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8

Using glOrtho(0, 640, 0, 480, 1, -1); constructs a non-square viewport. That means that the rendered output is more than likely going to be skewed if your window is not the same size as your viewport (or at least the same aspect ratio). Consider the following comparison: If your viewport is the same size as your window, then it should remain square. I'...


6

flat qualified fragment shader inputs will receive the same value for the same primitive. In your case, a triangle. Of course, a triangle is composed of 3 vertices. And if the vertex shaders output 3 different values, how does the fragment shader know which value to get? This comes down to what is called the "provoking vertex." When you render, you specify ...


5

Your problem is not sizeof float, but the data layout in your buffer. The statement val interleavedBuffer: FloatBuffer = prepareFloatBuffer(positions ++ textureCoordinates) Creates a buffer of the layout xyz[0],xyz[1],…,xyz[n],st[0],st[1],…,st[m] However what you configure OpenGL to expect is xyz[0],st[0],xyz[1],st[1],…,xyz[n],st[n] You can either ...


5

The lwjgl layer is telling you that your buffer should be at least 14309568 bytes big, but you provide only 3577392. The reason for this is that you used GL_INT as the format parameter of the glTexImage2D call, so each pixel is assumed to be represented by 3 4-byte integer values bz the GL. You just want to use GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE for typical 8 bit per channel ...


5

Never mind, i checked the source site and it appears that in fact they changed it so it's now this: GLFWVidMode vidmode = glfwGetVideoMode(glfwGetPrimaryMonitor()); glfwSetWindowPos( window, (vidmode.width() - width) / 2, (vidmode.height() - height) / 2 );


4

position , y lol. You have a comma instead of a period. it should be position**.**y.


4

You can model the camera a bit differently. Split the position into a current position and a target position. When you want to move the camera, only move the target position. Then, each frame, update the current camera position to get closer to the target position. I have good experience with the following update: factor = f ^ t currentCamera = factor * ...


4

Comparing your Matrix.rotate code with the linked code, you first do this.m00 = t00 and then later you do this.m20 = this.m00 * f20 + this.m10 * f21 + this.m20 * f22 using the this.m00 you just modified. You do this a couple of times in a similar way. The example code does this the other way around, which means the end result is different. Swap the ...


4

First of all, using 4*4 as size argument for glVertexAttribPointer is invalid. Valid sizes are 1 to 4, and 4 is exactly what you want here, as you need 4 channels to encode RGBA vectors. The second version is not really useful. If we ignore the bogus 1*4 in the same way and use only one channel, it could work in principle, but glVertexAttribPointer cannot ...


4

I didn't look at your code in full detail, but there seems to be a basic misunderstanding about how vertex attributes work. In the vertex shader, you have these attributes, which look fine: in vec4 position; in vec3 normals; in vec2 texCoords; But then in the fragment shader, you have these definitions: in vec3 Ks; in vec3 Ka; in vec3 Kd; Based on the ...


4

I doubt that the bindAttributes() function would work reliably in any Java version. Maybe you were just fortunate that the attribute locations ended up being what you expected them to be. Looking at this code: protected void bindAttributes() { int loc = 0; super.bindAttribute(GL20.glGetAttribLocation(loc, "position"), "position"); super....


4

There are two possibilities. The first one is that your graphics card is out of date. In this case you should update your driver with a software of your card manufacturer(e.g. Nvidia, AMD, ...). This can only happen if you run it on a different machine. The second possibility is that your IDE-jre and you external jre have different versions. In this case you ...


4

When changing the orientation of the y-axis, also the winding order of the primitives changes. So if backface culling is enabled, one has to adjust the winding order by setting it with glFontFace(GL_CCW)


4

You're missing the native libraries. As described in this link https://www.lwjgl.org/guide you'll have to setup java.library.path to the native library location. I downloaded the library and copied the HelloWorld code in the above link in HelloWorld.java inside the directory where I extracted the library. So the contents inside looks like below /...


4

Is it true that GLFW is not for creating graphics, but just for creating displays? And GLFW is not for using alone, you still should just use the LWJGL library to have access to the OpenGL functions to create graphics? Yes. Can someone explain why I would use GLFW? And it seems there is a relation between LWJGL3 and GLFW, but what has it to do with ...


