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0

I would set a CSS class on the body tag to hold the current locale: <body class="<%= I18n.locale %>"> </body> And then you can target that class in your SASS: body.en $main-font: "Whitney SSm A", "Whitney SSm B", "Microsoft_YaHei247019", "Verdana" body.cn $main-font: "Microsoft_YaHei247019", "Whitney SSm A", "Whitney SSm B", ...


1

To resurrect a very old post; can the OP confirm the version of MS Office that being used? The problem appears to be with MS Office 2003 running on Windows XP. But then it could be on a higher OS version, too. It would appear that MS Word applies the Mangal font for Hindi script [Encoding standard: Indic: Hindi ISCII 57002 (Devanagari)]. The following link ...


0

Never mind, I actually found a solution which does not involve dynamic localization. As proposed by will Farrrell, I detect the user's locale right in the header of my index.html and load the according locale: var locale = window.navigator.userLanguage || window.navigator.language; if (locale) { var smallLocale = locale.toLowerCase(); ...


1

The commands interpretation and interpret only register those facts from locales that are not already in scope from previous interpretations. The ring locale is a sub-locale of comm_group with the prefix add and precisely the parameter instantiation you are giving in the first interpretation. Since all these facts are already available (albeit under a ...


0

If you use psql, you can execute this: \pset numericlocale Example: test=# create temporary table a (a numeric(20,10)); CREATE TABLE test=# insert into a select random() * 1000000 from generate_series(1,3); INSERT 0 3 test=# select * from a; a ------------------- 287421.6944910590 140297.9311533270 887215.3805568810 (3 rows) ...


0

Assuming that Flask-Babel uses a request context scoped locale setting, you could try running your code with a temporary request context: with app.request_context(environ): do_something_with(request) See http://flask.pocoo.org/docs/0.10/api/#flask.Flask.request_context


0

I encountered a similar problem as you did. Alternatively, you can write the meta tag as <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"> to bypass this issue. However, the current HTML5 meta tag format <meta charset="UTF-8"> would cause another error as com.google.gwt.core.client.JavaScriptException: (TypeError) ...


0

This is not a perfect answer, but the following workaround solved the problem for me. I tried to understand the behavior or R, and make the example so that my R script produces the same results both on Windows and on Linux platform: (1) Get XML data in UTF-8 from the Internet library(XML) url <- ...


0

You need to parse your text with date to Date instance and then format it back to text. You can do it with SimpleDateFormat class which supports many patterns of dates like dd/MM/yyyy for your original date, and EEEE for full name of day in month. While formatting you will also need to specify locale you want to use. To create Norway specific locale ...


0

You can use date parsing combined with Locale settings to get the desired output. For e.g. refer following code. String dateStr = "29/04/2015"; SimpleDateFormat dtf = new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy"); Date dt = dtf.parse(dateStr); Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance(); cal.setTime(dt); String m = cal.getDisplayName(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, ...


0

final int SUNDAY = 1; final int ONSDAG = 2; final int TORSDAG = 3; .... .... String s = "29/04/2015"; DateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("MM/dd/yyyy"); Date date = dateFormat.parse(s); Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance(); calendar.setTime(date); int day = calendar.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK); String dayString; switch (day) { ...


-4

You can use an HashMap map where the first parametri is the date "29/4/2015" while the second is the meaning. You can use your string to get the meaning map.get (yourString).


0

First you will need to parse the String to a Date. Then use a Calendar to get the day of the week. You can use an array to convert it to the appropriate string. // Array of Days final String[] DAYS = { "søndag", "mandag", "tirsdag", "onsdag", "torsdag", "fredag", "lørdag" }; // Parse the date final String source = "27/04/2015"; final DateFormat format = ...


0

You need to configure an instance of DateFormat, with your locale, (take a look at https://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/Locale.html). then parse the Date and get the day, as Dilip already suggests.


0

First you'll need a Calendar object. Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance(); String s = "29/04/2015" SimpleDateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy"); cal.setTime(format.parse(s)); From the Calendar you can get the day of the week. int dayOfWeek = cal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK); dayOfWeek will be 1-7 with Sunday (in english) being 1


2

String dateString = "29/04/2015"; DateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("MM/dd/yyyy"); Date date = dateFormat.parse(dateString); SimpleDateFormat formatter = new SimpleDateFormat("E", Locale.no_NO); String day = formatter.format(date); Now day will have the day in given locale. Update


1

There may be an easier way than this (see other answers), but this one is most robust, and as long as the general principle of localizing an app through a strings-file doesn't get obsoleted, this method will work. Generally, you don't need to get the application locale (but read on, it's possible!) If you want localized text, you use NSLocalizedString(). If ...


