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0

with this command : list_comprehension = [list comprehension] actually you create another pointer to that part of memory that array have been saved ! So the for loop is same in tow case ! see this Demo: >>> a=[1,2,4] >>> b=a >>> b [1, 2, 4] >>> a [1, 2, 4] >>> a.append(7) >>> a [1, 2, 4, 7] ...


1

When you do for x in [list comprehension]: the entire list is built before the for loop starts. Its basically equivalent to the second example except for the variable assignment.


1

a list comprehension returns a list. The only difference between your two examples is that you're binding the output list to a variable in the second. A generator expression returns an iterator, which means that: It won't get evaluated until you use it If you want to use it more than once you'll have to generate it each time.


5

So x goes from 1 to 2, and y from x to 3. So for the first one: x = 1 y = 1 z = 1 + 1 = 2 z is not odd, therefore, it is not added. Then: x = 1 y = 2 z = 1 + 2 = 3 z is now odd, so it is added. Then: x = 1 y = 3 z = 1 + 3 = 4 z is even, ergo not added. Then: x = 2 y = 2 z = 2 + 2 = 4 z is even. Then: x = 2 y = 3 z = 2 + 3 = 5 z is 5, odd, ...


2

You're generating tuples, where sum of their elements must be an odd number. The line: let z = x+y, odd z gives name z to the sum x + y, this value then is used with predicate odd to test if the sum is actually odd. Combinations of x and y, for which odd z evaluates to True get into the result list, others are removed. Note that the lowest value for y ...


7

My preferred solution uses a list comprehension f :: [t] -> [(t, t)] f list = [ (a,b) | theTail@(a:_) <- tails list , b <- theTail ] I find this to be quite readable: first you choose (non-deterministically) a suffix theTail, starting with a, and then you choose (non-deterministically) an element b of the suffix. Finally, the pair (a,b) is ...


7

ThreeFx's answer will work, but it adds the constraint that you elements must be orderable. Instead, you can get away with functions in Prelude and Data.List to implement this more efficiently and more generically: import Data.List (tails) permutations2 :: [a] -> [(a, a)] permutations2 list = concat $ zipWith (zip . repeat) list $ tails ...


2

Just use a list comprehension: f :: (Ord a) => [a] -> [(a, a)] f list = [ (a, b) | a <- list, b <- list, a <= b ] Since Haskell's String is in the Ord typeclass, which means it can be ordered, you first tell Haskell to get all possible combinations and then exclude every combination where b is greater than a which removes all "duplicate" ...


3

Use sum() with a generator expression, testing for your conditions: matching = {'car', 'mercedes', 'ferrari'} sum(int(value) for key, value in var if key in matching) The generator expression does much the same as your list comprehension does; loop over the list and do something with each element. I chose to use tuple assignment in the loop; the two ...


1

One implementation: acceptableInput = re.compile(r"\d{3}[A-Z]") paddedInput = i.upper().zfill(4) if acceptableInput.match(paddedInput): # do something else: # reject


1

For zero padding: i.zfill(4) Check invalid input: import re re.match("\d{1,3}[A-Z]", i) Put it together: [i.zfill(4) for i in x if re.match("\d{1,3}[A-Z]", i)] Compiling the re separately will make the code faster, so: x = ['0A', '05C', '001F', '10x'] import re matcher = re.compile("\d{1,3}[A-Z]") out = [i.zfill(4) for i in x if matcher.match(i)] ...


2

You can use a nested loop to compute the sub-set from lst first, or you can use the any() function to use a generator expression and limit the number of iterations: Using a nested list loop: [r for r in listOfList for indexed in ({lst[i] for i in r},) if 1 not in indexed and 0 in indexed] I also changed the sub-set from lst to a set to make use of ...


1

even_print(List)-> [io:format("Printing ~p ~n",[X])|| X <- List, even == even_odd(X)]. Now try: 217> seq_erlang:even_print([2,4,5]). Printing 2 Printing 4 [ok,ok]


2

That should be even == even_odd(X) instead of using <-. A list comprehension has two types of "clauses": those that map over a list with <-, and those that filter out undesired combinations using a guard or boolean expression that doesn't contain <-. (And a third one: extract bytes from a binary using <=; but that one is more rarely used.)


5

You are not testing correctly. In Python 3, map() returns an iterator, not a list. You are not actually iterating in your test, only testing the creation of the iterator. You'll need to include iteration to see which approach is faster; you could use collections.deque() with a length of 0, this will iterate without producing a new list object: import ...


0

You can use 0 as base for int conversion and python will try to deduce the base. This only accepts strings, so we can use str. The try-except returns None when a conversion is not possible: def func(iterable): try: return [int(str(x), 0) for x in iterable] except: return None Your test cases are not very correct, check these: ...


