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3

You should set StaticLogFileName to false, DatePattern to _yyyy-MM-dd.log and File to the path up to the date pattern, eg Path.Combine(FileDirectory,"Log_"): _roller.File = Path.Combine(FileDirectory,"Log_"); _roller.StaticLogFileName = false; _roller.DatePattern="_yyyy-MM-dd.log"


3

I guess you have changed StaticLogFileName to true: _roller.StaticLogFileName = true; When using a date rolling style it should be false: _roller.StaticLogFileName = false; [tips-on-using-log4net-rollingfileappender]


3

I've seen something similar before - it's due to the second being specified in the filename, and the writes are occuring during the end of one second and the start of another. <file type="log4net.Util.PatternString" value="C:\env\QA\Logs\consoleapp\log.%date{yyyy-MM-dd_HH-mm-ss}.txt"/> should be <file type="log4net.Util.PatternString" ...


2

We use Approach 1 in all of our solutions: public partial class Database { public Database(DbConnection connection) : base(connection, true) { CurrentUser = "SYSTEM"; } public string CurrentUser { get; set; } public override int SaveChanges() { var changeSet = ChangeTracker.Entries(); ...


2

I think this is wath you are looking for <log4net> <appender name="Common" type="log4net.Appender.ColoredConsoleAppender"> <filter type="log4net.Filter.LoggerMatchFilter"> <loggerToMatch value="Custom1" /> <acceptOnMatch value="false" /> </filter> <filter ...


2

Why do you think it would overwrite the error message of another thread? The logger should just append the messages, so there shouldn't be any overwriting (depends how you handle the logging though). There is a potential problem however - depending on your logging function you might be blocking access to the file. Because the method works on an external ...


2

try this log4net.GlobalContext.Properties["CustomColumn"] = DBNull.Value;


1

check out the MVC Ninject extension: https://github.com/ninject/ninject.web.mvc or from Nuget: http://www.nuget.org/packages/Ninject.MVC5/ Once you do this, your controllers will be activated via Ninject, meaning you can expose dependencies on their constructors (or properties, or methods) to request injections.


1

One of the great features of log4net is the ability to configure filtering and processing differently depending on the logger name: any solution that wraps the logger in a wrapper, singleton or static object loses that as all logs will use the same logger name - and the useful ability to immediately see what class a log entry came from. All you need in a ...


1

I usually use a wrapper class. Something like: public class Logger { private static readonly log4net.ILog _log = log4net.LogManager.GetLogger(typeof(Logger)); static Logger() { log4net.Config.XmlConfigurator.Configure(); } public void Error(string format, params object[] args) { _log.Error(string.Format(format, ...


1

I don't know about web.config, but if you add the below line into your appender for the log4net.config it should work. <threshold value="OFF"/> As long as the value is greater than the entry your sending, it won't show up in the log (i.e. value="WARN" won't log an entry for DEBUG/INFO.) Then you can change it to "OFF" to suppress any logging.


1

Call the base method RenderLoggingEvent to write your event according yo tour layout. For example here is the Append method in the TraceAppender // log4net.Appender.TraceAppender protected override void Append(LoggingEvent loggingEvent) { Trace.Write(base.RenderLoggingEvent(loggingEvent), this.m_category.Format(loggingEvent)); if ...


1

You can't, the console isn't attached to your test process so you can't write any messages in there.


1

You can try "Attach to Process" from the Debug menu to attach the debugger to already running programs. Or you can run DebugView from SysInternals: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896647


1

Like this: public static class LogConfigurator { public static void SetCommandText(string commandText) { Hierarchy logHierarchy = log4net.LogManager.GetRepository() as Hierarchy; if (logHierarchy == null) { throw new InvalidOperationException( "Can't set command ...


1

To send logs to a destination you need what log4net calls appenders. In your case all your needs are taken care of by the library out of the box AdoNetAppender: sends event logs to a database. You need to write the query and map the properties of your event to the parameters of the query: this is done in the configuration file. FileAppender: writes to file ...


1

As you can see in the page you linked to, here are the expected differences of all those contexts: The global context is shared by all threads in the current AppDomain. This context is thread safe for use by multiple threads concurrently. The thread context is visible only to the current managed thread. The logical thread context is visible to a logical ...


1

Looking at the source you can see that the AsyncForwardingAppender uses only one thread to dequeue the events. Using it won't kill your MVC app since only one thread will be used. Regarding "Fire and forget" as a bad pattern in web apps, you have to add a grain of salt to the statement since the answer talks about the danger of letting a functional ...


1

For an ASPNET MVC project adding log4net.Config.XmlConfigurator.Configure(); to the Global.asax.cs also helps: public class MvcApplication : System.Web.HttpApplication { protected void Application_Start() { AreaRegistration.RegisterAllAreas(); WebApiConfig.Register(GlobalConfiguration.Configuration); ...


1

It really depends on the actual implementation of the logger. Static classes are now frowned upon as they make unit testing more difficult. Many facilities which conventionally were implemented as static or singleton (loggers, e-mailers, etc.) now provide unit test/IoC friendly alternatives (e.g. a factory and an interface or virtual class). The design of ...


1

I just ran into this on one of our projects. This should fix it: https://github.com/apache/log4net/pull/12. The code basically obeys to the shallow-copy-on-write and immutable rules described by @StephenCleary and the accompanied test case withstands the Task.WhenAll scenario.


1

I think the best place to initialize per silo static variables is in Silo Bootstrap. Do note that Orleans has a logger configured and you can get it in grains by calling this.GetLogger(). <edit>One can define a logger inheriting from ILogConsumer and add it the collection of log sinks by calling ...


1

It works for me. I have exactly this scenario, a multi-threading application that must send different information to the log depends on the thread context. Using ThreadContext instead of GlobalContext works like a charm.



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