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27

After a bit of trial and error... as mentioned in the possible answers, it turned out to require xfs_growfs rather than resize2fs. CentOS 7, fdisk /dev/xvda Create new primary partition, set type as linux lvm. n p 3 t 8e w Create a new primary volume and extend the volume group to the new volume. partprobe pvcreate /dev/xvda3 vgextend /dev/centos ...


23

The following is for a Fedora/RHEL system, so you'll need to adjust for Debian... # systemctl stop docker.service # thin_check /var/lib/docker/devicemapper/devicemapper/metadata If there were no errors then proceed with: # thin_check --clear-needs-check-flag /var/lib/docker/devicemapper/devicemapper/metadata # systemctl start docker.service # docker run ...


18

I ran into the same exact problem around noon today and finally found a solution here --> Trying to resize2fs EB volume fails I skipped mounting, since the partition was already mounted. Apparently CentOS 7 uses XFS as the default file system and as a result resize2fs will fail. I took a look in /etc/fstab, and guess what, XFS was staring me in the ...


17

lvchange -an <lvpath> vgchange -an <vgname> If you also want to remove the device maps you can use dmsetup ls dmsetup remove <name>


10

Maybe device-mapper is 'stealing' this device. Try this: [root@host ~]# dmsetup ls sdb (253, 2) VolGroup00-LogVol01 (253, 1) VolGroup00-LogVol00 (253, 0) If you find sdb device listed as above example, remove it using dmsetup and create the physical volume: [root@host ~]# dmsetup remove sdb [root@host ~]# pvcreate /dev/sdb Physical volume ...


9

You should read the benefits of EBS vs instance store. I also wrote a bit about the PostgreSQL angle of this on my work blog recently. See also what root device to use for a new EC2 instance and the other questions listed in the Related sidebar. Instance store will eventually EAT YOUR DATA unless you carefully set up replication and regular backups. If an ...


8

The config uses a custom config language specifically for LVM. The lvm userspace tools include code to parse this language. You could grab the userspace code for lvm2 and attempt to replicate its parser, maybe using Parse::RecDescent. Or maybe the Perl Linux::LVM module in CPAN provides the functionality to extract the information you need.


5

There is a bug with xfs_growfs which causes inodes to not be properly distributed across a partition. The solution is to simply remount with the inode64 option. For example, if this was the /dev/vda1, you would do the following: mount -o remount,inode64 /dev/vda1 You can find more information about the bug at the following link: ...


5

You can use 'dmsetup remove_all' to remove this mapping. You shouldn't need to use -f (force), but if you do, it may remove mappings that are in use.


4

Running with LVM snapshot enabled can cause I/O performance to degrade up to 6x. http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/2009/02/05/disaster-lvm-performance-in-snapshot-mode/ I suggest using Percona XtraBackup as a much better hot backup tool (disclaimer: I work for Percona).


4

When the docker partition filled and docker would no longer start after reboot, I encountered this: # thin_check /var/lib/docker/devicemapper/devicemapper/metadata examining superblock examining devices tree missing devices: [0, -] bad checksum in btree node examining mapping tree thin device 72 is missing mappings [137494, 137594] bad checksum ...


4

I just built a test virtual machine with a 15GB disk and LVM on /dev/sda2. Then I grew the disk to 20GB and made LVM see the extra 5GB without adding another physical volume. Here are the steps I followed: apt-get install gnu-fdisk (or yum install gnu-fdisk) I had to use gfdisk to make the whole thing work. No luck with the "standard" fdisk. gfdisk ...


4

Take a look at kpartx - it's especially useful for managing VMs where entire file systems are often packed into single volumes. kpartx can create device nodes for partitions nested on a block device or disk image. Mount (one of the following) : kpartx -av your_vm_disk.img kpartx -av /dev/mapper/your_device Where your_device could be an lvm ...


3

Use fatresize (manpage) and then proceed with lvresize. To avoid truncating the FS, you should first shrink the VFAT volume a few hundreds (to be safe) megabytes more than wanted, then resize the LVM container and finally grow the volume to fill the LVM partition. Besides, this question does not belong to StackOverflow but to ServerFault.


