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20

Why not use everything C# has to offer? The following use of anonymous types, collection initializers, implicitly typed variables, and lambda-syntax LINQ is compact, intuitive, and maintains your modified requirement that patterns be evaluated in order: var providerMap = new[] { new { Pattern = "SWGAS.COM" , Name = "Southwest Gas" }, new { ...


15

Since you seem to need to search for the key before returning the value a Dictionary is the right way to go, but you will need to loop over it. // dictionary to hold mappings Dictionary<string, string> mapping = new Dictionary<string, string>(); // add your mappings here // loop over the keys foreach (KeyValuePair<string, string> item in ...


13

The first point to make about PTX is that it is only an intermediate representation of the code run on the GPU -- a virtual machine assembly language. PTX is assembled to target machine code either by ptxas at compile time, or by the driver at runtime. So when you are looking at PTX, you are looking at what the compiler emitted, but not at what the GPU will ...


12

You can use templates to unroll. See the disassembly for the sample Live on Godbolt But -funroll-loops has the same effect for this sample. Live On Coliru template <unsigned N> struct faux_unroll { template <typename F> static void call(F const& f) { f(); faux_unroll<N-1>::call(f); } }; template <> ...


10

One more using LINQ and Dictionary var mapping = new Dictionary<string, string>() { { "SWGAS.COM", "Southwest Gas" }, { "georgiapower.com", "Georgia Power" } . . }; return mapping.Where(pair ...


8

When a compiler performs a loop unroll optimization, how does it determined by which factor to unroll the loop or weather to unroll the whole loop or not. stack consumption and locality. instruction counts. ability to make/propagate optimizations based on the unrolled and inlined program. whether the loop size is fixed, or expected to be in a certain ...


8

You're running out of registers because your block_size (512) is too large. ptxas reports that your kernel uses 16 registers with the commented lines: $ nvcc test.cu -Xptxas --verbose ptxas info : Compiling entry function '_Z13kmeans_kernelPfS_PiS_ii' for 'sm_10' ptxas info : Used 16 registers, 24+16 bytes smem, 65536 bytes cmem[0] Uncommenting the ...


7

To avoid the blatant Schlemiel the Painter's approach that looping over all the keys would involve: let's use regular expressions! // a dictionary that holds which bill text keyword maps to which provider static Dictionary<string, string> BillTextToProvider = new Dictionary<string, string> { {"SWGAS.COM", "Southwest Gas"}, ...


7

Using the || means that as soon as one is true, the rest of the conditions are not computed. This would be equivalent to the loop: for (int j = 2; j <= 20; j++) { if ( i % j != 0){ isDivisible = false; break; } } If you try this you may find the gap in running times has been narrowed. Any other ...


6

If the JVM unrolls the loop is probably best answered by actually printing the generated assembly. Note that this requires your code to actually be executed as a hot spot (i.e. the JVM considers it worthy of the expensive optimizations). Why the JVM decides one way or another is a much harder question and probably requires in-depth analysis of the JIT code. ...


6

It's not documented, but it should actually work with #pragma unroll. Can you check the compiler log to see if the unroll is applied? I'm not sure if the kernel analyzer uses the same compiler as the OpenCL runtime, you might want to check. Otherwise, if you know that n comes in chunks of 256, you can unroll manually by having one loop over blocks of 256 ...


6

I would propose that whether or not the compiler CAN unroll the loop, with modern pipelined architectures and caches, unless your "do stuff" is trivial, there is little benefit in doing so, and in many cases doing so would be a performance HIT instead of a boon. If your "do stuff" is nontrivial, unrolling the loop will create multiple copies of this ...


6

Here's how you'd use a pointer to member function: void (A::*fun)(int); if(j == 1) fun = &A::fun_b; else if(j == 2) fun = &A::fun_c; else if(j == 3) fun = &A::fun_d; for(int i=0; i<1000; i++) { (this->*fun)(i); fun_f(i); }


6

Your code has a bunch of problems. Are you sure you're measuring what you think you're measuring? Your first loop does this, indented more conventionally: for(int j=0;j<1000;i++) { b=vektors[i]; // selects next vector(b) to multiply as inner product. // each vector has an array of float elements. } Your rolled loop involves ...


