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6

Is it possible to get rid of the namespace mapping? Do you need to pass it as a parameter into each function call? An option would be to set the prefixes to be used at the XML document in a property. That's fine until you pass the XML document into a 3rd party function. That function wants to use prefixes as well, so it sets the property to something else,...


4

They think you are a bot and are not allowing you to pull the content Key lesson here - when you don't get what you expect, inspect what you get. To get the text below I just took the content and printed it. >>>import requests >>>page = requests.get('http://www.bizjournals.com/milwaukee/datacenter/project-watch-what-is-being-built-in-...


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There is no silver bullet. Different HTML parsers behave differently and you should pick the one that works for your particular page. Works in this case basically means, that you can get to your desired data. lxml parser is generally faster, html5lib is the most lenient one - this kind of difference would be relevant if you have a broken or non-well-formed ...


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testing.xpath("//div") returns you a list of matching div nodes. For every div node, you ask to find all a elements, but // at the beginning of the expression would start the search from the root of the document tree. You need to make the search specific to every div in the list by prepending a dot: [x.xpath(".//a/text()") for x in testing] # HERE^ Or,...


2

nodeA.extend(nodes) See here for more documentation on the ElementTreeAPI


2

Your target element is in the default namespace : xmlns="http://example.com/ns/xyz/xxx-op" You need to map a prefix to the default namespace URI, and use that prefix to reference element in the namespace : ns = {'d': 'http://example.com/ns/xyz/xxx-op'} memoryElem = doc.find('.//d:Y', ns) print memoryElem.text


2

The nsmap property on the root element holds a dictionary with all declared namespaces. Example: from lxml import etree XML = "your XML document here..." root = etree.fromstring(XML) for ns in sorted(root.nsmap.items()): print ns Output: ('calcext', 'urn:org:documentfoundation:names:experimental:calc:xmlns:calcext:1.0') ('chart', 'urn:oasis:names:...


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If you need to avoid repeating nsmap parameters using ElementTree in Python, consider transforming your XML with XSLT to remove namespaces and return local element names. And Python's lxml can run XSLT 1.0 scripts. As information, XSLT is a special-purpose declarative language (same family as XPath but interacts with whole documents) used specifically to ...


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Use the contains() XPath function: //subject[contains(., 'home')]/text() Demo: >>> import lxml.etree as ET >>> >>> data = """<?xml version="1.0" ?> ... <zAppointments reminder="15"> ... <appointment> ... <subject>Bring pizza home</subject> ... </appointment> ... <...


2

using lxml: h = """<div id="ANALYSIS" class="tabContent tabSelected">A weak handicap that looked wide open.<br><br> <b class="black">LADY MAKFI</b> showed vastly improved form to shed her maiden tag on this seasonal debut for a new yard. The filly offered little for Tony Martin last year, but did show some ability on her debut ...


2

Python's get() method for dictionaries is very helpful in these situations because it returns None when a key isn't found in a dict. for elem in netFile.iter(tag='edge'): if elem.attrib.get('from'): # from stuff else: # other stuff


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The comment should really cause no issues with etree and does not on my machine using python2 or python3, if you do want to remove comments though you can pass parser=et.HTMLParser(remove_comments=True) or parser=et.XMLParser(remove_comments=True)) depending on what you want: import lxml.etree as et x = et.parse("test.xml", parser=et.HTMLParser(...


2

With lxml+requests setup, you operate on a different level, a lower level. There are no dropdowns for requests, it is not a browser. The general approach to your problem is to: open Browser Developer Tools in your browser of choice, Network tab select an option in the dropdown observe the request(s) sent to the server in the Network tab simulate this/...


1

@Padraic. Thanks a lot! Your code is mostly what I want. But if I insert additional node (for example attributes) which is child of country node and parent for the neighbor node it gives unexpected results: <data> <country name="Liechtenstein"> <attributes> <rank>1</rank> <year>2008</year> <gdppc>...


1

If I understand you correctly you want something like: look_through_structure(parent, my_tag): for node in parent.iter("*"): out_str.write('Parent tag: %s\n' % node.tag) for nxt in node: if nxt.tag == my_tag: out_str.write('child tag: %s\n' % my_tag) return out_str.write('Parent tag:...


1

You can use html.parser.unescape(): import html.parser as hp import re data = response.text soup = BeautifulSoup(hp.unescape(data), "lxml") p = soup.find(text=re.compile("Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13")) print(p) Why you text fails is there is a newline also, the following regex works: p = soup.find(text=re.compile("Pursuant\s+to\s+the\s+...


