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0

You can do away with all those if else statements. In effect you are only evaluating four logical expressions and selecting indices based on that. You can use the following ab = [a-1, b; a+1, b; a, b+1; a, b-1]; abIn = [a ~= 1; a ~= L; b ~= L; b ~= 1]; adjacent = zeros(1, 5); adjacent(abIn) = lattice(sub2ind([L, L], ab(abIn, 1), ab(abIn, 2))); adjacent(5) = ...


0

If i understand this correct, you want the values in $msaArray, where $billingList contains customerIDs which are present in $msaClients but their corresponding Accounted time should not be eual to $idzero( 0 in this case) PS C:\> $msaArray = ($billingList | where {(($msaclients -contains $_.customerid)) -and ($_.'accounted time' -ne $idzero)}) PS ...


1

I guess that by "is more relevant" you mean what other people would phrase as "binds more tightly" or "has higher precedence". In XQuery, a and b or c is parsed as (a and b) or c, not as a and (b or c). This may be seen in productions 46 and 47 of the XQuery grammar: [46] OrExpr ::= AndExpr ( "or" AndExpr )* [47] AndExpr ::= ComparisonExpr ( "and" ...


0

Because the return type of operators || and && is not the same as type of their left argument. The return type of || and && is always int1, while the left argument may be any integral, floating point or pointer type. The operands also don't have to be of the same type. Therefore defining x ||= y as x = x || y and x &&= y as x = x ...


1

Try this. There were a few issues with the abs(R(i,i)-R(i-1,i-1)) condition for the while loop. function [R] = romberg(f,a,b,delta,nmax) R=zeros(nmax,nmax); R(1,1)=(f(a)+f(b))*(b-a)/2; i=2; E=2*delta; while i<nmax && E>delta m=2^(i-1); R(i,1)=trapez(f,a,b,m); for j=2:i ...


1

The IO action liftM2 f action1 action2 runs both actions for any binary function f is (e.g., (&&) in your case). If you want to just run action1 you can code it as follows: --| Short-circuit && sAnd :: IO Bool -> IO Bool -> IO Bool sAnd action1 action2 = do b <- action1 if b then action2 else return False Use it as sAnd ...


4

I think using && for conditional execution is something of a bad habit. Sure it's just a matter of reason to do this for side-effect-free stuff like the False && all (/=0) [1..], but when there are side-effects it's quite confusionsome to make them dependent in such a hidden way. (Because the practise is so widespread, most programmers will ...


2

You say that you want to run commands in parallel and run "bar" only if "foo" succeeds. It makes no sense. You have to decide, if you want to run it in parallel or sequential. If you want run "bar" only if "foo" succeed, try: import System.Process main = do callCommand "foo" callCommand "bar" Or if you want to run it in parallel, try: import ...


0

You don't state this in your question, so I assume that you're not getting any results back from the query as it is? Probably there are simply no Tweets with IDs strictly greater and strictly smaller than the range you're providing where the TweetText matches. You could debug to see what the values for StartPoint and EndPoint are and if there really is an ...


0

If you get more than 1 entry from the query in SSMS, you might want to look into the criteria - why is it returning more than one entry. Tighten the where clause, make it precise. where @VsTweetText = TweetText and ID < @VsEndPoint and ID > @VsStartPoint But if you want to get only first entry (if you do), then use this: select top 1 ID ...


1

empty() already checks for empty string "" so it's shorter: if(!empty($Options_arr[0]) || !empty($MoreOptions_arr[0]) || !empty($Special_arr[0])) { //some HTML here }


0

BragG, you can use elseif Like: if((!empty($Options_arr[0]) && $Options_arr[0]!="") || (!empty($MoreOptions_arr[0]) && $MoreOptions_arr[0]!="") || (!empty($Special_arr[0]) && $Special_arr[0]!="")) { // some html or any code } I hope that is what you were looking for.. Feel free to ask any question.


