Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

32

A quick look at logger.rb reveals code such as the following: def write(message) @mutex.synchronize do if @shift_age and @dev.respond_to?(:stat) begin check_shift_log rescue raise Logger::ShiftingError.new("Shifting failed. #{$!}") end end @dev.write(message) end end So while I can't vouch for whether ...


30

Hehe ...The idea of Log4r comes from the famous "Log4j", which is my favorite logger in my java programming life. However log4r's doc is really poor, and it's really hard for newbies. Let me show my solution: Step1. create the log4r config file: (file name: config/log4r.yml) log4r_config: # define all loggers ... loggers: - name : ...


13

I'm the maintainer of log4r, For individual scripts (different .rb files), you could approach this in a few different ways (fitting, I know), first, be mindful that the features I'm covering here are available in >= 1.1.4. One way would be to set a different PatternFormatter string per script (if you create a yaml or xml configuration file, you can specify ...


11

Hmm, any reason why you don't instantiate Log4r::Logger class at the beginning of your script and pass the instance around? You don't even have to pass it around, you can always get it by name from Logger class: run.rb: require 'log4r' require 'class_a' logger = Log4r::Logger.new('test') logger.outputters << Log4r::Outputter.stdout logger.outputters ...


8

I was running into the same problem, so I created an initializer to extend log4r with an empty formatter method. Just create a file named log_formatting.rb in initializers and paste the following into it: class Log4r::Logger def formatter() end end This worked for me. I hope it helps.


8

Kind of lame answering my own question, but I found answer to this and adding it for later searches. For some reason I need to require log4r/outputter/syslogoutputter explicitly other wise SyslogOutputter would cause "uninitialized constant SyslogOutputter (NameError)" error. Other outputters do not seem to have this problem. require 'rubygems' require ...


7

Using the contexts is preferable, but you can use your own formatter (see Log4r formatters) logger = Logger.new 'test' outputter = Outputter.stdout outputter.formatter = PatternFormatter.new(:pattern => "%l - kittens - %m") logger.outputters = outputter logger.info 'adorable' # => INFO - kittens - adorable Or, actually, because you want it to ...


7

This is a little weird. You need to create a logger instance, before you can access the log level constants. Here is how it looks on irb: >> require "log4r" => true >> Log4r::DEBUG NameError: uninitialized constant Log4r::DEBUG from (irb):2 >> Log4r::Logger.root => #<Log4r::RootLogger:0x101737948 @outputters=[], @level=0> ...


4

The method formatter is not defined on Log4r::Logger, but on Log4r::FileOutputter. therefore I am surprised that is worked before the update of Rails. Perhaps that changed between different versions of Log4r. Please try the following (adjust the filenames and patters): require 'log4r' outputter = Log4r::FileOutputter.new('log4r', :filename => ...


3

To mimic rails logging behavior (logging into environment dependend logfiles) I use the following log4r.yml: log4r_config: # define all loggers ... loggers: - name : production level : WARN trace : 'false' outputters : - datefile_production - name : development level : DEBUG trace : 'true' ...


2

I agree that the log4r documentation is pretty poor. We are using it though and it serves us pretty well, in let's-say an enterprisey app. We are not using logger inheritance so I can't help you with it, and also I don't know about any alternative software, but: Here's the code we use to read YAML configuration (in fact, I think we pass it as already ...


2

These constants don't seem to exist anymore. What I found was this though: >> Log4r::Log4rConfig.const_get :LogLevels #=> ["DEBUG", "INFO", "WARN", "ERROR", "FATAL"] Maybe have a look at their examples (e.g. require and include Log4r): http://log4r.rubyforge.org/manual.html#outofbox


2

Write a middleware that replaces env['rack.errors'] and env['rack.logger'].


2

pls look at following threads Rails Logging API logging in rails app What's a good logging replacement for rails? HTH sameera


2

Your error is in this line: require 'log4r', :version=>'=1.1.10' I'm not sure what you tried to do, but require receives a single argument. The error wrong number of arguments means that you are trying to call a method with an unexpected number of arguments. (2 for 1) means you are trying to call a method with one argument with two. The only method ...


