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3315

How can it be? Isn't the memory of a local variable inaccessible outside its function? You rent a hotel room. You put a book in the top drawer of the bedside table and go to sleep. You check out the next morning, but "forget" to give back your key. You steal the key! A week later, you return to the hotel, do not check in, sneak into your old room with ...


173

What you're doing here is simply reading and writing to memory that used to be the address of a. Now that you're outside of foo, it's just a pointer to some random memory area. It just so happens that in your example, that memory area does exist and nothing else is using it at the moment. You don't break anything by continuing to use it, and nothing else has ...


55

Because the storage space wasn't stomped on just yet. Don't count on that behavior.


49

It's like skipping the red light; you may get to the other side, or you may get hit by a truck!


47

Python variables are scoped to the innermost function or module; control blocks like if and while blocks don't count. (IIUC, this is also how JavaScript's var-declared variables work.)


44

Yes, lifetime of an local variable is within the scope({,}) in which it is created. Local variables have automatic or local storage. Automatic because they are automatically destoryed once the scope within which they are created ends. However, What you have here is an string literal, which is allocated in an implementation defined read only memory. String ...


42

In C++, you can access any address, but it doesn't mean you should. The address you are accessing is no longer valid. It works because nothing else scrambled the memory after foo returned, but it could crash under many circumstances. Try analyzing your program with Valgrind, or even just compiling it optimized, and see...


40

Ruby interpreter initializes a local variable with nil when it sees an assignment to it. It initializes the local variable before it executes the assignment expression or even when the assignment is not reachable (as in the example below). This means your code initializes a with nil and then the expression a = nil will evaluate to the right hand value. a = ...


34

You never throw a C++ exception by accessing invalid memory. You are just giving an example of the general idea of referencing an arbitrary memory location. I could do the same like this: unsigned int q = 123456; *(double*)(q) = 1.2; Here I am simply treating 123456 as the address of a double and write to it. Any number of things could happen: 1) q might ...


32

I had the undefined local variable or method error come up for me too when I was rendering a partial with :locals defined. However, I had a different issue causing my problem, so I thought I would share my solution in case it helps anyone else. (This page was the first result when I googled this error after all) Basically just make sure you use :partial ...


30

myArray is a local variable and as thus the pointer is only valid until the end of its scope (which is in this case the containing function getArray) is left. If you access it later you get undefined behavior. In practice what happens is that the call to printf overwrites the part of the stack used by myArray and it then contains some other data. To fix ...


29

In Ruby local variables only accessible in the scope that they are defined. Whenever you enter/leave a Class, a Module or a Method definiton your scope changes in Ruby. For instance : v1 = 1 class MyClass # SCOPE GATE: entering class v2 = 2 local_variables # => ["v2"] def my_method # SCOPE GATE: entering def v3 = 3 local_variables # ...


27

It's an extreme optimization Doug Lea, the author of the class, likes to use. Here's a post on a recent thread on the core-libs-dev mailing list about this exact subject which answers your question pretty well. from the post: ...copying to locals produces the smallest bytecode, and for low-level code it's nice to write code that's a little closer to ...


27

A little addition to all the answers: if you do something like that: #include<stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> int * foo(){ int a = 5; return &a; } void boo(){ int a = 7; } int main(){ int * p = foo(); boo(); printf("%d\n",*p); } the output probably will be: 7 That is because after returning from foo() the stack is ...


24

If you have a if, for, while, do/while you must follow it with a statement. A declaration is not a statement. From JLS 14.9 - The if Statement IfThenStatement: if ( Expression ) Statement IfThenElseStatement: if ( Expression ) StatementNoShortIf else Statement IfThenElseStatementNoShortIf: if ( Expression ) StatementNoShortIf else ...


23

There are remove_class_variable, remove_instance_variable and remove_const methods but there is currently no equivalent for local variables.


21

local_variables It outputs array of symbols, presenting variables. In your case: [:a, :b]


21

That's because you declared a local variable with the same name - and it masks the global variable. So when you write foo you refer to the local variable. That's true even if you write it before the declaration of that local variable, variables in JavaScript are function-scoped. However, you can use the fact that global variables are properties of the global ...


18

Firstly, the part about variables being "overridden" - final has two very different meanings. For classes and methods, it's about inheritance; for variables it's about being read-only. There's one important "feature" of final local variables: they can be used in local (typically anonymous) inner classes. Non-final local variables can't be. That's the ...


17

If you look at the man file for local (which is actually just the BASH builtins man page), it is treated as its own command, which gives an exit code of 0 upon successfully creating the local variable. So local is overwriting the last-executed error code. Try this: function testing { local test; test="$(return 1)"; echo $?; }; testing EDIT: I went ahead ...


16

The overhead of local variables is zero. Each time you call a function, you are already setting up the stack for the parameters, return values, etc. Adding local variables means that you're adding a slightly bigger number to the stack pointer (a number which is computed at compile time). Also, local variables are probably faster due to cache locality. If ...


15

Yes, they are copied, which is why you have to declare the variable as final. This way, they are guaranteed to not change after the copy has been made. This is different for instance fields, which are accessible even if not final. In this case, the inner class gets a reference to the outer instance that it uses for this purpose. private Environment env; ...


15

No. int has an undefined default value. It just happens to be 1 in this case. It could just as easily be -18382 or 22 or 0xBAADF00D. Always initialize your variables in C.


14

Well for a start the code with the threadvar is invalid syntax. A threadvar needs to have unit scope rather than local scope. Local variable Each invocation (including from different threads, and re-entrant calls) of a function results in different instances of that function's local variables. Thread local variable A thread local variable has separate ...


14

Did you compile you program with the optimiser enabled ? The foo() function is quite simple and might have been inlined/replaced in the resulting code. But I aggree with Mark B that the resulting behavior is undefined.


14

On many platforms/ABIs, the entire stackframe (including memory for every local variable) is allocated when you enter the function. On others, it's common to push/pop memory bit by bit, as it is needed. Of course, in cases where the entire stackframe is allocated in one go, different compilers might still decide on different stack frame sizes. In your case, ...


14

String literals are valid for the whole program (and are not allocated not the stack), so it will be valid. Also, string literals are read-only, so (for good style) maybe you should change foo to const char *foo(int)


14

Within each category of storage classes (except dynamically alloated objects), objects are destructed in the reverse order of construction.


14

From what I have learned about .NET, it is not possible to access variables across different threads. Please correct me if that statement is wrong, it's just what I have read somewhere. That statement is completely false, so consider this your correction. You probably read somewhere that local variables cannot be accessed across different threads. ...


13

In Ruby, most uninitialized or even non-existing variables evaluate to nil. This is true for local variables, instance variables and global variables: defined? foo #=> nil local_variables #=> [] if false foo = 42 end defined? foo #=> 'local-variable' local_variables #=> [:foo] foo #=> nil foo.nil? ...



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