0

you can get selected language using following code. `NSString * language = [[NSLocale preferredLanguages] objectAtIndex:0]`; if ([language isEqualToString:@"fr"]){//Franch [do your stuff] } else{//English [do your stuff] } List_of_ISO_639-1_codes Hope this will help you.


2

The selected answer returns the current device language, but not the actual language used in the app. If you don't provide a localization for the preferred language in your app NSString *language = [[[NSBundle mainBundle] preferredLocalizations] objectAtIndex:0] NSLocale *locale = [NSLocale currentLocale]; NSString *countryCode = [locale objectForKey: ...


0

let language = NSBundle.mainBundle().preferredLocalizations.first as NSString


0

You can get country code from locale, this way, NSLocale *currentLocale = [NSLocale currentLocale]; // get the current locale. NSString *countryCode = [currentLocale objectForKey:NSLocaleCountryCode]; Get country code, e.g. es (Spain), fr (France), etc. You can map this code for your interface selection. Hope this help you.


1

If you need to use the locale in a query, you can try to get the locale in the controller and then use it as parameter in the repository function: $locale = $this->get('request')->getLocale(); $result = $this->getDoctrine()->getRepository('AcmeMyBundle:MyEntity')->findNtecByIdAndLocaleOrSomething($id, $locale); The problem with this ...


0

You have to create an Event listener: namespace EVTS\FrontendBundle\EventListener; use Symfony\Component\HttpKernel\Event\GetResponseEvent; class LocaleListener { protected $locale; public function onKernelRequest(GetResponseEvent $event) { $this->locale = $event->getRequest()->getLocale(); } public function ...


0

It is not good approach to try to inject dependency of request/session to your repository. It will make additional troubles for you like if you will need to use the repository at a console command. You can take a look to Translatable extension https://github.com/l3pp4rd/DoctrineExtensions/blob/master/doc/translatable.md Also possible way is create own ...


0

The "usual" way is to start with a given last day and count up a day on each iteration. for ($i = 0; $i < 7; $i++) { $weekDayNames[] = strftime("%a", strtotime("last sunday +$i day")); }


1

It says in the Currency specification: getSymbol() gets the symbol of this currency for the default locale. For example, for the US Dollar, the symbol is "$" if the default locale is the US, while for other locales it may be "US$". If no symbol can be determined, the ISO 4217 currency code is returned. EDITED I have found a way around this issue ...


0

Here is one simple way to store them. It's by no means the only way, nor necessarily the best, but I think it's reasonably sound and understandable. The code is for Sql Server but other database systems should be very similar. create table Sizes ( CountryCode NVARCHAR(3), Size INT, constraint PX_Sizes primary key(CountryCode,Size) //other ...


0

I post it as an answer: In my bean id="localeResolver" I define SessionLocaleResolver as "resolver". So now a new code like this: protected void initFilterBean() throws ServletException { try { sessionLocaleResolver = new SessionLocaleResolver(); //System.out.println("DEBUG FILTER LOCALE SLR - INIT: Got SLR "); } catch (Exception e) { ...


0

I managed to solve this issue by using the option to use SSH to connect to the jenkins slave. Through this option, jenkins creates the setup on the slave machine via SSH and starts the slave.jar process. Most probably, it was a bug in Jenkins that does not update/override the language when using Java Web start.


0

I have found a way in the answer provided by MiroM to this question on StackOverflow. Add the following code to your base Activity class, wherever it is best suited. PackageManager pm = getPackageManager(); try { ActivityInfo ai = pm.getActivityInfo(this.getComponentName(), PackageManager.GET_ACTIVITIES|PackageManager.GET_META_DATA); if ...


0

According to this answer the title is read only, so you should specify the title manually and cannot do it automatically. My guess is because it uses resource specified in AndroidManifest.xml which cannot be changed dynamically.


1

Since the time you originally asked this question, JavaScript is finally acquiring some decent locale support, including for collation. Read up on the new EcmaScript 6 / Harmony features Intl and, specifically, Intl.Collator. The documentation doesn't actually make it very clear that both modern and traditional sort orders are supported for Finnish, but ...


