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1

You have a few problems with your code: I think you are mis-subsetting your code when assigning to xx and yy. I think your y-axis is based on $SAMPLES[12] and your x-axis on $YEAR[12], but you are assigning $YEAR1 and $SAMPLE1 to xx, and similarly to yy. Fix the column references and your data will likely be ordered/ranged correctly. The use of apply ...


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You have over-complicated the issue. You have already turned the logarithmic problem into a linear one by defining a variable update rate rather than a variable PWM step - so you have essentially solved the problem, but not seen the simple arithmetic relationship. If you take the OCR0A vs delay points you have selected (25,30), (50,25), (128,17), it can ...


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It sounds like you really want to use some linear function of a logarithm, but without the overhead of the floating point math library. A crude fixed point logarithm can be coded as uint_8 log2fix(uint_8 in) { if(in == 0) return 0; uint_8 out = 0; while(in > 0) { in = in >> 1; out++; } return out ...


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The posted transfer function is quite linear. Suggest a linear delay calculation. delay = 32 - OCR0A/8; After accept edit Various look-up-tables lend themselves to a close fit simple equations (constructed to avoid intermediate values > 65535) such as BRIGHTNESS_60 = (((index*index)>>2 + 128)*index)>>8;


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The scaling isn't quite logarithmic so simply using log() isn't enough. I have tackled this problem in the past by using a LUT with 18 entries and going an entire step at a time (i.e. the control variable varies from 0 to 17 and then is shoved through the LUT), but if finer control is required then having 52 or more is certainly doable. Make sure to put it ...


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Postgres provides two variants of log(): Per documentation: log(dp or numeric) log(b numeric, x numeric) The variant with two parameters calculates a logarithm to base b. Note that: It requires numeric input for both parameters The 1st parameter is the base. A correct expression would be: ceil(log(2.0, end_value::numeric / start_value::numeric)) AS ...


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Try below SQL : select id, start_value, end_value, floor(log(end_value / start_value,2)/2) from TempTable Hope this Helps :)


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Divide the end value by the start value to get the factor between them. For example 130/40 = 3.25. Doubling the value once gives a factor 2, and doubling it twice gives a factor 4, and so on. You can use the logarithm for base 2 to calculate how many times you need to double the value to get a specific factor. log2(3.25) = 1.7004397... Then you round that ...


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You want logarithms for this. Specifically, the exact number of times is the log-of-base-2 of the ratio of the two values. You want the next higher integer, so you want to round this up. In Postgres: ceiling(log(2, end_value / start_value))


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What about using stem(PeakCount1(:,2),PeakCount1(:,1),'LineWidth',10.0); set(gca,'XScale','log'); Instead using stem you can use any plot function you like, just insert the second line to make the x axis log.



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