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30

ViewDidLoad is called when your view loading is finished and loadView is called when loading starts. And when you make a new project you see comments on these methods which clearly gives a tip when you should use which function see this /* // Implement loadView to create a view hierarchy programmatically, without using a nib. - (void)loadView { } */ /* ...


15

You can just call [viewController view];.


14

The init methods (yes there is more then one) are where the UIViewController is initialized. Thus this is the place where you do stuff for the UIViewController and not it's views. If you use a nib to load you view then the best place to set any properties is the viewDidLoad method. This method gest called after the nib is loaded. If you set up the view ...


13

You definitely should not be calling [super loadView]. I'd say you found a bug in the ZoomingPDFViewer example. You override loadView when you want to programatically create the view hierarchy for your view controller (not using a xib). As you pointed out, the docs clearly state that you should not call super. Your custom implementation of this method ...


10

loadView: is only invoked when the view property is nil. Use this when creating views programmatically. default: create a UIView object with no subviews. For ex - - (void)loadView { UIView *view = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:[UIScreen mainScreen].applicationFrame]; [view setBackgroundColor:color]; self.view = view; [view release]; } ...


9

- (void) loadView { //self.wantsFullScreenLayout = YES; //could add this for translucent status bars UIView *view = [[[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:[UIScreen mainScreen].applicationFrame] autorelease]; self.view = view; } From Apple's View Controller Programming Guide for creating view programmatically: Create a root view object that ...


9

I have noticed that self.view.frame size does not change but self.view.bounds does on rotation, and bounds represent correct values with respect to current interface orientation.


8

Yes, loadView is responsible for loading nib files automatically from known bundles based on the class name of the view controller. If you override loadView and don't call [super loadView], no nibs will be loaded. The UIViewController class will call loadView when its view property is called and is nil. Also note that overriding loadView and calling super ...


7

viewDidLoad() is to be used when you load your view from a NIB and want to perform any customization after launch LoadView() is to be used when you want to create your view programmatically (without the use of Interface Builder) If it is helpful please Vote me up


6

Only one way to make infinite loop in this case - is getting view property until its not set. If you write next (for example): - (void)loadView { self.view = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:self.view.bounds]; } You'll got infinite loop, but - (void)loadView { self.view = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectZero]; } works OK. So you can't to access ...


6

You need to call the superclass's loadView method when you override it so that it (UITableViewController) can do its thing: - (void)loadView { [super loadView]; // Your implementation here } When your custom subclass has no definition of -loadView, UITableViewController's -loadView method is called instead.


5

you are right at some points :) The init method is being called when the ViewController object is instantiated. The loadView method gets called every time a ViewController should load its view into memory. This can happen before the view is displayed for the first time OR when it should be displayed for a second, third,... time but had been removed from ...


5

First thing you should note is that CGRect's origin and size members use float, so in your NSLog statement you need to use %f, not %d. So for example, NSLog(@"%f %f %f %f", test.origin.x, test.origin.y, test.size.width, test.size.height);


5

Turns out I need to set the dataSource and delegate of my tableView as a part of loading. So when I do this, everything works fine: - (void) loadView { MyTableViewSubclass* tv = [[[MyTableViewSubclass alloc]initWithFrame: CGRectZero style: UITableViewStylePlain]autorelease]; tv.dataSource = self; tv.delegate = self; self.view = tv; ...


4

loadView is called when you access the view property of your view controller and it's nil. If the view has been unloaded (viewDidUnload has been called for memory purpose) then loadView will be called again. If not it will not be called. What you want is viewWillAppear: or viewDidAppear:.


4

If you intend to use IB to build your UI, you should do all your post IB initialization in viewDidLoad. The class will not call loadView at all if you use a nib to initialize a controller. If you initialize the controller in code, the viewController will call loadView first, then viewDidLoad. You can do all your initialization in loadView, or viewDidLoad, ...


4

The docs recommend using [[UIScreen mainScreen] applicationFrame] to get the screen bounds without the status bar


4

Calling [super loadView] will cause the UIViewController implementation of loadView to run. Among other things, this is the method that loads a view from a NIB, if a nibName has been provided. So if you were to call super last, it might overwrite all the view setup you did in your own subclass. If you call super first, this wouldn't be a problem... unless ...


3

My guess is, your app is not crashing actually. It just keeps calling the loadView method repeatedly because you've missed to load the view. Call [super loadView] or create a view and assign it as self.view before you add anything to self.view. The convenient way would be to use [super loadView]. - (void)loadView { [super loadView]; // Your Code ...


3

-didAddSubview: is a method on UIView, not on UIViewController.


3

Since you are just INHERITING what's being implemented in super class(UIViewController), if you don't call super methods, then implementation that needs to be done is NOT done. Almost all super methods do something critical and the local class inheriting super class implementations must either override them all together (unless you know everything about ...


3

I've just found out that viewDidLoad won't be called if you call loadView manually in your application. If you call loadView manually you have to call viewDidLoad manually as well. More over according to apple docs you shouldn't call [super loadView] as it will overwrite your view with a default UIView.


3

Rather than spinning in your viewDidLoad, how about putting up a temporary view until you have your GPS location? // custom full-screen view class of your choice // could just be a UIImageView if you wanted SplashOverlay *splash; - (void)viewDidLoad { [super viewDidLoad]; splash = [[SplashOverlay alloc] initWithNibName:@"SplashOverlay" ...


3

It's very hard to even understand your question. But I'm gonna try to answer it: The iPhone OS uses a stack of views and display the first one to the users. You either pop (remove) or push (add) views to this stack. The code you provided is somewhat "obscure". The best pratice to gain control is to add SubViews to your window or any other view i.e. ...


3

You must have a warning here: NSLog("VIEW DID LOAD!"); Instead, you should write like this (the @ sign is necessary): NSLog(@"VIEW DID LOAD!");


3

You don't need to know the exact size. A VC shouldn't have to size itself, that's the responsibility of its parent. Just create a UIView with [[UIView alloc] init] as confirmed by Apple UIKit Engineer Andy Matuschak on Twitter: https://twitter.com/andy_matuschak/status/365227892151558144


2

It is not an easy job to layout all the view using code. Here are some code: UITextView *textView = [[UITextView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake (100, 100, 100, 100)]; [self.view addSubview:textView]; The frame is the place (the first and second argument is x and y coordinator) and the size (the third and fourth argument is width and height of the text ...


2

Looks like you have some misconceptions about how view controllers work. There are a couple things wrong with those 2 statements: self.view = someViewController.view; According to the docs of UIViewController.view : "Each view controller object is the sole owner of its view. You must not associate the same view object with multiple view controller ...


2

Isn't it obvious? viewDidLoad is called... When the view finishes loading. loadView is called when the view is told to load. Neither is better or worse. It's all dependent on your design. Good luck :)


2

I need to make the background color white in loadView - (void)loadView { GraphView *aGraphView = [[GraphView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectZero]; aGraphView.backgroundColor = [UIColor whiteColor]; self.view = aGraphView; self.graphView = aGraphView; [aGraphView release]; }



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