6

Did you compile with optimizations? For me, with -O2, there's not really a difference between these snippets: map1, map2, and map4 ran in 279, 267, and 285ms, respectively (and for comparison, map itself ran in 278ms). So that just looks like measurement noise rather than improvement to me. That said, you might like to look at this GHC plugin which seems to ...


6

#pragma unroll is the only mechanism for requesting unrolling that is documented in the CUDA C Programming Guide 5.5, and it must be specified before each loop. But the compiler unrolls all "small loops with a known trip count" by default, so you may not need the unroll directives in your first example. I don't think controlling unrolling at the function ...


5

If we can assume that the number of set bits in intr is low (as it is usually the case in interrupt masks) we can optimize a little bit and write a loop that executes for each bit only once: void handle (int intr) { while (intr) { // find index of lowest bit set in intr: int bit_id = __builtin_ffs(intr)-1; // call handler: if (bit_id ...


5

Whether the compiler will perform the optimization or not is different from whether it will treat the value as a compile time constant. In your particular example, and because the static const has not been defined anywhere, if the linker did not complain it means that the compiler only used it as a const-expression (compile time constant). Also note that if ...


5

Loop unrolling won't give you any benefit for this code, because the overhead of the function call to printf() itself dominates the work done at each iteration. The compiler may be aware of this, and since it is being asked to optimize the code, it may decide that unrolling increases the code size for no appreciable run-time performance gain, and decides the ...


5

There is no single answer about whether unrolling all 100 iterations of the loop would be effective. For "smaller" system with no code cache, chances are pretty good that unrolling all 100 iterations would be optimal, at least in terms of execution speed. On the other hand, a system small enough that its CPU doesn't have a cache will typically be ...


5

with a static array will D unroll the foreach for me automatically? No, the language does not guarantee it. Some implementations (compilers) might unroll the loop as an optimization. If not could my implementation of static iota (siota) be used to achieve this? Yes, using foreach over a tuple generates code for every "iteration", effectively ...


5

The O3 flag turns on -ftree-vectorize automatically. https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Optimize-Options.html -O3 turns on all optimizations specified by -O2 and also turns on the -finline-functions, -funswitch-loops, -fpredictive-commoning, -fgcse-after-reload, -ftree-loop-vectorize, -ftree-loop-distribute-patterns, -ftree-slp-vectorize, ...


4

There's a stadard solution for this. Convert iteration into recursion. template<int i> void Device::createSubDomains() { SubDomain<i> tmp(member); // some operations on tmp createSubDomains<i-1>(); } template<> void Device<-1>::createSubDomains() { // End of recursion. } Note: you can't use a runtime if(i!=0) ...


4

Why this happens? From 14.5.5/8, — The type of a template parameter corresponding to a specialized non-type argument shall not be dependent on a parameter of the specialization. [ Example: template <class T, T t> struct C {}; template <class T> struct C<T, 1>; // error template< int X, int (*array_ptr)[X] > class A {}; ...


4

Yes, it's possible. Choose your project file from the project navigator. Then choose the target. Click the Build Phases tab. Open the Compile Sources section. Double-click the source file of interest and add the compiler flag. Here's a picture:


4

I have done a little research on this (and am drawing from knowledge from a similar project I did in C with matrix multiplication), but take my answer with a grain of salt as I am by no means an expert on this topic. As for your first question, I think the speedup is coming from your loop unrolling; you're making roughly 87% fewer condition checks in terms ...


4

What you want is a Dictionary: Dictionary<string, string> mapping = new Dictionary<string, string>(); mapping["SWGAS.COM"] = "Southwest Gas"; mapping["foo"] = "bar"; ... as many as you need, maybe read from a file ... Then just: return mapping[inputString]; Done.


4

One way of doing it (other answers show very valid options): void Main() { string input = "georgiapower.com"; string output = null; // an array of string arrays...an array of Tuples would also work, // or a List<T> with any two-member type, etc. var search = new []{ new []{ "SWGAS.COM", "Southwest Gas"}, new []{ ...


4

gcc has maximum loops unroll parameters. You have to use -O3 -funroll-loops and play with parameters max-unroll-times, max-unrolled-insns and max-average-unrolled-insns. Example: -O3 -funroll-loops --param max-unroll-times=200



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