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3

If Joe removed both of those locks, what thread safety issue could arise? It could lead to 'stale data', the reading code could cache it and only see an old value. This usage of lock is a-typical, it is profiting from a side-effect of lock: it has an implied memory-barrier, and that prevents seeing an old copy. You would more usally see a volatile ...


3

Readers might never see _status update to a new value, for example. All reads might be collapsed into one physical read. Also, I think you might see partially initialized objects in case _status was committed to memory before the fields in the object being referenced. Note, that this locking has nothing to do with the object being referenced. This is about ...


0

if two exact request's arrives at the same time then returns one of them with orginaly :) You can know which is not trunslated then send it again. i made this before like this


0

I don't think you'll get the behavior that you're looking for: the variable "key" will always be a newly created object and the current thread will always be granted the lock right away. I don't believe string interning will be in play here because the "key" variable is not a literal. If "key" were an interned string, then it might work like you want, but ...


0

Something like this? // this cache is probably going to be the application level cache in asp.net // but using Dictionary as an example in this case Dictionary<string,TranslationResult> cache = new ... private static object syncRoot = new Object(); if (!cache.ContainsKey(key) { lock(syncRoot) { // this double checks is not a mistake. ...


1

The transaction is aborted and the lock is released. Since the transaction is aborted, no updates made in the transaction prior to the exception are committed. http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.1/static/explicit-locking.html


0

T2 cannot lock D as its parent is not locked by T2 at the time.


3

There's no direct relationship. pthread_mutex_lock() is a userspace API, implemented in the C library. On Linux, it's usually based on the kernel futex() system call. mutex_lock() is an internal kernel API, implemented within the kernel itself and only available there. It's based around spinlocks and direct manipulation of the current task's schedulable ...


0

You can use a SemaphoreSlim to do an asynchronous wait. Also, once you do that you won't need the external Task.Run, but I've left it in. You can use Task.Delay rather than Thread.Sleep as the former does not block the current thread, waits asynchronously and can also be cancelled via a CancellationToken. private SemaphoreSlim semaphore = new ...


0

In my app the best solution was: copy dir with files to another, tmp. catalog (with guid name) use tmp files per user delete tmp catalog with files in it In my app there is: each request is 1 min long max users is 120 (intranet application) nobody want to wait 5-10 min for raport to generate Copy few files add about 0,01-0,2 sek. for each request, ...


3

We can pretty easily do full hand-over-hand locking as we traverse this list using just a bit of unsafe, which is necessary to tell the borrow checker a small bit of insight that we are aware of, but that it can't know. But first, let's clearly formulate the problem: We want to traverse a linked list whose nodes are stored as Arc<Mutex<Node>> ...


2

You need some strategy to ensure that all client requests for "the next ID" are coordinated. At the database level, this is usually handled by a sequence. For a discussion of simulating sequences in MySQL, see MySQL equivalent of Oracle's SEQUENCE.NEXTVAL The C# application would query the sequence in MySQL to get the next available number. Note ...


2

The problem is you're using a local lock that actually doesn't lock anything. It is instantiated in the thread so it's not shared across threads. The solution is sharing a global lock across threads. On the first script you should send the "global" lock to the threads. Change this: t1 = threading.Thread(target=camera.action, args=(1, 10, 1)) t2 = ...


0

I created a third file called util.py: from threading import Lock cameraLock = Lock() and now I call it from the camera file: util.cameraLock.acquire() The hint from Daniel was good but unfortunately not the answer for the question though. Thanks anyway.


0

You're instantiating the lock inside your thread target. That means every thread gets its own lock, which defeats the whole purpose. You need to instantiate it outside the function.


0

Check the user which is used to run the job. Maybe the user password is expired or the user is no longer active.


0

Get the date when the values were updated and the current date and use the DatePart function to extract the year and quarter: updatedYear = DatePart("yyyy", DateLastUpdated) updatedQuarter = DatePart("q", DateLastUpdated) curYear = DatePart("yyyy", Now) curQuarter = DatePart("q", Now) Then compare the year and the quarter to see if the values were updated ...


0

This is still not the answer your literal question of to how to do hand-over-hand locking, which should only be important in a concurrent setting (or if someone else forced you to use Mutex references to nodes). It is instead how to do this with Rc and RefCell, which you seem to be interested in. RefCell only allows mutable writes when one mutable reference ...