2

From the code sample in the manual: require 'log4r' include Log4r # create a logger named 'mylog' that logs to stdout mylog = Logger.new 'mylog' mylog.outputters = Outputter.stdout What you seem to be missing, in order to be able to use Logger, is to add below your require an include clause: require 'log4r' include Log4r Alternatively you can call ...


2

Get rid of the logfile statement. bundle exec sidekiq | tee ./log/sidekiq.log


1

I guess you mentioned the same in config file. outputters: - type : StderrOutputter name : stderr level : ERROR only_at : - ERROR - FATAL - type : StdoutOutputter name : stdout level : INFO only_at : ...


1

I had this same problem and was able to solve it by putting the following code at the top of my application.rb, after my Bundler.require statement: require 'log4r' require 'log4r/yamlconfigurator' require "#{Rails.root}/lib/rollable_file_outputter.rb" include Log4r Then, at the bottom on the Application class block, add this and with dynamic loggers: # ...


1

You can now update to delayed_jobs 4.0.1 gem and this will solve this issue !


1

I found that the log4r file lib/log4r.rb to be missing the line require "log4r/outputter/emailoutputter". Adding this missing require to my Rails application in a config/initializer file allowed the EmailOutputter class available.


1

Your problem with Log4r::Logger.root is version depending (the actual version 1.1.11 has this problem). You may use the previous log4r-version 1.1.10: gem 'log4r', '<=1.1.10' #or '= 1.1.10' require 'log4r' Log4r::Logger.root log4r defines the constants like Log4r::DEBUG with the creation of the first logger. You need a Log4r::Logger.new('dummy') ...


1

ruby is single-threaded, so I assume you are running your rails app on a server like unicorn? The only solution I can think of is timestamps (with micro seconds) and not using the multi-line Rails log output which is not suitable for anything but single requests in dev environments. But even this does not guarantee "ordered" logs because they can be written ...


1

Looking at this post [1] you might have to import the FileOutputter as well. Not really sure. I think it's an import issue when the other server works fine. Just try to import everything you might possibly use from Log4r and make sure you don't call in [1] mentioned functions directly on the logger somewhere else. If that does not work, try setting up a ...


1

Can anyone point me to a working code snippet that will allow log configuration using a YAML file, and initialization at runtime? I wrote a detailed blogpost about how to set up log4r in a way that it replaces the standard rails logger. Furthermore I went into detail about how to use multiple loggers, use log levels as well as how to log Mongoid, ...


1

found the problem. you now need to set it via config.log_level https://github.com/rails/rails/blob/master/railties/lib/rails/application/bootstrap.rb


1

I think this might be what you're looking for.. Use this within the worker itself, and create a custom named log file require 'log4r' logger = Log4r::Logger.new('test') logger.outputters << Log4r::Outputter.stdout logger.outputters << Log4r::FileOutputter.new('logtest', :filename => 'logtest.log') logger.info('started script') ## You're ...


1

I noticed that your "error_config.yml" file defines the output level as "debug". loggers: - name : mylogger level : DEBUG maybe you want it to be "WARN" ? loggers: - name : mylogger level : WARN p.s. ^_^ naming convension is important. please be friendly to the readers of your code. (usually is yourself). which is more ...


1

It should be like this: config/logging.rb require 'logging' # Logging.init is required to avoid # unknown level was given 'info' (ArgumentError) # or # uninitialized constant Logging::MAX_LEVEL_LENGTH (NameError) # when an Appender or Layout is created BEFORE any Logger is instantiated: Logging.init :debug, :info, :warn, :error, :fatal layout = ...


1

After posting my answer using extend, (see "EDIT", below), I thought I'd try using set_trace_func to keep a sort of stack trace like in the discussion I posted to. Here is my final solution; the set_trace_proc call would be put in an initializer or similar. #!/usr/bin/env ruby # Keep track of the classes that invoke each "call" event # and the method they ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible