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0

The .hg repository (normally under the source/checkout root) is available at .git/hg/.hg/. The lock can be removed from there following Mercurial stuck "waiting for lock".


0

I'm assuming you mean Atlassian Stash, not git stash? If so, you can use branch permissions to enforce a workflow that only allows certain users to write to a branch (such as master), and/or to allow changes only via pull requests. Combined with pull request settings that require a minimum number of approvals you can achieve a strict change management ...


-1

Did you look at read write locks? Take a look here & this stackoverflow answer.


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This article probably contains all the information you need. The question is indeed very broad, but let me try to explain how I use each as an example: Event - Use it when you need threads to communicate a certain state was met so they can both work together in sync. I use it mostly for initiation process of two threads where one dependes on the other. ...


1

Try to find your directory by running the following command - find / -name ".hg/store/" -> / will start looking your directory from root folder. Run the command as root user to access all the folder. Then follow the post mercurial-stuck-waiting-for-lock


1

The answer is simple: ConcurrentLinkedQueue is not a BlockingQueue, but LinkedBlockingQueue is. The ThreadPoolExecutor constructors expect BlockingQueues, so that Executors creates instances also with other implementations of BlockingQueue, like SynchronousQueue or ArrayBlokingQueue (depending on the factory method you call in Executors). So, the more ...


1

If you submit Runnable objects to the queue and there are no running threads to consume those tasks, they of course will not be executed. When the queue becomes empty, the pool must block and wait for more tasks. So, to implement this behavior we are using BlockingQueue while interacting with pool.


1

With the performance timings that you've described, you will probably find that you can get away with the function you've shown. At least, until that day when the processing takes extra long because of forces out of your control. The basic structure of your lock handling is OK, but you are doing too much inside the try..catch. Note that any exception will ...


0

I sometimes use a decorator like this: def synchronized(f): @functools.wraps(f) def wrapper(self, *args, **kwargs): try: _ = self._lock except AttributeError: self._lock = threading.Lock() with self._lock: return f(self, *args, **kwargs) return wrapper This solution has a race ...


2

I am wondering if this code would work? It depends on what the scope of the Stack is. If you're returning the stack where someone can externally modify it, don't use it as a lock. This also means that GetCorrectStack must be thread safe, because a List<T> is not. You can definitely use ConcurrentStack instead for thread-safety. You could also use ...


0

Since the lock is a static variable there's only one such lock object per appdomain which excludes a lot of possible bugs. Here's the only reason for this problem I can think of: Your lock only works in one appdomain. ASP.NET can run apps in multiple app domains at the same time for example when recycling, deploying or in web garden mode. Also, you might ...


1

if statement can't be executed alone, it needs block after it for the true-case of expression, so, as @Mureinik already said, lock locks your entire initialization block. You can even write it like this: lock (LockObject) if (instance == null) instance = Instance(); However, this is not recommended to write your code without curly braces in such cases as ...


1

Lock is translated by the C# compiler to Monitor.Enter and Monitor.Exit. This C# code static void Main(string[] args) { lock (LockObject) if (instance == null) instance = Instance(); Console.WriteLine(instance == null); } gives the IL code below, which clearly shows that Monitor.Exit (L_0036) is called after instance is ...


0

This code snippet is locking both lines of code. Lock on LockObject won't be released until if statement has finished execution. It means, if your condition in line 2 is true then it's going to execute line 3 before releasing the lock in line 1 Hope that helps :)


3

lock locks an entire block. Since it's not followed by curly braces ({}), it locks an implicit block - the if statement. Here, the same logic applies - if executes a block if the condition is met. Since it is also not followed by curly braces, it implicitly has a block that contains a single statement. In other words, the given code is equivalent to: lock ...


0

It is locking the whole statement. Consider the following example: lock (LockObject) { if (instance == null) { } If it is only locking the if condition when using braces, then it will result to compiler error since it is not properly arranged/matched.


0

The if statement includes a statement for the "then" case. So the lock applies to both lines. A simple rule of thumb is: if there's a { it applies until the matching }, otherwise it applies until the first ;. That does not cover all situations, but certainly the most common ones.


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It's locking all of the code. Here { and } for if are just omitted.


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The get the password, the password itself had to be encrypted in first place (with yet another password, brr). And the rule #1 says: never ever encrypt passwords, use hashing algorithms with a salt to store them.


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let unfreeze; /** * Make a shallow copy of the object maintaining the prototype. * * @param {Object} source Frozen object. * @return {Object} */ unfreeze = (source) => { let property, target; target = {}; for (property in source) { if (source.hasOwnProperty(property)) { target[property] = source[property]; ...


0

According the MSDN documentation: The argument provided to the lock keyword ... is used to define the scope of the lock. ...Strictly speaking, the object provided is used solely to uniquely identify the resource being shared among multiple threads, so it can be an arbitrary class instance. In practice, however, this object usually represents the ...


0

ReentrantLock has an optional fairness parameter that can probably be used to implement your logic. However, depending on what those Strings are, where they come from and how you're using them there may be more suitable ways to handle concurrency (Guava's Striped comes to mind).


1

First, it should be noted that the example you have brought (based on your comment, it's page 208, listing 10.2) is a bad example - one that ends in a deadlock. The objects are not locked one after the other to prevent dynamic lock order deadlock, they are an example of where dynamic lock order will happen! Now, you are suggesting locking on this, but what ...


0

The basic fundamental here is to avoid race condition. In your case if there will be another method in any other class who is also doing transfer money to toAccount then incorrect amount may get update in the toAccount. e.g. There are 2 classes which performs money transfer. One class has a method: public void transferMoney(Account fromAccount,Account ...


2

Your alternative to the lock-ordering example is what you want to avoid: having a central lock that everything is using, because then you don't get concurrent transfers, everything waits for that one lock and only one transfer can proceed at a time. It's not clear what this is or what its scope can possibly be, but if there are multiple instances of this ...


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If your single producer is creating a brand new model, and assigning it to a shared field, then yes, Interlocked.Exchange is the way to go here. If your producer does not need to know what the old model was, then you could use Volatile.Write(ref _sharedObj, newObj) instead to keep it simpler. Just be aware of 3 things: Use Volatile.Read to read your ...


0

Yes, you are better off using Interlocked as it's more efficient since it's mostly translated into a single atomic operation. However, if you don't mind the clients still reading the old object for a bit you can even do without the Interlocked and just set a new instance. The client that happen to get the new instance will get the updated data and those ...


0

As far as i know you cannot lock the whole table with JPA. But of course you can use native queries to do that. Why don't you use a sequence like this in you entity: @Id @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.AUTO) private Long id; You would be able to work parallel instead of running one after the other. If you really insist on making in one after ...


0

sp_configure 'max degree of parallelism', 8 go reconfigure go


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A (pthread) mutex isn't explicitly bound to a particular variable, it's just a general locking mechanism. It's up to you to make sure every action on that variable is properly surrounded by locks and unlocks. Your program has a(n implicit) contract that only 1 thread may access dotstr.sum. The mutex helps you enforce it by making sure only 1 thread can ...


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There is an exclusive write lock on SAMPLEFILE.csv for the lifetime of the :main routine. The lock is released once the :main routine returns. You can extend the length of the lock by adding a command to delay the return. For example, timeout 60 /nobreak >nul would delay release of the lock by 1 minute. But I don't see how that does you any good. The ...


0

you need to specify that users data is unique to that user and the other users entry the same that way it will store both


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Of course the lock must be shared, otherwise there is no point in having a lock in the first place. If you are accessing an item for read and concurrently accessing it for a removal, things will not work out well.


4

The two operations should share the same lock. Otherwise, it would be possible to interleave a call to Add and another to Remove, which could lead to a corrupt hash set. Furthermore, even though Contains only reads the hashset but does not write to it, it also needs to do so inside a lock - otherwise it could risk reading a hash set that is currently being ...