0

I believe this to fit the criteria of hand-over-hand locking. use std::sync::Mutex; fn main() { // Create a set of mutexes to lock hand-over-hand let mutexes = Vec::from_fn(4, |_| Mutex::new(false)); // Lock the first one let val_0 = mutexes[0].lock(); if !*val_0 { // Lock the second one let mut val_1 = ...


0

can you specify the table engine? if your table is InnoDB, then 2 insert statements can occur at the same time wheres MyISAM engine, will LOCK table for insert operation, preventing other inserts to occur. if InnoDB is not required for you, if you will change it to MyISAM, mysql engine will take care that ONLY one insert can occur, and other will block ...


0

This thread is parked and not blocked. Threads enter the parked state through the java.util.concurrent API. Parked threads are listed as parked on the blocker object that was passed to the underlying java.util.concurrent.locks.LockSupport.park() method, if such an object was supplied. If a blocker object was not supplied, threads are listed as Parked on: ...


0

As per the properties of MySQL, It will not allow two data to be inserted at the same time. So you don't need to take any precautions against it. check the below link http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/internal-locking.html


0

To know how to handle OptimisticLockException you have first to consider how optimistic locking works. When using this policy your entity gets a version field or property that is annotated with @Version and which you can map to a column in the database if you want. By default when optimistic locking is used the JPA provider compares the value the @Version ...


1

The short answer: reliable file based locking in Java is not practical. The long answer: The issue with file based locking, in any OS, always comes down to what kind of storage system the file comes from. Almost all network accessed file systems (NFS, SAMBA, etc) have very unreliable (or at least unpredictable) synchronizations on file creates or deletes ...


0

SerialPort sp; public byte[] SendCommand(byte[] command) { //System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(100); lock (sp) { Console.Out.WriteLine("ENTER"); try { string base64 = Convert.ToBase64String(command); string request = String.Format("{0}{1}\r", target_UID, base64); ...


1

In the related answer you are referring to: Postgres Update, limit 1 The objective is to lock one row at a time. This works fine with or without advisory locks, because there is no chance for a deadlock - as long as you don't try to lock more rows in the same transaction. Your example is different in that you want to lock 3000 rows at a time. There is ...


1

You will have deadlocks with this approach. You could avoid them by simply using order by id in subquery. But it will prevent any concurrent running of this queries, as concurrent queries will always try first to mark the lowest free id, and block until the first client will commit. I don't think this is a problem if you process say less than one batch per ...


0

What you need is advisory locks. SELECT id FROM cargo_item WHERE pg_try_advisory_lock(id) LIMIT 3000 FOR UPDATE will place an advisory lock on the rows and the other processes will not see the rows if the same pg_try_advisory_lock(id) function is used in the where. Remember to unlock the rows using pg_advisory_unlock


2

You should be able to open your file as Dmitry Popov suggested in his answer as below and not affect Python writing to it, however it depends upon what locks the Python application holds on the file, it can lock you out completely and there is nothing you to do to prevent that without hacking Windows. FileSream fs = File.Open(@"c:\Test.txt", FileMode.Open, ...


0

See this question "Downloading over 1000 files in python" (link) for examples of using a worker thread pool. Basically you split up all of the work beforehand, put the work into a queue and let a pool of worker threads process each piece of work. The workers put the results onto a another queue which can be processed by another thread to put all of the ...


0

You can combine FileShare flags: FileShare.Write | FileShare.Delete Here's a demo: using (var cSharp = new FileStream(filename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.Write | FileShare.Delete)) { // The Python service will be able to change and to rename the file: using (var python = new FileStream(filename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Write, ...


1

I would move the connect call from the getInstance static method to the SingeltonDB constructor. This will guarantee that the db is opened whenever you get a reference to the static db field. I would also add the db == null check to all non-static methods. public class SingeltonDB { private static DBconnImpl db = null; private static SingeltonDB ...


1

You need to lock around the access to the object both when reading the data as well as when writing to the data. Synchronizing around only the writes is not safe. Nothing prevents your AfterLock method from actually running after your Lock method. It can just as easily run before it, or, since you're not properly synchronizing around the read, they can ...


1

using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(path, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.Read)) { //Do works } C# thread don't lock the file in this case, your Python script can write and close the file to create another one without deadlock.


6

The volatile keyword is never a solution to synchronization problems. The bug is clearly visible, you made a hard assumption that the DataReceived event handler is not going to execute again before ParseAnswers() consumed the string and finished running. That's wishful thinking, your code crashes when the event handler fires again and replaces the string ...


