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1

There's a pretty steep learning curve as far as value categories are concerned (at least to me), but I believe you have got the terminology right on your example. So func() indeed returns a prvalue and from the C++ Standard par. 3.10.5 (I only have the current draft, your paragraph number may vary) we read : An lvalue for an object is necessary in ...


5

The return value of the function is in fact an rvalue. Indeed, you may not call the copy assignment operator on rvalue primitives. The historical definition of rvalues in C was in fact the distinction that they may not be on the left side of an assigment. The assignment operators of classes are a bit different, though. They're regular member functions. And ...


7

The synthesized assignment operator is declared as one of these (if it can be synthesized and isn't declared as deleted) according to see 12.8 [class.copy] paragraph 18: Y& Y::operator=(Y const&) Y& Y::operator=(Y&) () That is, like for any other member function which isn't specifically declared with ref-qualifiers it is applicable to ...


1

Not sure where you got that specific rule of thumb. If any, a rule of thumb would be (from Scott Meyers): if it has a name, it's an lvalue. In this case, you're creating a temporary object and passing it to an assignment method/function. There is no problem with that. In fact, it might even make sense to do so, as in // Applies foo to a copy, not the ...



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