3

Especially with the ease of rooting a device and copying it anyway, obfuscation is your friend here, especially if copy protection is making your app sp much larger. And copy protecting a free app is kinda pointless anyway, no? I'd just disable it, and obfuscate if you're worried.


3

CentOS7 + VM Ive made it with: Gparted-live extend the volume pvresize -v /dev/sda2 lvresize -r -l+100%FREE centos/root


2

You are not invoking the "missing" logging.debug since lvmCreateSnapshot returns zero and your if condition is therefore never met. Try if lvm_create_snapshot: logging.debug('Error creating lvm snapshot of %s/%s, exited with status %s', lvm_vg, lvm_name, lvm_create_snapshot) else: logging.debug('created lvm snapshot of %s/%s, lvm_vg, lvm_name) so ...


2

No answers + deadline to meet = write it myself. For future reference, it was only a few lines of code, using libparted. For readability, I've omitted error checking, etc. Caller is responsible for ensuring there's enough space in the partition for the new filesystem size. #include <parted/parted.h> int resize_filesystem(const char *device, ...


2

LVM's concept of volumes is not portable across systems in the same sense that you can slap some md drives together and they'll still work. Each LVM vg has a unique identifier and you need to get your system's LVM to accept it. In other words, LVM can't "see" the volume group until you "tell" it about its presence. Once you do that, it should be smooth ...


2

Personally I followed the instruction in this blog. To summarize the steps: Increase the virtual disk size using the vm-ware tools vmware-vdiskmanager Boot on another system (GParted live CD or mount an Iso CD-ROM to boot on) Use the Gparted tools (easy and graphic interface) to increase the recently expended drive remove the CD-ROM (or the ISO) and ...


2

LVM snapshots are very scary for InnoDB under certain circumstances. Why? If you have innodb_file_per_table disabled, ibdata1 will have everything and its grandmother in it. What lives in ibdata1? Four things: Data Pages Index Pages Metadata (such as List of TableSpave IDs) MVCC Data If you are trying to perform LVM snapshots in a heavy-write DB ...


2

You can't include the 2> /dev/null inside the quoted string. Quote removal happens after redirections are processed. You'll have to do cmd='pvs --noheadings -o vg_name,pv_name,pv_size' $cmd 2> /dev/null for redirection to work properly.


2

Neither copy protection nor obfuscation will help against determined attacker with some skills and cheap time. I would be more worried and embarassed if nobody copied my free application ( basucally I have no problem with it unless somebody tries to steal copyright - but I make my money with programming for money, so apps are my showcase)


2

I need to emphasize that there is no direct relation between a mountpoint (logical volume) and a physical volume in LVM. This is one of its design goals. However you can traverse the associations between the logical volume, the volume group and physical volumes assigned to that group. However this only tells you: The data is stored on one of those physical ...


2

There is no direct command to show that information for a mount. You can run lvdisplay -m Which will show which physical volumes are currently being used by the logical volume. Remember, thought, that there is no such thing as a direct association between a logical volume and a physical volume. Logical volumes are associated with volume groups. Volume ...


2

I do vgchange -an <vgpath> before I remove the disk and vgchange -ay <vgpath> after I connected it again. Otherwise, any LVM display command will produce input/output errors, and the partition will not be mountable.


2

According to perldoc system, "Return value of -1 indicates a failure to start the program or an error of the wait(2) system call (inspect $! for the reason)." So the reason there's no output is because lvs isn't being started successfully. Given the usual nature of cron-related problems, I'd say the most likely reason it's failing to run would be that it's ...


2

Your syntax is wrong - it's not -login, it's -l or --login (note the two dashes): # iscsiadm -m node --targetname iqn2015-04.com.blue:store.target1 -p 1.0.0.13 --login


2

The syntax was incorrect. It should have been --targetname. Complete statement is as follows. iscsiadm --mode node --targetname iqn2015-04.com.blue:store.target1 --portal store.blue.com:3260 --login


2

In your case a quick: [diskstats] env.exclude lv should be enough. This should go in /etc/munin/munin.conf below the configuration of this host.



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