

Question: Is there a way to use this "pointer" in the finally clause? It would allow one to append something to the result, which is sometimes useful. I think the answer is "no". The syntax for the finally clause is given in: initial-final::= initially compound-form+ | finally compound-form+ You can, of course, collect into some particular ...


3

Quoted data is considered a constant. If you have two functions: (defun test (&optional (arg '(0))) (setf (car arg) (1+ (car arg))) (car arg)) (defun test2 () '(0)) These are two functions both using the constant list (0) right? The implementation may choose to not mutate constants: (test) ; ==> Error, into the debugger we go The ...


4

When evaluated, '(nil) and (list nil) produce similar lists, but the former can be considered constant when present in source code. You should not perform any destructive operations on a constant quoted list in Common Lisp. See http://l1sp.org/cl/3.2.2.3 and http://l1sp.org/cl/quote. In particular, the latter says "The consequences are undefined if literal ...


1

The symbol "@FAKE-SERVER" is not external in the RESTAS package You could still access this symbol using the double colon notation, i.e. #'restas::@fake-server. However, since you are not the author of the restas package, you might want to define the @fake-server-function in a package of your own. I can't help you with your followup problem, since as far ...


0

There are two main reasons you would want to use fexprs. The first one is because they allow you to evaluate the arguments an arbitrary number of times. This makes it possible to implement operators that evaluate their arguments lazily like you suggested. Constructs built this way are also capable of evaluating their arguments more than once. This makes it ...


8

The reader expands 'symbol to (quote symbol). So in your case '('arg1 'arg2) is equivalent to (quote ((quote arg1) (quote arg2))) which evaluates to this list: ((quote arg1) (quote arg2)) Evaluating your form starting with the backquote results in splicing the list elements ((quote arg1) and (quote arg2)) at the same position in the resulting list ...


8

I've had the same problem a few years ago. I found nothing in ANSI CL which would support an order or filtering. But there is also no issue which discusses a change. The example you mentioned assumes CLtL2 interpretation. Thus it makes sense to assume that a compiler may reorder the types and that this has changed from CLtL2.


1

This looks like old pre-ASDF2 advice. 1- for portability to CLISP, use (require "asdf"), not (require 'asdf). 2- no need to conditionalize your defpackage. 3- no need to defpackage and in-package in your .asd file. 4- call your file package.lisp, cc3.lisp, test.lisp, and your components "package", "cc3", "test". 5- move test to its own (defsystem ...


7

It stands for Aesthetic. A-formatted output is not escaped. See http://www.lispworks.com/documentation/HyperSpec/Body/22_cda.htm Incidentally, S stands for Standard rather than S-expression.


3

You can also use the more modern write. I'm not a huge fan of format because of its terse sub language, which usually is interpreted. Note that a good implementation might be able to compile format directives to more efficient code. I use FORMAT mostly when it makes complex code shorter, but not to output plain objects or things like single carriage ...


3

These functions correspond exactly to the following FORMAT operators: TERPRI = ~% PRIN1 = ~S PRINC = ~A PRINT = ~%~S<space>


2

TRACE works by redefining the function to something that prints the trace messages and then calls the original function. But you're not normally allowed to redefine built-in functions, so you get this error.


2

A cond consists of the cond symbol followed by a number of cond clauses, each of which is a list. The first element of a cond clause is the condition; the remaining elements (if any) are the action. The cond form finds the first clause whose condition evaluates to true (ie, doesn't evaluate to nil); it then executes the corresponding action and returns the ...


4

That's the symbol LISP uses for True. In a cond in LISPs, the "catch all" at the end uses t to indicate that if none of the preceding conditions evaluate to True, this code will always execute. Consider it here as the equivalent of an else in an if-else. On the whole, though, it just represents True.


0

The problem you're having is that you're trying to create 100*100*100*100*50 lists of 5 elements each, that's 5 billion lists with 25 billion elements in total. Long story short, it doesn't fit in the amount of memory assigned to lisp image. It's likely that it won't fit even if you assigned your whole memory to lisp.


1

A cons is a data structure that can contain two values. Eg (cons 1 2) ; ==> (1 . 2). The first part is car, the second is cdr. A cons is a list if it's cdr is either nil or a list. Thus (1 . (2 . (3 . ()))) is a list. When printing cons the dot is omitted when the cdr is a cons or nil. The outer parentheses of the cdr is also omitted. Thus (3 . ()) is ...


4

See this visualization: CL-USER 7 > (sdraw:sdraw '(A A B)) [*|*]--->[*|*]--->[*|*]--->NIL | | | v v v A A B CL-USER 8 > (sdraw:sdraw '((A B) . A)) [*|*]--->A | v [*|*]--->[*|*]--->NIL | | v v A B Also: CL-USER 9 > (sdraw:sdraw '(A B)) ...


0

> Why do people say lists come for free in Lisp? No idea. It seems you need a mental idea of how lists are stored in memory. This makes you able to compute how much space the lists will need. A cons cell consists of two slots. A list like (a b c) is stored as (cons 'a (cons 'b (cons 'c '()))). A simple model is to think of a cons cell as two pointers. ...


3

A list (a b c) is represented (stored internally) as three cons-cells: (cons 'a (cons 'b (cons 'c '()). Note that the last pair has '() in its cdr. Series of cons-cells whose last cdr is '() is printed as a list by the printer. The example is thus printed as (a b c). Let's look at: (cons 'a '(a b)). The list '(a b) is represented as (cons 'a (cons 'b ...


12

It's pretty easy to understand if you think of them as cons-cells. In short, a cons cell consists of exactly two values. The normal notation for this is to use the dot, e.g.: (cons 'a 'b) ==> (A . B) But since lists are used so often in LISP, a better notation is to drop the dot. Lists are made by having the second element be a new cons cell, with the ...


1

Dale is C (/a C-like language), but written with Lisp's syntax and several high-level compile-time features (macros, type inference, anonymous functions, modules... nothing that impacts runtime). PreScheme is the same destination reached by working from the opposite direction: it is a restricted dialect of Scheme that removes those runtime features that ...


0

I recommend you to use the REPL, to experiment with Lisp Code is the best way for learning, for your code, If you use SBCL I recommend you to develope using slime I reccomend you to try this on the REPL: ; first define the parameters that you will use inside the tread CL-USER> (defparameter a 3) A CL-USER> (defparameter b 4) B CL-USER> ...


3

sb-thread:make-thread takes a function to call in a newly created thread. (lambda () (progn (sleep 0) (setf c (+ a b)) (print "ADDITION") (print c))) is an anonymous function. In turn progn creates a program block (un-necessarily in this case, as a lambda body is an implicit progn) and (sleep 0) is probably used as a "please ...


8

I don't think you understand evaluation fully. We now look at Lisp code. That means source code of a programming language. Not s-expressions: '(t) Above is the same as: (quote (t)) If we evaluate it, Lisp sees the QUOTE special operator. QUOTE prevents evaluation of the enclosed form and returns it. Thus the result is (T). T never gets evaluated. (T) ...


5

Note that there is a slight difference between indenting and formatting. Indenting usually means to move contents of a line horizontally. Usually we know already what is on the line and the line before. If you ask a typical editor to indent, it will do nothing more than adjusting the horizontal position of the line content. It will not distribute ...



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