0

You're basically already there... if ( (!empty($Options_arr[0]) && $Options_arr[0]!="") || (!empty($MoreOptions_arr[0]) && $MoreOptions_arr[0]!="") || (!empty($Special_arr[0]) && $Special_arr[0]!="") ){ ...do something Basically you write an if statement that resolves if any of the sub-statements are true by joining ...


0

You are just missing some brackets. Also || is more frequently used than OR if((!empty($Options_arr[0]) && $Options_arr[0]!="") || (!empty($MoreOptions_arr[0]) && $MoreOptions_arr[0]!="") || (!empty($Special_arr[0]) && $Special_arr[0]!="")){ echo '<p>hello</p>'; }


3

You're facing this issue becuase you're not check value returned from store_user method, but user[:user_uid] value (exactly as @Neil Slater said). So, if you use ||, user[:user_uid] remains nil. But if you use ||=, user[:user_uid] is set to value returned by next_uid method.


1

Change your define's to bitmasks: // using binary literal notation requires PHP 5.4 define("LOAD_JS", 0b00000001); define("LOAD_KEEN", 0b00000010); define("ALLOW_ROBOTS", 0b00000100); define("GENERATE_CSRF", 0b00001000); Call your function as follows: $flags = LOAD_JS | LOAD_KEEN | ALLOW_ROBOTS | GENERATE_CSRF; render(array("foo"), $flags); Inside your ...


3

Also: aggregate(var ~ group, data=df, FUN=mean) library(plyr) ddply(df, .(group), summarize, mean=mean(var)) ### add column with mean of each group cbind(df, with(df, ave(var, group))) Careful that calling something df overwrites the F Distribution in package:stats which is loaded by default.


3

An even slicker approach would be using the dplyr() package. library(dplyr) summarise(group_by(df, group), meanValue = mean(var))


1

I think you have a typo in your original function definition. That's probably causing your error- try this? autoMean <- function (df, q) { mean(df$var[df$group==q]) return(data.frame(q = q, mean= mean(df$var[df$group==q]) )) } groups<-c("A","B") results <- lapply(groups, autoMean, df = df)


3

Maybe you are looking for tapply: tapply(X=df$var, INDEX=df$group, FUN=mean) # A B # 1 4


2

See N3797 1.9/15 Except where noted, evaluations of operands of individual operators and of subexpressions of individual expressions are unsequenced. 5.14/2: (the && operator) 5.15/2: (the || operator) If the second expression is evaluated, every value computation and side effect associated with the first expression is sequenced ...


1

There's a common confusion here. Just because || and && are sequencing points does not imply that the runtime evaluates r in the order you think. It could evaluate r = n - 1, r = n + 1 etc. before any of the if expressions are evaluated in any order it fancies; i.e. is unsequenced. That is what the compiler warning is highlighting to you. By the ...


1

You can do this two ways: Inverse region in-place and reset by re-drawing image Keep an inverted version of image in a second canvas and draw clipped version Option 1 For option 1 you would need to iterate the area each time using JavaScript which will be a relative slow operation compared to option 2. Example of option 1: // inside the mouse move ...


1

You can optimize your "inverted stroke" to be fast enough for "live" strokes. Layer 2 canvases, one on top of another. Draw the inverted image on the bottom canvas. Draw the normal image on the top canvas. Draw your strokes on the top canvas with context.globalCompositeOperation="destination-out". "destination-out" compositing causes the top canvas ...


2

This works whether mm is a matrix, vector or data.frame. See ?max.col for more info: max.col(cbind(!is.na(rbind(NA, mm)), TRUE), ties = "first")[-1] - 1


1

For part (a) of your question this is the simplest function I could think of: leadingNaCount = function(x) { sum(cumprod(is.na(x))) }


0

All the acrobatics with vectors of indices are unnecessary. Logical indexing, subsetting are really all you need, using a new 'country' field (factor) you add to your data. (Maybe also plyr::ddply if you get real fancy) All you want to do is allow the user to: Choose a country from a list (by selecting its number, 2-letter abbrev, whatever)... ... then ...