1

You need to check desired Locale every time you open a new page and change it before page has been rendered. You can achieve it by using <f:event type="preRenderView" ...> look at this question for details: Initializng a Backing Bean With Parameters on Page Load with JSF 2.0


0

You can use the code below. For example, the functions presented below may be placed inside the class extended the Application class. public class MyApplication extends Application { ... public static String APP_LANG; private Context ctx = getBaseContext(); private Resources res = ctx.getResources(); public SharedPreferences ...


2

Some people have published a few. See for example https://github.com/caouecs/Laravel-lang


0

You schould look to jvm parameters on old server. Your language parameters will change comma to dot actually so you do not need any code changes.


0

Rather use NumberFormat for parsing: NumberFormat format = NumberFormat.getInstance(Locale.FRANCE); Number number = format.parse("0000000000000000009011,00"); double d = number.doubleValue(); This way you can select the right locale for the number representation. In the example above I used France - they use a comma for the decimal point.


0

I think its not due to java version. Replace comma(,) with "" or period(.) For example conside a string : String str = "0000000000000000009011,00"; Now you can try - double result = Double.valueOf(str.replace(",", ".")); or double result = Double.valueOf(str.replace(",", ""));


4

Thousands separators in an input stream are optional. If they are present, they must be placed correctly, but they don't have to be present. Thus, 2015 is a valid input to convert to an number regardless of std::numpunct.


0


0

Best answer above from Gags. If you want the contents of the accept-language: header from the current request, if there is one, use: $_SERVER['HTTP_ACCEPT_LANGUAGE']


0

Having thought more about the problem and the particular setup I have, I came up with this solution, which seems to work. Note that I don't have control over what languages I need to support: there are translation files dropped into a predefined place and system locales installed by someone else. During runtime, I need to support a particular language if ...


0

I can suggest using this regex: \b\d+(?:\.\d+){3}\b It should be used with Multiline option. See demo. The result is inside Group 1. See this sample code: import re p = re.compile(ur'\b\d+(?:\.\d+){3}\b', re.MULTILINE) test_str = u"eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:18:F3:BE:18:1E\n inet addr:192.168.10.15 Bcast:192.168.10.255 ...


0

import re tempstr='blah blah 172.16.13.35 blah blah 23.85.85.94' matches = re.findall(r'\d+[.]\d+[.]\d+[.]\d+', tempstr) for match in matches: print match This code will print all the ip found in given string tempstr. output of program is 172.16.13.35 23.85.85.94


3

Let me explain my process on how I tackled this. First, I found this block of code in LocalePicker.java private static String getDisplayName(Locale l, String[] specialLocaleCodes, String[] specialLocaleNames) { String code = l.toString(); for (int i = 0; i < specialLocaleCodes.length; i++) { if (specialLocaleCodes[i].equals(code)) { ...


1

The following illustrates what was happening and how to fix it: root@df329ec1fe88:/# python3 Python 3.4.0 (default, Apr 11 2014, 13:05:11) [GCC 4.8.2] on linux Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information. >>> import codecs >>> codecs.decode(b'\xe2\x80\x99','utf8') '\u2019' >>> exit() root@df329ec1fe88:/# ...


0

This sounds like a locale configuration issue. Python could be behaving differently in the two locations because the terminal sessions it's running in are configured differently. Check your locale settings on your Ubuntu Docker machine to see that you're in a UTF-8 locale in your terminal session. In particular, see if you've been switched over to C for ...


0

Because I still can't comment, do I need to give an "answer"... I would say, find via the client's IP the geo location and tell via the IP the region of the client. Maybe this would help: ...


0

Add the region route on top of all other routes, I have similar feature for a project and that fixed it for me. Route::get('{region?}/businesses', array( 'as' => 'regionBusinesses', 'uses' => 'RegionBusinessesController@getBusinesses' ))->where('region', '.*'); In your Controller class RegionBusinessesController extends SomeController { ...


0

You should call setGrouping(boolean) to make sure grouping is turned on. NumberFormat numberFormat = NumberFormat.getInstance(getResources().getConfiguration().locale); if (numberFormat instanceof DecimalFormat) { final DecimalFormat df = (DecimalFormat)numberFormat; df.setDecimalSeparatorAlwaysShown(true); df.setGroupingUsed(true); ...



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