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173

The first function in an m-file (i.e. the main function), is invoked when that m-file is called. It is not required that the main function have the same name as the m-file, but for clarity it should. When the function and file name differ, the file name must be used to call the main function. All subsequent functions in the m-file, called local functions ...


43

Generally, the answer to your question is no, you cannot define more than one externally visible function per file. You can return function handles to local functions, though, and a convenient way to do so is to make them fields of a struct. Here is an example: function funs = makefuns funs.fun1=@fun1; funs.fun2=@fun2; end function y=fun1(x) y=x; end ...


24

The only way to have multiple, separately accessible functions in a single file is to define STATIC METHODS using object-oriented programming. You'd access the function as myClass.static1(), myClass.static2() etc. OOP functionality is only officially supported since R2008a, so unless you want to use the old, undocumented OOP syntax, the answer for you is ...


12

I really like SCFrench's answer - I would like to point out that it can easily be modified to import the functions directly to the workspace using the assignin function. (Doing it like this reminds me a lot of Python's "import x from y" way of doing things) function message = makefuns assignin('base','fun1',@fun1); assignin('base','fun2',@fun2); ...


7

Read this manual page. You could use the startup.m file for this.


6

Although my answer will stray away from programming and into the realm of calculus, it should be noted that you can solve your problem both without recursion or a loop since you can exactly solve for an equation v(t) using integration. It appears that you are modeling Stokes' drag on a falling body, so you can use the fourth formula from this integration ...


6

MATLAB Coder will generate C code for mex files. I do not yet have a copy to evaluate, so I can't speak with any authority about the quality and nature of the generated code. However, if I had to guess, I'd say the generated code would likely require a lot of massaging to get it working on your GPU. You may have better luck with a product like Jacket, ...


6

This is common, for instance try edit sum, you will not be able to see the code. When referring to MATLAB built-in functions it's usually meant exactly those functions whose implementation is not carried out with MATLAB language but embedded into the program. Built-in functions are part of TMW know-how and therefore unavailable to the general user. The ...


6

Matlab R2014b stores its recent files in: %APPDATA%\MathWorks\MATLAB\R2014b\MATLAB_Editor_State.xml It's a .xml file so it's easy to load and parse with xmlread. I'm not very familiar with xml parsing syntax, but here is how to get information about files (to be adapted to your needs of course): function [recentFiles] = GetRecentFiles() %[ % Opens ...


5

Another option (in addition to Amro's) is to use function handles: fileList = {@file1 @file2 @file3}; % A cell array of function handles for iFile = 1:numel(fileList) fileList{iFile}(); % Evaluate the function handle pause % Wait for a keypress to continue end You can call a function using its handle as I ...


5

Make another M-file and put all of the names of your 20 existing M-files in that. If you want them to run on startup, put them in startup.m in the startup directory (see doc startup). If they have systematic names, you can put the following in a loop: [y1, y2, ...] = feval(function, x1, ..., xn) where function is a string that you develop in the loop. ...


4

Bear with me, haven't done a lot of Matlab for some time now. But I would simply call your function iteratively: velocity = vi for t = 0:2:18 velocity = velocity+(9.8-c/m*(velocity))*2; end Then for each instance of t it would calculate velocity for a given initial velocity and update that value with it's new velocity. To have it take incremental ...


4

They enabled JIT (Just In Time Compilation), so every loop interprets once, runs several times. discussed here To check the difference, you can run this command: feature accel off This command would disables the JIT, then all commands would be interpreted even in the loops. You will see the difference ...


4

There is set of functionality that concerns itself with search path (documentation). What Is the MATLAB Search Path? The search path, or path is a subset of all the folders in the file system. MATLAB® software uses the search path to efficiently locate files used with MathWorks® products. MATLAB can access all files in the folders on the search path. ...


3

Check this link out, where guys also suggested using matlab-coder. I myself have experience creating a mex file from C code to be called by matlab code and that is pretty fast (I guess about the similar speed as standalone C code).