0

Additional details based on what I have found here and there as I was looking for an implication operator : you can use a clever hack to define your own operators. Here is a running example annotated with sources leading me to this result. #!/usr/bin/python # From http://code.activestate.com/recipes/384122/ (via ...


1

Perl operators such as ! that return boolean values return a special value for false: it is "" when used in string context and 0 when used in numeric context. So when you print it, it is "", not "0". But if you try to use it as a number, it doesn't give a warning the way "" does. Compare: perl -wle'$false = !1; print "string: ", $false, " number: ", ...


2

In perlsyn, under Truth and Falsehood you read The number 0, the strings '0' and "" , the empty list () , and undef are all false in a boolean context. All other values are true. Negation of a true value by ! or not returns a special false value. When evaluated as a string it is treated as "" , but as a number, it is treated as 0. Most Perl operators ...


2

!$b evaluates to empty string '', as false values are not represented by zero when stringified by print(), "$bool", or some other string operation. $a=""; $b="n"; $c = !$a; $d = !$b; print $c , "\n" , $d; if($d == 0){ print "zero"; } use Data::Dumper; print Dumper { '$a' => $a, '$b' => $b, '$c' => $c, '$d' => $d, '$d == 0' => ...


5

Variables in Perl are treated as either numbers or strings depending on the context. If you haven't treated something as a number when assigning to it, Perl will treat it like a string when you print it. Because of this, false values are a bit different in Perl than in languages with stronger typing (emphasis added by me): The number 0, the strings ...


1

Arithmetic operators Concatenation operator Comparison conditions IS [NOT] NULL, LIKE, [NOT] IN [NOT] BETWEEN Not equal to NOT logical condition AND logical condition OR logical condition You can use parentheses to override rules of precedence.


3

ifelse does exactly what you want: > ifelse(is.na(x[,2]), x[,1], x[,2]) [1] 12 25 If speed is paramount (and you don't want to mess with C), you can try: y <- x[,2] y[is.na(y)] <- x[is.na(y), 1] This effectively shortcircuits some of the overhead of ifelse. Consider: set.seed(1) x <- cbind(sample(1:1e5), sample(c(1:95000, rep(NA, 5000)))) ...


0

There is no "other solution". If you put || then both errors will be added if only one field is empty. If you put && then both errors will be added when both fields are emtpy, but if only one is empty then nothing's gonna be added (which is also not what you want). Only solution is what peter.petrov suggested


0

I found the solution even if it's not totaly logical its works: (just adding the AND) if(StringUtils.isBlank(getCode()) && StringUtils.isBlank(getNewCode())){ errors.add("code", new ActionMessage("error.codeMode.required")); errors.add("codeNew", new ActionMessage("error.codeMode.required")); } and the second one for ...


1

Not familiar with this technology but from logical standpoint this makes more sense to me. if(StringUtils.isBlank(getCode())){ errors.add("code", new ActionMessage("error.codeMode.required")); } if(StringUtils.isBlank(getNewCode())){ errors.add("codeNew", new ActionMessage("error.codeMode.required")); } Not sure if that's what you need, just ...


11

There is no such operator, because it will be ill-defined if it exists: so, let a = 0, c = 0 we have a & 0 = c a & 1 = c then, we should have c ?? a = 0 and c ?? a = 1 , but an operator/function cannot return two values given the same input/parameters.


13

It's impossible. This is because a & b is a lossy transformation. You don't know whether any dropped 1 bits were part of a or b.


7

You can't. 0 && 0 == 0 1 && 0 == 0 To reverse this, you'd need an operator that gives back both 0 and 1. (But if b == 1 you do of course know that a == c.)


0

First off, match literally matches the entire string to see if it matches the expression, which it clearly does not. Lastly, if you are trying to parse the entire input expression as such, it should be parsed into an abstract syntax tree - a stack will probably not represent the intended expression unless you ignore order of operations or have some other ...


2

To solve your problem this would work - all(A,2) If you were looking to set elements based on the columnwise data in A, you would do this - all(A,1) More info on all, must serve you well.



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