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Bill Karwin answered this question through email.He said: The same transaction that holds an S lock can promote the lock to an X lock. This is not a conflict. The SELECT in session 1 with FOR UPDATE acquires an X lock. A simple SELECT query with no locking clause specified does not need to acquire an S lock. Any UPDATE or DELETE needs to acquire an X ...


0

You need to correct few threading issues in your code: You are wiring up events after starting threads. You should do this before starting threads. So, for both the classes, put whatever is in constructor in a Public instance function. Now create instances of your classes, wire up events and then call instance method of class B first and then class A to ...


0

I think that it would be better to either execute all the queries in a transaction or to use a stored proc which will be responsible to make all the select and update stuff and then return back to you the respective data from the last select statement. Having such a flow out of transaction, raises issues as the one you describe. You need to lock the row in ...


0

Do you have autocommit=1? Without transactional integrity, some other connection can slip in and change the row before you execute the SELECT. Note that there could be multiple NULL rows, so the UPDATE may be changing many rows. Did you check the "rows affected" after the UPDATE? Maybe no rows were changed.


1

LOCK TABLES is for MyISAM tables. If you are using InnoDB, switch to BEGIN...COMMIT and learn about "transactions" and don't use LOCK. When using LOCK TABLES, you get one chance to lock all the tables you need. In your example, the locks will be released on the 2 tables before acquiring the locks on the 3 tables. During that time, some other connection ...


2

There are several problems with this code: It is unlikely that you need both a ReentrantLock and synchronization. The getSize method is not synchronized at all. If, e.g., reset is called from a thread other than the one from which getSize is called, the program is incorrect. sendCmdMap is leaked in CommandTree's constructor. If the thread that creates ...


2

You can use blockingQueue to achieve the same. Refer simple tutorial about blockingQueue :http://tutorials.jenkov.com/java-util-concurrent/blockingqueue.html


3

Don't get headaches just for synchronizing a list, simply use the Java standard library : List<Command> commands = Collections.synchronizedList(new ArrayList<>()); By the way, a naive implementation of this would simply to wrap an unsafe list and add synchronized to all the methods.


0

I found a easy solution. The idea is simple. On shutdown the device password will be set to a master password. The normal user doesn't know the password. And on boot the password will be reset to teh users password, but the reset will not be executed in Safe Mode. So the safe mode is locked for normal users. I'm not sure if it's works for all devices, You ...


2

You can't do that currently. Using DevicePolicyManager.lockNow() to turn off the screen and lock the device crashes the GoogleTrustAgent. There is an open issue for this bug at the Android Open Source Project see Issue 79735. Hope it will be fixed soon.


1

Your code is a bit of a threading mess. Your first issue is a race condition if ItemFinished is raised before ProcessData() is finished. Don't worry about using AutoResetEvent. The simple thing is to lock every access to m_data. So that leads to the next quertion - yes, the lock is necessary and it's necessary everywhere. But your final point is the most ...


0

This might not be the complete answer you are looking for but there are some improvements to your code. Give the following a try: public function useResource() { $mysqli = secureMysqli(); // add `` backticks around table and column names to prevent mysql reserved words error if ($stmt = $mysqli->prepare("UPDATE `resource` SET `is_in_use` = 1 ...


0

Let's set the ground expectation about what battery resources are used for a REST grab. Battery cost to boot up the Radio chip - this is a huge power spike Battery cost to keep the transfer the data - this is a long-cost based upon the time taken to transfer data. For these two reasons, there's a lot of other suggestions to handle your implementation. ...


1

Postgres will only spot a deadlock if it can see two transactions waiting on each other. In particular for two (or more) processes the scenario must be: A needs to acquire a resource that is locked by B. B needs to acquire a resource that is locked by A. Deadlock handling will not deal with situations such as: A needs to acquire a resource that is ...


0

You can try to unlock them explicitly with unlock_tables command. More info is here: https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/lock-tables.html


-1

I needed to do this as a user was unable to rename a directory on windows 2008 r2 server, due to being in use - he said it wasnt, yet i could see open handles. Turns out he had attached a file from the directory in question to an email which had not been sent - so outlook was had the directory open...



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