2

You can call lock.acquire(False) for a nonblocking call and use the return value to determine if a lock has been acquired. This would look like this: def _renew(self): # calling when the lock is already acquired # will not block and return False if not lock.acquire(False): event.wait() return # else we acquired the lock ...


5

This is why we recommend to use lock on a private readonly field. Your dataReceived could be changed by another thread in _port_DataReceived method(since access is not synchronized) while it is executing ParseAnswers for previous event. So what happens, now two threads race to the lock(_dataReceived), they both are permitted because both use different ...


0

Ok, I found a solution myself. After a lot of searching and digging in the code, the solution was fairly simple. All I had to do was add: android:configChanges="orientation|screenSize" ... to all my Activities in the manifest file. This tells the app that I will handle configuration changes myself in the code. Instead of doing this, I didn't add any ...


0

I would suggest you pass your results back to the root process, and let the root process write them to the SQLite database. The pseudocode would look something like this: load list of data if rank == 0: for _ in len(data): result = receive from any worker save result else: select chunk of data process data send result(s) to ...


-1

Although not the answer to your literal question (hand-over locking), union-find with weighted-union and path-compression can be very simple in Rust: fn unionfind<I: Iterator<(uint, uint)>>(mut iterator: I, nodes: uint) -> Vec<uint> { let mut root = Vec::from_fn(nodes, |x| x); let mut rank = Vec::from_elem(nodes, 0u8); for ...


0

Try setting up the orientation directly in the manifest instead of programmatically. Under your activity tag in AndroidManifest.xml add android:screenOrientation="landscape". This should force the activity to be directly created in the correct orientation.


1

You should lock on a dedicated object, not the one you're trying to use. class Example { private object cacheLock; public static void Load() { // . . . lock (cacheLock) { CacheTable = (ThreadSafeDictionary<String, ThreadSafeDictionary<Object, Object>>)CacheTableTmp.Clone(); ...


1

I didn't choose ConcurrentDictionary since its value might not be consistent. If you only use GetOrAdd(TKey, Func<TKey, TValue>) and don't call any other methods on the ConcurrentDictionary (like AddOrUpdate()), then the value will be consistent: for a given key, GetOrAdd() will always return the same value. What is not guaranteed is that only ...


0

On IRC, Jonathan Reem pointed out that inner is borrowing until the end of its lexical scope, which is too far for what I was asking. Inlining it produces the following, which compiles without error: fn find_root(x: Arc<Mutex<Node>>) -> Arc<Mutex<Node>> { let mut ans = x.clone(); while ans.lock().parent.is_some() { ...


2

Why we need private obj? It doesn't actually have to be private, the code would work just as well with a public object. And you can lock on any object. But it is a best practice to hide the lock object as much as possible, and only make it accessible to the code that actually needs it. This helps to prevent deadlocks.


0

MySQL 5.7.5 and MariaDB 10.0.2 both support your use case now. For MySQL see: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/miscellaneous-functions.html#function_get-lock For MariaDB see: https://mariadb.com/kb/en/mariadb/documentation/functions-and-operators/miscellaneous-functions/get_lock/


4

To open a ACCDB in exclusive mode you need to add this key/value to your connection string Mode=Share Exclusive; This will block other user to connect to the same database until you close and dispose the connection that opens the database in this way. If I remember well, the possible values (pretty self explanatory) for the Mode keyword in the JET ...


0

No. This approach not thread-safe. Look at this scenario: Your function Class1::JobsCount::set in thread 1 locks m_aoJobs Function 1 in thread 2 try to locks m_aoJobs, but cannot do it and wait Your function Class1::JobsCount::set in thread 1 replace m_aoJobs with new one and unlock old m_aoJobs Function 2 in thread 3 lock new m_aoJobs Function 1 in thread ...


0

The trick you came with might prevent concurrent accesses between the different parts of you code but it is not going to prevent Array::Resize from working with the array at the same time as another part of your code. It all depends on how Array::Resize is implemented. If the method sets the new value of m_aoJobs just before returning, once the elements of ...


1

Correct me if I am wrong but I think you are misunderstanding what Monitor::Lock does. Even if you call Monitor::Lock(m_aoJobs), it is not going to prevent a concurrent access from an other piece of code that do not call Monitor::Lock prior to accessing the array. The solution is simple: have a dummy object that is only used as an argument to ...



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