4

You should: avoid blending for the moment move glTexParameteri into the texture loading/initialization, since it is part of the texture. Or use a sampler call glActiveTexture before glBindTexture in the texture loading check Shaders.texUnitLoc != -1 in the rendering avoid either: binding/unbinding the vao and add glVertexAttribPointer calling ...


4

Ok, so I did a bunch more digging and found that OSx defaults to using GL 2.1, even if it has newer software installed. Seems kinda silly, however it is how it works. If any of you guys ran into this problem as well, the solution I found was to put these lines of code in before you create the window. I am not certain that you have to do it then, however ...


3

I just had the exact same problem, and i solved it by adding GLContext.createFromCurrent(); to init(). From this answer: http://stackoverflow.com/a/28133516/4080745


3

If it's a screen aligned rectangle, then using a scissor rect is the best solution. See: https://www.khronos.org/opengles/sdk/docs/man/xhtml/glScissor.xml


3

The results you are getting are absoutely correct, your interpretations of them are not: 0 is for the fixed-function pipeline, so having something bound there is going to completely crash the program, No. 0 is a perfectly valid uniform location, which has nothing to do the fixed function pipeline. You somehow seem to confuse the program object 0 (...


3

Extra artifacts in Maven modules must be explicitly retrieved in the ivy dependency declaration. You'll also need to specify the pattern used in the retrieve task, because "classifier" is a Maven specific tag and optional. Example ├── build.xml ├── ivy.xml └── target └── lib ├── lwjgl-3.0.0a.jar ├── lwjgl-platform-3.0.0a-natives-linux....


3

I recommend using an UncaughtHandler to catch any exceptions that aren't handled and would actually crash the game. You weren't specific as to which version of LWJGL you are using, but if you are using LWJGL 2 it has a Sys class that lets you display an alert. Sys.alert(Title, Message) Unfortunately LWJGL 3 removed this class and GLFW doesn't seem to ...


2

I am also in the process of making a game via LWJGL. I use a fairly simple process for determining collisions. First, I find all entities within a certain distance of the focal entity. I use a method like this: public static float getDistance(Vector3f pointOne, Vector3f pointTwo) { float distance = 0; float x1 = pointOne.x; float y1 = ...


2

1) Look in your regkeys (under local_machine/Software/Krono/vendors or software/AMD). These things are usually controlled by regkeys. I'm not sure what AMD uses though. 2) Make sure both cards have the same driver version. Otherwise it could be that AMD driver only allows one 2.0 device on any machine due to potential coherence issues between devices. 2.0 ...


2

Problem 1) It seems that AMD's OpenCL implementation works for all x86 CPUs. I don't have hard facts on this, only another similiar discussion on Khronos forums. A solution could be to filter out devices based on the name reported by different platforms, but I don't know if it is guaranteed that different platforms will always report the same name for the ...


2

glGenBuffers(int n, ByteBuffer buffer) generates n vertex buffer objects (VBOs), which you can use to store your data, and puts them in the specified buffer. This buffer is not actually the one that holds your data, but the ids of the VBOs just generated. You have to manually define the VBO data with glBufferData. The function is useful if you want to ...


2

You are right, the given solution is not 100% correct. What he is trying to do is the so called Separating Axis Theorem (or Hyperplane separation theorem). In the first half he's testing the axis defined by the planes of the frustum and in the second half he's testing the axis defined by the AABB. This is both correct and required for the SAT test. What ...


2

By calling glDisableVertexAttribArray while the VAO was still bound you can't access these attributes while rendering, because the vertex attributes are part of the VAO state. I won't go into that much detail, because there a alot of other ressources explaining VAOs. For example: What are Vertex Array Objects? glVertexAttribPointer clarification So here ...


2

An old thread, but it might help someone. Depending on which LWJGL you're using, init your Display: LWJGL 3 (uses GLFW): if (!glfwInit()) { throw new IllegalStateException("Can't init GLFW"); } LWJGL 2: try { Display.setDisplayMode(new DisplayMode(800, 600)); Display.create(); } catch (LWJGLException ex) { Logger.getLogger(Main.class.getName(...


2

You must re-link your program after binding attribute locations. This is outlined in the documentation for glBindAttribLocation (...) as follows: Name glBindAttribLocation — Associates a generic vertex attribute index with a named attribute variable C Specification void glBindAttribLocation( GLuint program, ...



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