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40

From the documentation: List comprehensions provide a concise way to create lists. Common applications are to make new lists where each element is the result of some operations applied to each member of another sequence or iterable, or to create a subsequence of those elements that satisfy a certain condition. About your question, the list ...


29

You can use itertools.groupby: >>> import itertools >>> [key for key, grp in itertools.groupby([1, 2, 2, 3])] [1, 2, 3] itertools.groupby returns an iterator. By iterating it, you will get a key, group pairs. (key will be a item if no key function is specified, otherwise the return value of the key function). group is an iterator which ...


19

You can use itertools.product to hide the nested loops in your list comprehension. Use the repeat parameter to set the number of loops over the list (i.e. the number of elements in the tuple): >>> import itertools >>> lst = [-4, -2, 1, 2, 5, 0] >>> [x for x in itertools.product(lst, repeat=3) if sum(x) == 0] [(-4, 2, 2), (-2, 1, ...


18

Don't use nested loops; you are pairing up A and B, with B repeating as needed. What you need is zip() (to do the pairing), and itertools.cycle() (to repeat B): from itertools import cycle zip(A, cycle(B)) If B is always going to be half the size of A, you could also just double B: zip(A, B + B) Demo: >>> from itertools import cycle ...


17

To avoid quadratic runtime, you'd want to make an initial pass to figure out which elements appear in more than one set: import itertools import collections element_counts = collections.Counter(itertools.chain.from_iterable(allsets)) Then you can simply make a list of sets retaining all elements that only appear once: nondupes = [{elem for elem in ...


14

You could use the product() function from itertools as follows: from itertools import product answer = list(list(x) for x in product([0, 1], repeat=3)) print(answer) Output [[0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 1], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 1], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 1], [1, 1, 0], [1, 1, 1]]


14

You could use list comprehension and enumerate with solution suggested by @AChampion: xs = [1,2,2,2,1,1] In [115]: [n for i, n in enumerate(xs) if i==0 or n != xs[i-1]] Out[115]: [1, 2, 1] That list comprehension return item if it's first or for the following if it's not equal to previous. It'll work due to lazy evaluations of if statement.


10

In Haskell everything (well almost) is lazy and this is no difference But if you ask GHCi to print it (you did with the input) it will evaluate all of it To see it use this: Prelude> let xs = [x*2|x<-[1..10]] Prelude> :sprint xs xs = _ the _ indicates a unevaluated thunk here BTW: this is why Haskell has no issue with something like this: ...


9

[(A[x % len(A)], B[x % len(B)]) for x in range(max(len(A), len(B)))] This will work whether or not A is the larger list. :)


7

Complementary to the solutions using product, you could also use a triple list comprehension. >>> x, y, z = 1, 2, 3 >>> [(a, b, c) for a in range(x+1) for b in range(y+1) for c in range(z+1)] [(0, 0, 0), (0, 0, 1), (0, 0, 2), (some more), (1, 2, 2), (1, 2, 3)] The +1 is necessary since range does not include the upper bound. If you ...


7

Here's how I'd do it ascending :: Ord a => [a] -> Bool ascending list = and $ zipWith (>=) (tail list) list dim ps n = map product $ filter ascending allComb where allComb = replicateM n ps The replicateM comes from Control.Monad and for the list monad it generates all combinations of n elements of the given list. Then I filter out just the ...


7

Yes it can be done but is hardly pythonic >>> [(i-set.union(*[j for j in allsets if j!= i])) for i in allsets] [set([1, 2]), set([6]), set([7])] Some reference on sets can be found in the documentation. The * operator is called unpacking operator.


6

You can use range() function within a list comprehension and itertools.product function: >>> x = 1 >>> y = 1 >>> z = 1 >>> from itertools import product >>> list(product(*[range(i+1) for i in [x,y,z]])) [(0, 0, 0), (0, 0, 1), (0, 1, 0), (0, 1, 1), (1, 0, 0), (1, 0, 1), (1, 1, 0), (1, 1, 1)] This approach will ...


6

range is actually a half-closed function. So, the ending value will not be included in the resulting range. If X=2, the possible values of Xi can be 0, 1 and 2 In your code, range(X) will give only 0 and 1, if X is 2. You should have used range(X + 1). >>> X, Y, Z, N = 1, 1, 1, 2 >>> [[x,y,z] for x in range(X + 1) for y in range(Y + ...


6

Use the csv module and insert each row into a dictionary: import csv with open('input.txt') as tsvfile: reader = csv.reader(tsvfile, delimiter='\t') datamap = {row[0]: row[1:] for row in reader} This sidesteps the issue altogether. You can put a str.split() result into a tuple to create a 'loop variable': datamap = {row[0]: row[1:] for l in f ...


