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93

All approaches that test the existence of "lock files" are flawed. Why? Because there is no way to check whether a file exists and create it in a single atomic action. Because of this; there is a race condition that WILL make your attempts at mutual exclusion break. Instead, you need to use mkdir. mkdir creates a directory if it doesn't exist yet, and ...


57

Here's an implementation that uses a lockfile and echoes a PID into it. This serves as a protection if the process is killed before removing the pidfile: LOCKFILE=/tmp/lock.txt if [ -e ${LOCKFILE} ] && kill -0 `cat ${LOCKFILE}`; then echo "already running" exit fi # make sure the lockfile is removed when we exit and then claim it trap "rm ...


30

There's a wrapper around the flock(2) system call called, unimaginatively, flock(1). This makes it relatively easy to reliably obtain exclusive locks without worrying about cleanup etc. There are examples on the man page as to how to use it in a shell script.


16

Another option is to use shell's noclobber option by running set -C. Then > will fail if the file already exists. In brief: set -C lockfile="/tmp/locktest.lock" if echo "$$" > "$lockfile"; then echo "Successfully acquired lock" # do work rm "$lockfile" # XXX or via trap - see below else echo "Cannot acquire lock - already locked ...


8

This might be of help to you: lockfile


7

If you can use GPLv2, Mercurial has a module for that: http://bitbucket.org/mirror/mercurial/src/tip/mercurial/lock.py Example usage: from mercurial import error, lock try: l = lock.lock("/path/to/lock", timeout=600) # wait at most 10 minutes # do something except error.LockHeld: # couldn't take the lock else: l.release()


5

.lck is used by the handler(file handler) to lock the file in order to delete this file. You need to close the Handler that is associated with that logger object before you close your program. Here is sample lines how you can close associated handler: for(Handler h:log.getHandlers()) { h.close(); //must call h.close or a .LCK file will remain. } ...


5

Create a lock file in a known location and check for existence on script start? Putting the PID in the file might be helpful if someone's attempting to track down an errant instance that's preventing execution of the script.


5

I would do the lock/unlock in the same target as file-maker: file.out: file.in lockfile $@.lock file-maker < $< > $@; \ status=$$?; \ rm -f $@.lock; \ exit $$status This executes the file-maker and unlock steps in the same shell, saving the status of file-maker so make will fail if file-maker fails.


4

Really quick and really dirty? This one-liner on the top of your script will work: if [ `ps -e | grep -c $(basename $0)` -gt 2 ]; then exit 0; fi Of course, just make sure that your script name is unique. :)


4

The PID is stored in $$ Like echo $$ > thisscriptpidfile


4

What is about using "GIT_INDEX_FILE" environment variable to make the git to use another index file? So, to create a new index file from HEAD use GIT_INDEX_FILE=.git/other-index git reset and after it you could just GIT_INDEX_FILE=.git/other-index git status to lookup for changes. The downside of it, you will not see the real status if the main ...


3

This is kind of a kludge, but it works: all: @$(MAKE) file.out || $(MAKE) unlock_id


3

By default, LockFileEx blocks until the lock can be acquired (although you can tell it not to with LOCKFILE_FAIL_IMMEDIATELY). Clearly this isn't cross-platform. Update This horrible code sample illustrates that it works (you'll probably need to change the filename in CreateFile from "lockBlock.cpp"). Run one instance of the program and it will acquire ...


3

If flock's limitations, which have already been described elsewhere on this thread, aren't an issue for you, then this should work: #!/bin/bash { # exit if we are unable to obtain a lock; this would happen if # the script is already running elsewhere flock -x -n 100 || exit # put commands to run here sleep 100 } 100>/tmp/myjob.lock ...


3

Actually although the answer of bmdhacks is almost good, there is a slight chance the second script to run after first checked the lockfile and before it wrote it. So they both will write the lock file and they will both be running. Here is how to make it work for sure: lockfile=/var/lock/myscript.lock if ( set -o noclobber; echo "$$" > "$lockfile") ...


3

But when I wrap that same code in a bash script file, it always returns 0 as the exit code. This is because when you execute the script again, the PID of the process executing the script has changed. As such, the --use-pid flag causes lockfile-create into thinking that the lock file needs to be overwritten. Depending upon your use case, you might ...


3

PID and lockfiles are definitely the most reliable. When you attempt to run the program, it can check for the lockfile which and if it exists, it can use ps to see if the process is still running. If it's not, the script can start, updating the PID in the lockfile to its own.


3

Some unixes have lockfile which is very similar to the already mentioned flock. From the manpage: lockfile can be used to create one or more semaphore files. If lock- file can't create all the specified files (in the specified order), it waits sleeptime (defaults to 8) seconds and retries the last file that didn't succeed. You can ...


3

I believe you will find the necessary information here. The page in question refers to a package for building daemons in python: this process involves creating a PID lockfile.


2

There is a recipe on ActiveState on creating lockfiles. To generate the filename you can use os.getpid() to get the PID.


2

lock files are commonly used in Unix/Linux to ensure exclusive or serial access to an important resource. In this case, the resource is the log file itself--you wouldn't want two or more logger instances trying to write to the same log file at the same time. That would not work out well at all. More about file locking As Peter Barrett says about the Java ...


2

I've used it. My company had an very NFS-intensive infrastructure at one point (less so now) and many Perl sysadmin tools dating back to the mid 90s. We wrapped lockfile in a perl module so that we could do consistent locking across NFS mounts. For that matter, our home directories were NFS mounted and we used procmail to deliver mail into them using the ...


2

Quick and dirty? #!/bin/sh if [ -f sometempfile ] echo "Already running... will now terminate." exit else touch sometempfile fi ..do what you want here.. rm sometempfile


2

The answer to your question is provided at the bottom of the link(2) page of the Linux Programmer's Manual: On NFS file systems, the return code may be wrong in case the NFS server performs the link creation and dies before it can say so. Use stat(2) to find out if the link got created.


2

A lock file will be the only way if you want to display additional information.


2

Locking the file does not prevent the lock holder from writing: the purpose of the lock is to prevent other processes accessing the locked portion.


2

From the MSDN article for LockFile(): Locks the specified file for exclusive access by the calling process. Well, that surely worked. Your test is not verifying if another process is locked out of the file.


2

From the manual: "Only a single process may possess an exclusive lock to a given file at a time." Anyway, this is a bad way to implement locking. For example, what you can do is to write something in a file and delete it when your script stops. That way, you can check if there is an other process running by checking if the file is empty.



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