3

You define a cell array and store the desired variable in it. intermResults = cell(1,n); for j = 1:n; %n is a user input intermResults{j} = P*(1+i)^j; % each of these calculation I want to save end Afterwards you can access the value xx: desiredIntermResult = intermResults{xx} Btw. I didn't know MATLAB supports ++ operator. It doesn't. I changed ...


3

There are lots of ways, depending on what behaviour you want. MATLAB is a very flexible environment for this kind of stuff. If your files are in c:\work\myTwentyFiles, create a new file "runMyFiles.m" containing function runMyFiles() myDir = 'c:\work\myTwentyFiles'; d = dir([myDir filesep '*.m']); for jj=1:numel(d) try toRun = fullfile(myDir, ...


3

I am not sure that MatlabControl is what you need. It merely runs Matlab as server and sends it commands. You will not be able to give it to your users, unless they are all willing to pay for a Matlab installation. If you want to deploy your application, consider using Matlab Builder JA. From the website: MATLAB Builder™ JA enables you to create ...


3

Matlab is starting in its main directory and -r requires your function to be in quotation marks, thats why you get the error. And you need to change to your workspace first, the syntax is as follows: matlab -sd pathToYourWorkspace -r "function(parameters)" Maybe you also want to avoid the complete loading of the whole Matlab working environment, so add ...


3

Along the same lines as SCFrench's answer, but with a more C# style spin.. I would (and often do) make a class containing multiple static methods. For example: classdef Statistics methods(Static) function val = MyMean(data) val = mean(data); end function val = MyStd(data) val = std(data); end ...


2

You can use ' or " but not ” for string constants. I would recommend the first for compatibility with matlab.


2

I define multiple functions in one .m file with Octave and then use the command from within the .m file where I need to make use of the functions from that file: source("mycode.m"); Not sure if this is available with Matlab. octave:8> help source 'source' is a built-in function -- Built-in Function: source (FILE) Parse and execute the contents ...


2

As it has been a long time and nobody answered I will post what I did: In Matlab everytime you need a newtoolbox you link the path once and there stays "forever". You can use functions from the toolbox as if they were by default in Matlab. Using matlab engine this doesn't work that way so it is necessary to write the command line: % Here we load the ...


2

It depends on your code, see this link. If you've sufficiently optimized your code using vectorized operations, preallocated matrices, and converted divides to multiplies then the next step would be to run the profiler to see which parts of your code are taking up the most time and focus on those. I've found that splitting up my problem into batches and ...


2

You could also group functions in one main file together with the main function looking like this: function [varargout] = main( subfun, varargin ) [varargout{1:nargout}] = feval( subfun, varargin{:} ); % paste your subfunctions below .... function str=subfun1 str='hello' Then calling subfun1 would look like this: str=main('subfun1')


2

The usual workspace that you see is usually referred to as base workspace (see "base and function workspaces"). Then, any function has its own separate workspace, which means that either you explicitly return variables with an output argument: out = foo(in) ... or you can use assignin() in conjunction with a callback attached to a button to push the ...


2

The MATLAB documentation states that the name of the file and the function must be identical: Save the function code in a text file with a .m extension. The name of the file should match the name of the first function in the file. Valid function names begin with an alphabetic character, and can contain letters, numbers, or underscores. However, what ...


1

Using inputdlg is probably the easiest way for you to get your job done. ... % Initialization % Open a dialog box and wait for user to input two numbers. dlg_title = 'Input'; num_lines = 1; prompt = {'Input 1:','Input 2:'}; % label for each input def = {'10','20'}; % default values of each input answer = inputdlg(prompt, dlg_title, num_lines, def); % open ...


1

You can't get around it. In MATLAB you have to name the file with the name of the function. Any functions in that file that have a different name are private (not visible to any code other than the code inside that m-file).


1

Best practice is to write a function: function img( inputName, outputName ) if ~iscell(inputName) img( {inputName}, {outputName} ); return; end for ii = 1:numel(inputName) im = imread(inputName{ii}); ... [do operations on im] ... imwrite(im, outputName{ii}, 'tiff'); ...



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