0

For example, this: [ x**2 if x%2==0 else x**3 if x%3==0 else 0 for x in range(10)] Is the equivalent of this: >>> l = [] >>> for x in range(10): ... l.append(x**2 if x%2==0 else x**3 if x%3==0 else 0) ... >>> l [0, 0, 4, 27, 16, 0, 36, 0, 64, 729] I.e. there is no if statement, but rather an if expression. So there's ...


3

You have two different concepts confused here. An expression like x**2 if x%2==0 else x**3 is a conditional expression. They can be chained, but the else is not optional - because this is a self-contained expression that evaluates to a single, specific value. The else x**3 is required because Python has to know what the expression evaluates to whenever it ...


0

from the docs: A list comprehension consists of brackets containing an expression followed by a for clause, then zero or more for or if clauses. The result will be a new list resulting from evaluating the expression in the context of the for and if clauses which follow it. so, by definition the if comes after the for.


0

You are confusing two completely different constructs. Conditions for list comprehensions can be defined only at one plance, at the end, and they act like filters: [ ... for ... if .... ] The other construct you see is python's version of the ternary operator. It's not a filter, it just selects one of the expressions based on the logical value of a third ...


4

raise is a statement, but inside another statement you can only use expressions. Also, why not use itertools.takewhile? full_list = list(itertools.takewhile(lambda x: x >= threshold, full_list))


0

You could use the built-in filter function. The syntax is: filter(function, sequence) So, your code would look like: filter(lambda x:x[0] == today, raw_json) P.S. I know you'd prefer to use list comprehensions, but I think a filter would make the code more readable here.


1

def getSummaryData(testLogFolder): summary = {'Total':0, 'Success':0, 'Error':0} (path, dirs, files) = os.walk(testLogFolder).next() for currentFile in files: fullNameFile = path + "\\" + currentFile if currentFile.endswith(".log"): with open(fullNameFile,"r") as fH: for pair in ...


0

You can just call np.round on your list of lists, no need for a comprehension import numpy as np a = ([[4.5555, 5.6666, 8.3365], [10.4345, 1.574355, 0.7216313]]) print np.round(a,2) [[ 4.56 5.67 8.34] [ 10.43 1.57 0.72]]


0

Your tags suggset that a is actually a Numpy array and not a nested Python list. In that case, you can use the round() method on the array object to get a rounded copy of the array: >>> a = numpy.random.randn(3, 3) >>> a array([[ 1.46998835, 0.62139675, 0.37665545], [-0.79925019, -0.51251798, 1.36500036], [ 0.66339687, ...


1

You need to nest your list comprehensions: [[np.round(float(i), 2) for i in nested] for nested in outerlist] The outer list comprehension loops over your outer list object, then applies an inner list comprehension for each sublist. This nested comprehension is something you apply to produce a new sublist, so you put it on the left-hand side.


2

Your solution returned [[None, None, None], [None, None, None], [None, None, None]] because the method append returns the value None. Replacing it by t[0] should do the trick. What you're looking for is: R = [[t[0] for t in l] for l in L]


0

You want the output to be a nested list. You can nest them "by hand" like this : L =[ [[0,1,2],[3,4,5],[6,7,8]], [[0,1,2],[3,4,5],[6,7,8]], [[0,1,2],[3,4,5],[6,7,8]] ] R = [] for l in L: R2 = [] for t in l: r2.append(t[0]) R.append(R2) print 'R=', R


0

L =[ [[0,1,2],[3,4,5],[6,7,8]], [[0,1,2],[3,4,5],[6,7,8]], [[0,1,2],[3,4,5],[6,7,8]] ] R=[] for l in L: temp=[] for t in l: temp.append(t[0]) R.append(temp) print 'R=', R output: R= [[0, 3, 6], [0, 3, 6], [0, 3, 6]]


2

You could do it like this: >>> L = [ [[0,1,2],[3,4,5],[6,7,8]], [[0,1,2],[3,4,5],[6,7,8]], [[0,1,2],[3,4,5],[6,7,8]] ] >>> R = [ [x[0] for x in sl ] for sl in L ] >>> print R [[0, 3, 6], [0, 3, 6], [0, 3, 6]]


1

You want: [i for i in raw_json if i[0] == today] The i is the actual element in the list, not its index.


0

Sure you can stop processing the loop once the else happens: Prelude> let cubesLessThanN int = [if x * x * x <= int then x^3 else error "x is greater than int!" | x <- [0..int]] Prelude> let a = cubesLessThanN 1000 Prelude> a [0,1,8,27,64,125,216,343,512,729,1000,*** Exception: x is greater than int! The exception does not prevent you ...


1

Take a cube root [ x ^ 3 | x <- [ 1 .. ceiling (fromIntegral int ** (1/3)) ], x ^ 3 < int ] For example: λ let int = 1000 in [ x ^ 3 | x <- [ 1 .. ceiling (fromIntegral int ** (1/3)) ], x ^ 3 < int ] :: [Int] [1,8,27,64,125,216,343,512,729]


5

List comprehensions support guards. [x | x <- [0..int], x ^ 3 <= int] Since list comprehensions are sugar for the list monad, this is equivalent to using the guard function in a do block: do x <- [0..int] guard (x ^ 3 <= int) return x If we desugar this into >>= and inline the definitions of >>= and guard: concatMap (\x ...


10

Use takeWhile: cubesLessThanN :: Int -> [Int] cubesLessThanN int = takeWhile ((<= int) . (^3)) [0..]


8

The error message means that your function encode is not considering every single possible case. Think about it this way: what kind of list does this function fail for? As a bigger hint, try enabling warnings in your code. (Do :set -Wall in GHCi.) This will give you a warning if you ever write a function but don't consider all possible cases, and it will ...


0

With some higher-order functions and itertools: from operator import methodcaller from itertools import tee, imap, izip # Broken down into lots of small pieces; recombine as you see fit. # Functions for calling various methods on objects # Example: find_id(x) is the same as x.find('id') find_id = methodcaller('find', 'id') find_title = ...


1

One way, respecting the request that this be solved with a comprehension: id_title_list = [ (elem.find('id').text, title) for elem, title in (elem, elem.find('title').text for elem in root.findall('page')) if title.startswith(('string1', 'string2'))] This uses an internal generator expression to evaluate the find ...


4

There is nothing wrong in breaking it down to a normal loop and having intermediate variables: id_title_list = [] for elem in root.findall('page'): title = elem.find('title').text if title.startswith(('string1', 'string2')): id_title_list.append((elem.find('id').text, title)) Note that startswith() supports multiple prefixes passed in as a ...


1

You can't put a statement in an expression. Ever. That means you can't use a list comprehension if you can't think of a way to write the loop without assignments or other statements. Which is fine—not everything should be a comprehension. There is nothing wrong with for statements. But often, there's a way to rethink the problem so that it doesn't do any ...


0

How about this for example >>> tim= [10,20,30,40,50,60] >>> [ t-tim[tim.index(t)-1] for r in tim[1:] ] [10, 10, 10, 10, 10]


1

Are you looking for this? >>> uniqueUserData = {'TIME' : [5,20,15]} >>> [ uniqueUserData['TIME'][idx-1] - uniqueUserData['TIME'][idx] ... for idx in range(1,len(uniqueUserData['TIME'])) ... ] [-15, 5]


4

Use zip: >>> userdata = [1, 4, 5, 9] >>> zip(userdata, [0] + userdata) [(1, 0), (4, 1), (5, 4), (9, 5)] >>> [time2 - time1 for time2, time1 in zip(userdata, [0] + userdata)] [1, 3, 1, 4] timeDifference = [ time2 - time1 for time2, time1 in zip(uniqueUserData['TIME'], [0] + uniqueUserData['TIME']) ] NOTE You should ...


1

Also consider using zip, like this, for ( (f,s) <- items zip items.drop(1) ) println (s"f: $f, s: $s") f: 1, s: 2 f: 2, s: 3 f: 3, s: 4 f: 4, s: 5 f: 5, s: 6 Or for every third element, for ( (f,t) <- items zip items.drop(3) ) println (s"f: $f, t: $t") f: 1, t: 4 f: 2, t: 5 f: 3, t: 6


7

Here it is: scala> val items = 1 to 6 toList items: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) scala> for(List(first, second) <- items.grouped(2)) println(s"first: $first, second: $second") first: 1, second: 2 first: 3, second: 4 first: 5, second: 6


1

There have been a lot of answers regarding memoizing. The Python 3 standard library now has a lru_cache, which is a Last Recently Used Cache. So you can: from functools import lru_cache @lru_cache() def f(x): # function body here This way your function will only be called once. You can also specify the size of the lru_cache, by default this is 128. ...


2

Just for fun, here's a different way to do this immutably, by using a translation map. If you wanted to replace everything that was in ltrFound, that would be easy: tr = str.maketrans(ltrFound, '*' * len(ltrFound)) print(reveal.translate(tr)) But you want to do the opposite, replace everything that's not in ltrFound. And you don't want to build a ...


2

If you want to do this using a list comprehension, you'd want to replace it letter by letter like this: reveal = "".join((letter if letter in ltrFound else "*") for letter in reveal) Notice that We're iterating over your reveal string, not your ltrFound list (or string). Each item is replaced using the ternary operator letter if letter in ltrFound else ...


1

try this re.sub("[^%s]"%guesses,"*",solution_string) assuming guesses is a string


4

@bheklilr's answer handles the general method of parallelizing strategies, but as I implied in the comment above, the way the original list comprehension is written forces all amicable tests to happen before a parList-based strategy on it can get to its elements and start evaluating them, so I don't think @bheklilr's code will quite work for this specific ...



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