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4

SELinux was restricting the access to logrotate on log files in directories which does not have the required SELinux file context type. "/var/log" directory has "var_log_t" file context, and logrotate was able to do the needful. So the solution was to set this on my application log files and it's parent directory: semanage fcontext -a -t var_log_t ...


4

When the log file is rotated, it is being renamed. The fs.watch function in node.js has the ability to notify you when the file changes. http://www.nodejs.org/api/fs.html#fs_fs_watch_filename_options_listener Try something like: fs.watch('filetowatch', function (event) { if (event === 'rename') { // close the file descriptor you are reading from ...


2

Even if the application opens the file as a shared object Python can't so they can't get along by the looks of it. It's not so bad :). You can (have to) open a file using CreateFile as pointed out by Augusto. You can use standard ctypes module for this. In the question Using a struct as a function argument with the python ctypes module you can see how ...


2

Do you have any control over the application generating the logfile? Because depending on the way the file is open by that application, you really can't modify it. This link may seem off-topic here, but deep in Windows, what determines the file access to other application is the dwShareMode parameter of the CreateFile function: ...


2

You could do something like this. files: "/opt/elasticbeanstalk/tasks/systemtaillogs.d/webapp.conf": mode: "000755" owner: root group: root content: | /var/app/support/logs/*.log /var/log/httpd/error_log /var/log/httpd/access_log /var/log/messages /var/app/current/code-igniter/application/logs/*log ...


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When the logrotate utility runs postrotate (or prerotate) scripts, it checks the error code returned by the script. In particular, when sharedscripts is specified, the error handling is as follows (quoted from man logrotate, emphasis added): sharedscripts Normally, prerotate and postrotate scripts are run for each log which is rotated and the ...


2

I finally figured out how to solve the problem. This was because the log file was being written by pm2. logrotate changed its name to my_app.log.1 and created new my_app.log file, but pm2 did not care about this and kept writing to my_app.log.1. I solved the problem by replacing the notifempty option by copytruncate and then restarted pm2. After fixing, ...


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Something like this in /etc/cron.d/rotate_tomcat_logs: # delete every log file over 100 days old, and compress every log file over 1 day old. 00 1 * * * root ( find /opt/tomcat/logs -name \*log\* -name \*.gz -mtime +100 -exec rm -f {} \; >/dev/null 2>&1 ) 05 1 * * * root ( find /opt/tomcat/logs -name \*log\* ! -name \*.gz -mtime +1 -exec gzip {} ...


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I don't think having a large log file will cause a performance hit to apache. It uses handlers that simply append messages to the end of the file. The thing you do want to look out for, however, is your partition becoming full. If you really needed to, you could create a special cron task to run logrotate against your apache2 logrotate configuration a few ...


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Yes of course this will work. Use a config like this: /path/to/YOURLOGFILE { monthly rotate 12 compress ... more settings } into /etc/logrotate.d/your-service. Even the man page provides an example, it shows how to rotate /var/log/messages


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Having done this for multiple customers for many years, the favored approach has been to use TimeBasedRollingPolicy, rolling daily (can set to any frequency) and setting MaxHistory to desired number of days (often has been 30). While I like and use logrotate for other log files, Logback's built in rolling means logrotate has not been necessary for my ...


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Your options are: As Satish answered, put a find script in cron You could even, use logrotate and put a find script in the postrotate command (ick) Use the following logrotate config, the benefit being all log handling is in a single system I think your logrotate config should work, may it is this part that is not working correctly: dateext ...


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I'm not sure what the correct way is because earlier today I've come across this question only because I was looking for the same answer. I think this approach would work, however it has two relatively minor problems (if you can even call them that): There is a race condition window where log data might get lost between the time logrotate makes a copy of ...


1

weekly in your /etc/logrotate.conf means all your log files will be rotated weekly, if this option is not overridden locally. The manual says: Each configuration file can set global options (local definitions over- ride global ones, and later definitions override earlier ones) and specify logfiles to rotate. If the size option is used, logrotate ...



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