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32

While I don't know how to answer this question in a single paragraph, I attempted to answer it in a blog post instead: http://blog.ploeh.dk/2012/02/02/LooseCouplingAndTheBigPicture.aspx To summarize, I find that the most important points are: Understanding a loosely coupled code base requires a different mindset. While it's harder to 'jump to ...


29

Loose Coupling allows you to make changes in one area of the application without affecting the others. Theoretically it allows you to do things like change your Data Access Layer without rebuilding your Business or UI Layers. It definitely makes your applications more flexible, more adept at change, and easier to maintain (since you don't have to worry ...


14

It will save you a lot of time for any project that isn't trivially small, where I define trivially small as less than a couple thousand lines of code (depending on the language). The reason is that once you get past super small projects, each change or update gets harder the more tightly coupled it is. Being loosely coupled enables you to keep moving ...


13

Model-View-Controller. Aside: things that stops me writing coupled applications aren't just patterns: Naming. If I can't easily think of a name for my class, it either does nothing or too many things. Testability. If I can't easily mock out my class' dependencies, it's a coupled design.


11

This is a very broad question - possibly too broad to answer. However, two methodologies that can provide a solution with "loose coupling" are: Dependency Injection Dependency Injection (especially when using an Inversion of Control Container) provides loose coupling within an application or solution - With dependency injection you do not hard code your ...


11

Some tools are aware of DI frameworks and know how to resolve dependencies, allowing you to navigate your code in a natural way. But when that isn't available, you just have to use whatever features your IDE provides as best you can. I use Visual Studio and a custom-made framework, so the problem you describe is my life. In Visual Studio, SHIFT+F12 is my ...


10

On the paper, there are many advantages of loose coupling, but in practise, it's hard to make it right IMHO. Here are some advantages: Systems can evolve independently in terms of lifecycle. Systems can be written in different languages, and ultimately run on different OSes. Systems can (and should) be built by different teams. You can outsource the ...


9

Step 1: Stop thinking like a Java programmer. You're in Lua now. There are no classes with explicit and compile-time fixed prototypes. Functions are first-class objects; they are values. So break the problem down in that way. You have a bunch of "rules" (ie: functions). You want to apply some of those rules to certain data. You have a configuration system ...


8

You Business Logic Layer is really your Domain Model, and a Domain Model should be expressed in a technology-agnostic way; i.e. without dependencies on any particular technologies such as ASP.NET MVC, WPF, WCF, EF, NHibernate or whatnot. It's best if you can express your Domain Model as POCOs (Plain Old CLR Objects), but, as you are already suspecting, this ...


8

A loosely coupled architecture will help you when your application needs to change or grow. And any non-trivial application will eventually need to change or grow. If you design with a loosely coupled architecture, only a few parts of the application should be affected when requirements change. With a too tight coupled architecture, many parts will need to ...


8

First of all, you're comparing apples to oranges, so let me try to explain this from two perspectives. Typing refers to how operations on values/variables are performed and if they are allowed. Coupling, as opposed to cohesion, refers to the architecture of a piece (or several pieces) of software. The two aren't directly related at all. Strong vs Weak ...


8

I just had an internal discussion about this, and ended up writing this piece, which I think is too good not to share. I'm copying it here (almost) unedited, but even though it's part of a bigger internal discussion, I think most of it can stand alone. The discussion is about introduction of a custom interface called IPurchaseReceiptService, and whether or ...


7

You should define interfaces for dependencies between layers, not for every class. So your Service layer should depend on a repository interface, and your presentation layer should depend on a service interface. Past that, there aren't many hard and fast rules, other then use them where it makes sense. Common sense is a good part of any good design.


7

I find myself using the Command pattern quite often. It's a pattern that just keeps giving project after project.


7

The biggest advantage is that introducing changes to one module does not break other modules in unpredictable ways.


7

However, because of the looseness of the coupling, looking at a class tells you nothing about the classes around it or where it fits in the larger picture. This is not accurate.For each class you know exactly what kind of objects the class depends on, to be able to provide its functionality at runtime. You know them since you know that what objects ...


7

Serialization The ASP.NET pipeline is designed for this. Your controller actions don't return the result to the client, but rather a result object (ActionResult) which is then processed in further steps in the ASP.NET pipeline. You can override the ActionResult class. Note that FileResult, JsonResult, ContentResult and FileContentResult are built-in as of ...


6

In general you have 3 different techniques: Delegation KVO (Key-Value Observing) Notifications If your model only needs to inform one object (your view controller) of changes, delegation is the way to go. It may feel like extra work to create a new interface, add the delegate property to the model, etc. but it is definitely worth it in terms of ...


6

but it seems like the only way I can get around this is to use a custom model binder A custom model binder is the correct way to go. And by the way you should use view models as action arguments, not domain models or interfaces. Not only does custom model binding seem messy - won't I also lose my DataAnnotations? I don't know why you think that a ...


6

I think you're mixing up your terminology a bit. "Loosely coupled" refers to the desirability of having software components that aren't so dependent upon each other that they can't function or even compile without being together in the same program. I've never seen the term used to describe the relationships between tables in the same database. I think if ...


6

Dependency injection with spring is my favourite. Additionally with maven it's common to do this really neat trick of hiding all the implementations behind an API module. So if your code has three modules, "application-core", "externalsystems-api" and "externalsystems", you can make "application-core" depend ONLY on externalsystems-api. The ...


6

Deferreds are really the way to go here. They capture exactly what you (and a whole lot of async code) want: "go away and do this potentially expensive thing, don't bother me in the meantime, and then do this when you get back." And you don't need jQuery to use them. An enterprising individual has ported Deferred to underscore, and claims you don't even ...


5

I would suggest two concepts, interfaces and dependency injection, as a way to decouple your classes. Interfaces give you a way to define a contract or set of expected behaviors that is independent of any implementation. When you have a class depend on an interface rather than on a class, you get the freedom to substitute other classes that implement the ...


5

I believe you've missed on some basic concepts. The idea behind OOP starts with discrete, reusable units of logic. With an emphasis on creating self-sufficient modules. In the case of the RTF Memo component, it meets the above criteria by handling a given set of data (the memo) in such a way that your program and other objects within your program don't ...


5

Finally cracked it ... thanks for you assistance - heres the solution in case anyones interested? Note that in the Configure method the IType has to be passed to the base as an int. public class ManufacturerMap : ClassMap<Manufacturer> { public ManufacturerMap() { Id(x => x.ID).GeneratedBy.Custom<StringTableHiLoGenerator>(a ...


5

Without knowing specifics of your design, that's how the Interface Segregation Principle (pdf) is supposed to work. You should provide an interface for every class that you may need to swap out the implementation for (I wouldn't create an interface for each DTO, for example).


5

One thing that helped me is placing multiple closely related classes in the same file. I know this goes against the general advice (of having 1 class per file) and I generally agree with this, but in my application architecture it works very well. Below I will try to explain in which case this is. The architecture of my business layer is designed around the ...


5

A Lay Man's Explanation, You have two classes, Class A and Class B that probably interact together. if they are loosely coupled, Class A would do what it is supposed to Do(what you want it to do) without knowing the details of Class B's Implementation Hope it makes some Sense?


5

Understanding the how and understanding the why are very different things.. One of the biggest benefits of DI is for unit testing. In your second example it's impossible to unit test Billing without also testing CustomerService (and also testing any further dependencies in the chain). In that case you're not unit testing, you're integration testing! If you ...



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