6

Try this: return [f for f in file_list if os.path.isfile(SC_JSON_DIR + f + ".json")]


5

You cannot access the list you currently creating, but if the order is not important you can use a set: coupons = set(coupon.code_used for source in sources for coupon in source)


5

Since you need to sort anyway, itertools.groupby can be used to do this pretty nicely: from operator import itemgetter from itertools import groupby shoesizes = [ 2 , 5 , 6 , 1 , 3 , 2 , 4 , 5 , 2 , 3 , 1 ] quantities = [ 50, 100, 120, 20, 40, 10, 90 , 10 ,30 , 20, 80] # For convenience, short names for itemgetters getsize, getcnt = ...


5

Using pairwise from the itertools recipes (with zip_longest) gives you an easy way of checking the next element: import itertools as it def pairwise(iterable): a, b = it.tee(iterable) next(b, None) return it.zip_longest(a, b, fillvalue=object()) # izip_longest for Py2 >>> xs = [1,2,2,3] >>> [x for x, y in pairwise(xs) if x ...


5

A slightly different solution using Counter and comprehensions, to take advantage of the - operator for set difference. from itertools import chain from collections import Counter allsets = [{1, 2, 4}, {4, 5, 6}, {4, 5, 7}] element_counts = Counter(chain.from_iterable(allsets)) dupes = {key for key in element_counts if element_counts[key] > ...


5

Use list comprehension, divisibleBySeven = [num for num in inputList if num != 0 and num % 7 == 0] or you can use the meetsCondition also, divisibleBySeven = [num for num in inputList if meetsCondition(num)] you can actually write the same condition with Python's truthy semantics, like this divisibleBySeven = [num for num in inputList if num and num % ...


5

Try this, def get_dic_from_two_lists(keys, values): return { keys[i] : values[i] for i in range(len(keys)) } Assume we have two lists country and capital country = ['India', 'Pakistan', 'China'] capital = ['New Delhi', 'Islamabad', 'Beijing'] print get_dic_from_two_lists(country, capital) The output is like this, {'Pakistan': ...


5

I think a two-level list comprehension is what you want: coordinates = [[data[index] for index in cluster] for cluster in clusters]


4

Your condition should have been like this [e for e in data if not (e.get('name') == 'paul' and e.get('city') == 'madrid')] Output [{u'city': u'paris', u'id': u'1', u'name': u'paul'}, {u'city': u'berlin', u'id': u'3', u'name': u'tom'}, {u'city': u'madrid', u'id': u'4', u'name': u'tom'}] This checks if the current element's name is paul and city is ...


4

Try changing the and to or. [elem for elem in listionary if (elem.get('name')!='paul' or elem.get('city')!='madrid')] Remember de morgan's laws. Informally: when you negate a boolean expression, you have to switch and with or in addition to switching "==" with "!=".


4

First, count how often each pair appears, using zip and a dictionary: listX = [1,7,7,4,5,7,7] listY = [2,4,4,3,1,4,6] pairs = {} for (x, y) in zip(listX, listY): pairs[(x,y)] = pairs.get((x,y), 0) + 1 Or, as suggested in comments, using collections.Counter: pairs = collections.Counter(zip(listX, listY)) Now, pairs will be {(1, 2): 1, (7, 4): 3, ...


4

A close translation could be: dim :: Num a => [a] -> Int -> [a] dim ps n = do chosen <- replicateM n ps guard $ increasing chosen return $ product chosen increasing :: Ord a => [a] -> Bool increasing [] = True increasing xs@(_:ys) = and $ zipWith (<=) xs ys However, this could be improved by putting the guards earlier. I ...


4

Perhaps the easiest to understand solution is to “literally use a loop”: dim ps n = do pz <- forM [1..n] $ \_i -> do p <- ps return p guard $ descending pz return $ product pz But do {p <- ps; return p} is equivalent to simply ps, and for forM [1..n] $ \_i -> ps we have the shorthand replicateM n ps. ...


4

Try using only one for loop instead of two and having the second wrap back to 0 once it gets past its length. [(A[x], B[x%len(B)]) for x in range(len(A))] Note that this will only work if A is the longer list. If you know B will always be half the size of A you can also use this: list(zip(A, B*2))


4

What you're trying to do is this: “isolate” each element in the list from the rest, then recurse over the rest. You attempt to achieve this seperation by, on one side, selecting each element with !!, and on the other removing it. But that's not quite what drop does, it's rather a task for deleteBy. That is awkward to use with indices, though: ...



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