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50

It all starts with the CPU or processor. Each processor type has a defined set of instructions it's able to perform. These instructions operate over ones and zeroes, which in turn represent whatever you wish them to: numbers, letters, even the instructions themselves. At the lowest level, a zero is determined by the presence of a certain voltage (usually ...


20

See if this helps.. http://www.classic-games.com/commodore64/64doc.html http://project64.c64.org/hw/c64.html http://www.amazon.com/Commodore-64-Programmers-Reference-Guide/dp/0672220563 I managed to snag a working Commodore 64 and a lot of assorted goodies (from someone who was giving it away for free) seeing it work even today was surreal. One of these ...


18

blt.w finish_29ABA ; \ cmpi.w #$16,d0 ; > These insns check that the index is in range bge.w finish_29ABA ; / add.w d0,d0 ; since the jump table contains words, ; multiply the index by 2, to get a word index move.w dword_29918(pc,d0.w),d0 ; get a word from the jump table, ...


16

A computer programming language is actually a highly abstracted language that is converted down into a very very basic language that computers actually understand. Basically, computers really only understand machine language, which is a basic language implemented in binary (1's and 0's). One level above this is assembly language, which is a very primitive ...


15

A compiled program usually contains a header followed by the actualy CPU instructions (what you might call "binary") + various other data. When you try to tell the OS to load your program the header will be read by the OS, and it is used to check that the executable file is really an executable file meant for this OS and this architecture. I.e. so that you ...


11

The opcode takes one byte, and the operands are in the following bytes. Check out the byte size column here, for instance.


10

The file is in 0 and 1, but when you open it with text editor those bits are grouped in bytes and then treated as text ;) In Linux you could try to disassemble the output file to ensure that it contains machine instructions (x86 architecture): objdump -D -mi386 a.out Example output: 1: 83 ec 08 sub $0x8,%esp 4: be 01 00 00 00 ...


9

Back in the day I was quite thrilled to find "Mapping the C64". I'm not sure how it compares to the other sources people have mentioned here—but it was far more useful and informative than the other books that stores seemed to be selling. Someone apparently typed it up by hand as a text file...now that's dedication. :)


9

A good book that talks about computers for non-engineers is 'Code' by Charles Petzold. I don't recall exactly if it covers exactly your question, but I think so. If you are interested enough to go farther it's a good choice.


9

Consider checking out the KickAssembler (written in Java) and do cross development: http://theweb.dk/KickAssembler/Main.php Its a great macro assembler with many c64 spesifics. A book worth checking out if you want to learn Assembly is "Machine Language by Jim Butterfield" one of the better books IMO. You can download it here: ...


8

Freescale (what Motorola's CPU-making arm has now become) has a free PDF copy here of the "M68000 FAMILY Programmer’s Reference Manual".


6

In the simplest case, a program called a compiler takes the programming language words you write and converts them to machine language which the computer can understand. Compilers understand a specific programming language (C#, Java, etc) which has very specific rules about how you explain to the compiler what you want it to do. Interpretation and ...


6

You can download the programmer's reference from Freescale: http://www.freescale.com/files/archives/doc/ref%5Fmanual/M68000PRM.pdf


6

This site may also be helpful. The C64 Programmers Reference already mentioned is a great resource. A text version of this book is available here. EDIT: I now see that the comment above also mentions an electronic version of the Programmers Reference. Another source, if you can get a hold of them, are old issues of computer magazines like Compute! from ...


6

The site called bombjack.org (named after a popular C-64 game) is a veritable gold mine of information and books and manuals on all aspects of Commodore programming and hardware. Go here and you will never be disappointed: http://www.bombjack.org/commodore/ BionicBub


6

Use objdump with the option -d for disassemble. Another useful option is -s to get a dump of the file. If for some reason -d does not work, you can also try -D, this forces objdump to disassemble the file even if it doesn't look like it contains machine code. Consult the manpage of objdump for more details. For example, to disassemble and dump a PE ...


6

movl %eax, %eax or mov eax, eax, depending on the assembler in use. see: Intel® 64 and IA-32 Architectures - Software Developer’s Manual, Volume 1, 3.4.1.1 : General-Purpose Registers in 64-Bit Mode. 32-bit operands generate a 32-bit result, zero-extended to a 64-bit result in the destination general-purpose register. I should also add, in regards to ...


5

In addition to what's already been mentioned: "Programming the Commodore 64" by Raeto Collin West seemed pretty comprehensive as I remember, but I have to admit I got the book at a point when I'd already learned most of what was in it from other sources. "The Commodore 64 ROMs revealed" by Nick Hampshire is a very useful reference book, but on its own it's ...


5

I found this site has an online version of the programmers reference manual and a heap of other links


5

I'm guessing English isn't your first language. I'll take my best guess at what you meant and keep my language simple. Not usually possible. Assembly is the closest thing that is well supported. The processor takes the machine code (intel, amd, etc.) Different processors have different machine code.


5

The key terms you're probably looking are: Instruction Latency Instruction Throughput These should be easy to google for. But basically, instructions take a certain number of cycles to execute (latency). But you can often execute multiple of them simultaneously (throughput). Do operations like set, read, move and compare all take the same time to ...


5

It's in some kind of executable file format. On Linux, it's probably ELF, on Mac OS X it's probably Mach-O, and so on. There's even an a.out format, but it's not that common anymore. It can't just be bare machine instructions - the operating system needs some information about how to load it, what dynamic libraries to attach to it, etc.


5

All that is saying is that machine code can directly write machine instructions to memory and jump to those instructions to execute them; this is the basis of many attack vectors to break into software, in fact. The point is, when you're writing machine code, it's easy to generate machine code. But when you're writing in a compiled language like C, you ...


5

A machine language can alter itself while running. The last assembly programming i did was for MS DOS and resident program that i used to run before testing other programs. When my program misbehaved a keystroke switched to the resident program and could peek into the running program and alter it directly before resuming. It was quite handy since I didn't ...


5

Source code and machine code are not the same. If you have "binutils" installed, you can use objdump: $ objdump --disassemble my-fantastic-program > my-fantastic-program.asm This will dump the assembly code of my-fantastic-program, and of course at this point it doesn't matter what language the program was written in. The part with > is using ...


4

Check ebay, I have regularly found similar official programming docs but for the Amiga, which I prefer to reminisce about over the C64 :)


4

Bravo! I'm an old-time, long-time ASM programmer and the last one to sneer at your very worthy project. I still know that the Z-80 opcode for CALL is really 0xC9 (or, as you might put it, 1100 1001). In my opinion, you will benefit from the exercise. I propose, though, that instead of starting with bits you start with assembly code. Then, when you get ...


4

The program runs on the CPU. The CPU has different levels of privilege, so called "privileged instructions" may only be executed by the kernel - that's how security is enforced by the operating system.


3

If you look into references like http://www.atarimax.com/jindroush.atari.org/aopc.html, you will see that each opcode has an encoding specified as: HEX LEN TIM The HEX is your 1-byte opcode. Immediately following it is LEN bytes of its argument. Consult the reference to see what those arguments are. The TIM data is important for emulators - it is the ...



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