1

You could get multiple attribute in a single expression but you would need to add them in the order they appear if you wanted to know what belongs to which: .xpath(('//race/nomination/@*[name() = "number" or name() = "saddlecloth" or name() = "horse"]' Another option is to pull from the attrib dict, using operator.itemgetter: from operator import ...


1

You are on the right track with: gpx.xpath("//ele", namespaces = {'ele': "http://www.topografix.com/GPX/1/1"}) Because there is a default namespace in the XML, the XPath //ele on it's own won't find the ele element in the http://www.topografix.com/GPX/1/1 namespace. It is therefore necessary to register a prefix with the XPath provider, which you have ...


1

You can just call .items to get the name and value: In [3]: import lxml.etree as et In [4]: x = et.fromstring("""<ana lex="ун" morph="ың" gr="NUM,poss.2sg" trans="десять" />""") In [5]: x.attrib Out[5]: {'trans': 'десять', 'lex': 'ун', 'gr': 'NUM,poss.2sg', 'morph': 'ың'} In [6]: x.items() Out[6]: [('lex', 'ун'), ('morph', 'ың'), ('gr', 'NUM,poss....


1

Use glob to get a list of all the files that match your pattern: import glob import os from lxml import etree dir = '/path/to/the/parent/directory/' for file in glob.iglob(os.path.join(dir, '*/*.xml')): with open(file) as f: data = etree.parse(f)


1

You have tagged this lxml so there are much simpler ways to to selectively iterate through the edges in which the attribute 'from' is present , you can use the following xpath to find all the edges that have the from attribute: for e in root.xpath("//edge[@from]") If you want to check for having multiple attributes you can use and: .xpath("//edge[@from ...


1

It does make sense that triggers.hudson.triggers.TimerTrigger interpreted as trying to access <TimerTrigger> element in the following structure, hence it complained about hudson child element not found when given OP's actual XML : <triggers> <hudson> <triggers> <TimerTrigger> <spec>H H(6-21)/3 * * *...


1

The following code using lxml's etree module worked for me to get the text from <spec>: from lxml import etree root = etree.parse("37757193.xml").getroot() spec = root.xpath("//triggers/hudson.triggers.TimerTrigger/spec")[0] print(spec.text) returns 'H H(6-21)/3 * * *'.


1

I prefer Beautiful Soup's api over using lxml directly. I can avoid xpath entirely and just write python. import bs4 soup = bs4.BeautifulSoup(document, 'lxml') [b.text + b.next_sibling.rstrip() for b in soup.find_all('b')] output: ['LADY MAKFI showed vastly improved form to shed her maiden tag on this seasonal debut for a new yard. The filly offered ...


1

This is a working example: from lxml import etree as et xml = et.parse("your.xml") root = xml.getroot() d = root.nsmap for node in root.xpath("//draw:image", namespaces=d): node.attrib["{http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink}href"] = "value" node.attrib["{http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink}show"] = "embed" print(et.tostring(xml)) Which for: <?xml version="...


1

Not sure what the ... should be in your expected output but to get the data in the first three sublists, you can narrow down the search looking for trs that have a nowrap attribute and only one attribute altogether: from lxml import html root = html.fromstring(h) rows = root.xpath("//tr[td[@nowrap and text() and count(@*)=1]]") data = list() for row in ...


1

You will have to traverse the html document and get a more refined XPath. Additionally, you face the challenge of related data in different elements requiring two XPath expressions. This will require some manipulation to get the final related results together: import lxml.etree as et with open("employeetest.htm",'r') as f: text = f.read().replace('&...


1

No. For one thing, the python-dev package is specific to Debian-like distributions; there is no guarantee that other distributions will have a package with the same name that fulfills the desired role. For another, the user installing your Python package may have permission to install Python modules (e.g., in a virtualenv or user-specific directory) but ...


1

Using lxml, you can pull the table directly using the class name and extract all the tbody tags with the xpath //table[@class="grid resultRaceGrid"]/tbody from lxml import html x = html.parse("http://www.racingpost.com/horses/result_home.sd?race_id=651402&r_date=2016-06-07&popup=yes#results_top_tabs=re_&results_bottom_tabs=ANALYSIS") tbodys= x....


1

As mentioned by @jwodder, the xml file was not encoded with utf-8 encoding even though it had utf-8 as encoding attribute. . I changed my encoding params to ISO-8859-1 in lxml parser. parsed_doc = etree.parse(u, etree.XMLParser(encoding='ISO-8859-1', ns_clean=True, recover=True)) It worked perfectly.



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