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203

Use a non-consuming regular expression. The typical (i.e. Perl/Java) notation is: (?=expr) This means "match expr but after that continue matching at the original match-point." You can do as many of these as you want, and this will be an "and." Example: (?=match this expression)(?=match this too)(?=oh, and this) You can even add capture groups ...


180

You need to use lookahead as some of the other responders have said, but the lookahead has to account for other characters between its target word and the current match position. For example: (?=.*word1)(?=.*word2)(?=.*word3) The .* in the first lookahead lets it match however many characters it needs to before it gets to "word1". Then the match ...


58

A negative lookahead says, at this position, the following regex can not match. Let's take a simplified example: a(?!b(?!c)) a Match: (?!b) succeeds ac Match: (?!b) succeeds ab No match: (?!b(?!c)) fails abe No match: (?!b(?!c)) fails abc Match: (?!b(?!c)) succeeds The last example is a double negation: it allows a b followed by c. ...


40

You can use negative lookaheads: ^(?!.*\.\.).*$ That causes the expression to not match if it can find a sequence of two periods anywhere in the string.


29

String.split accepts either a string or regular expression as its first parameter. The String.match method only accepts a regular expression. I'd imagine that String.match will try and work with whatever is passed; so if you pass a string it will interpret it as a regular expression. The String.split method doesn't have the luxury of doing this because it ...


25

The answer to the question you ask, which is whether a larger class of languages than the regular languages can be recognised with regular expressions augmented by lookaround, is no. A proof is relatively straightforward, but an algorithm to translate a regular expression containing lookarounds into one without is messy. First: note that you can always ...


25

They are called lookarounds; they allow you to assert if a pattern matches or not, without actually making the match. There are 4 basic lookarounds: Positive lookarounds: see if we CAN match the pattern... (?=pattern) - ... to the right of current position (look ahead) (?<=pattern) - ... to the left of current position (look behind) Negative ...


18

Pretty good answers there, but my favorite approach would be to use itertools.tee -- given an iterator, it returns two (or more if requested) that can be advanced independently. It buffers in memory just as much as needed (i.e., not much, if the iterators don't get very "out of step" from each other). E.g.: import itertools import collections class ...


17

The lookaheads used in an LR(1) parser are computed as follows. First, the start state has an item of the form S -> .w ($) for every production S -> w, where S is the start symbol. Here, the $ marker denotes the end of the input. Next, for any state that contains an item of the form A -> x.By (t), where x is an arbitrary string of terminals and ...


16

You can do that with a regular expression but probably you'll want to some else. For example use several regexp and combine them in a if clause. You can enumerate all possible permutations with a standard regexp, like this (matches a, b and c in any order): (abc)|(bca)|(acb)|(bac)|(cab)|(cba) However, this makes a very long and probably inefficient ...


15

Look at this example: We have 2 regexps A and B and we want to match both of them, so in pseudo-code it looks like this: pattern = "/A AND B/" It can be written without using the AND operator like this: pattern = "/NOT (NOT A OR NOT B)/" in PCRE: "/^(^A|^B)/" regexp_match(pattern,data)


13

You can write a wrapper that buffers some number of items from the generator, and provides a lookahead() function to peek at those buffered items: class Lookahead: def __init__(self, iter): self.iter = iter self.buffer = [] def __iter__(self): return self def next(self): if self.buffer: return self....


13

Use lookahead assertions: ^(?=.*advancebrain)(?=.*com_ixxochart)(?=.*p=completed) will match if all three terms are present. You might want to add \b work boundaries around your search terms to ensure that they are matched as complete words and not substrings of other words (like advancebraindeath) if you need to avoid this: ^(?=.*\badvancebrain\b)(?=.*\...


11


11

Lookarounds can be nested. So this regex matches "drupal-6.14/" that is not followed by "sites" that is not followed by "/all" or "/default". Confusing? Using different words, we can say it matches "drupal-6.14/" that is not followed by "sites" unless that is further followed by "/all" or "/default"


10

Personally, I'd do this as two separate regex just to make it clearer. while (<FILE>) { next if /^SKIPPING/; next if !/too long/; ... do stuff }


10

You could use a look-ahead assertion that excludes the occurrence of dog between dog and lab: /dog(?:(?!dog).)*?lab/


10

For manipulating CSV data I'd reccomend using Text::CSV - there's a lot of potential complexity within CSV data, which while possible to contruct code to handle yourself, isn't worth the effort when there's a tried and tested CPAN module to do it for you


9

I agree with the other posts that lookaround is regular (meaning that it does not add any fundamental capability to regular expressions), but I have an argument for it that is simpler IMO than the other ones I have seen. I will show that lookaround is regular by providing a DFA construction. A language is regular if and only if it has a DFA that recognizes ...


9

To find an unescaped character, you would look for a character that is preceded by an even number of (or zero) escape characters. This is relatively straight-forward. (?<=(?<!\\)(?:\\\\)*)\* # this is explained in Tim Pietzcker' answer Unfortunately, many regex engines do not support variable-length look-behind, so we have to substitute with ...


9

Actually, all this can be simplified a lot: ^[A-Z][A-Z ]{0,13}[A-Z]$ does exactly what you want. Or at least what your current regex does (plus the length restriction). This especially avoids problems with catastrophic backtracking which you're setting yourself up for when nesting quantifiers like that. Case in point: Try the string ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOP ...


8

I think what you want is positive lookahead, not negative, so that you find the key-colon combo ahead of the current position, but you don't consume it. This appears to work for your test example: ([\w]{2})\:(.+?)(?=[\w]{2}\:|$) Yielding: LN: SMITHbbbbbbbb FN: SAMANTHAbb BD: 19400515 PD: 1 BN: 123456 PN: 9876543210 ... Note: I added the colons in my ...


8

You can use a negative lookahead: /::(?!.*::)(.*)$/ The result will then be in the capture. Another approach: /^.*::(.*)$/ This should work because the .* matches greedily, so the :: will match the last occurence of that string.


8

in php: <?php $in = "\"Bob\",\"1\",\"Mary\",\"2\""; $out = preg_replace('/"(\d)"/',"$1",$in); echo $out; ?> in javascript: var $in = "\"Bob\",\"1\",\"Mary\",\"2\""; var $out = $in.replace(/"(\d)"/g,"$1"); alert($out); my best guess in R: (I am not an R programmer) in <- "\"Bob\",\"1\",\"Mary\",\"2\"" out <- sub("\"([:digit:])\"","\\1",in) ...


8

The Forth approach is to add a separate loop stack alongside the data stack. You then define operations that work with this loop stack. For example: 5 0 DO I . LOOP Will print 0 1 2 3 4 The way this works is: DO moves the index (0) and the control (5) over to the loop stack. I copies the top of the loop stack to the data stack. LOOP increments the ...


8

Ok, since Tim decided to not update his regex with my suggested mods (and Tomalak's answer is not as streamlined), here is my recommended solution: Replace: ((?<!\\)(?:\\\\)*)\* with $1% Here it is in the form of a commented PHP snippett: // Replace all non-escaped asterisks with "%". $re = '% # Match non-escaped asterisks. ( ...


7

The two byte-stream based classes java.io.BufferedInputStream and java.io.PushbackInputStream have their character-stream based counterparts in the same package: java.io.PushbackReader java.io.BufferedReader


7

Try this: \B[a-z] \B is the opposite of \b - it matches where there is no word boundary - when we see a letter that is after another letter. Your regex is replacing the whole tail of the word - [a-z]+, with a single asterisks. You should replace them one by one. If you want it to work, you should match a single letter, but check is has a word behind it (...



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