Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Look at the solutions from the recently completed Kaggle Competition on Diabetic Retinopathy Detection. The problem seems to be similar to yours, image processing and identifying spots inside the images. This blog post by Top-10-finisher Jeffrey De Fauw has an excellent write-up and the python source code is available . This does not answer your ...


0

You are mixing symbolic and non-symbolic operations but this doesn't work. For example, T.eq returns a non-executable symbolic expression representing the idea of comparing two things for equality but it doesn't actually do the comparison there and then. T.eq actually returns a Python object that represents the equality comparison and since a non-None ...


2

Let's consider this test file: $ cat file Do I exist? I program. Therefore, I am! Suppose that we want to truncate this file to complete sentences of 20 characters or fewer: $ awk -v n=20 -v RS='[.?!]' '{if (length(s $0 RT)>n) exit; else s=s $0 RT;} END{print s;}' file Do I exist? If we want 30 characters or fewer: $ awk -v n=30 -v RS='[.?!]' '{if ...


0

I am not sure what problem you are trying to solve, but random forest and decision tree's might be a good place to start . You can also binarize the features as in the presence of a particular category means its true for that particular example. In case you are using python you can check out the following: http://scikit-learn.org/stable/modules/tree.html


0

Create some database your crawler will use. In that database, create some tables, like: concepts(concept_id, concept-name) categories(category_id, concept_id, category_name) Whenever you have a new concept (like 'browser_version' or 'country'), store it into the concepts table. Whenever you have a new category for a given concept, store it into the ...


0

Check if your data has character or factor variables and try to convert them to numerical.


0

Read up on the various strategies for cross-validation. A 10%-90% split is popular, as it arises from 10x cross-validation. But you could do 3x or 4x cross validation, too. (33-67 or 25-75) Much larger errors arise from: having duplicates in both test and train unbalanced data Make sure to first merge all duplicates, and do stratified splits if you ...


0

There is no one "right way" to split your data unfortunately, people use different values which are chosen based on different heuristics, gut feeling and personal experience/preference. A good starting point is the Pareto principle (80-20). Sometimes using a simple split isn't an option as you might simply have too much data - in that case you might need ...


0

You will see Precision/Recall results reported in academic papers as a aggregate, rather than 10,000 different P/R results. In that respect it gives the reader a very general sense of RS performance. Typically you will see Precision/Recall represented as a curve (as seen here: http://www.cs.washington.edu/ai/mln/images/image001.png). You tend to see that at ...


0

If I were you I would use Theano, not Caffe. Caffe is not programmed around a general-purpose matrix library so with Caffe you would be trying to use a screwdriver to open a beer basically. If you definitively feel like using C++ look into MrShadow or any other GPU-based matrix libraries. ... or simply use Theano with Python. I'm not a big fan of Python ...


0

Disclaimer: I'm with lejlot on this - you should get more data and more features instead of trying to remove features. Still, that doesn't answer your question, so here we go. Try most basic greedy approach - try removing each feature and retrain your ANN (several times, of course) and see if your results got better or worse. Choose this situation ...


0

The most likely scenario is that your training data does not have great predictive value. Given that you're attempting to "predict stock exchange direction", this shouldn't be surprising since that problem is kind of impossible to solve.


0

Is this curve even remotely possible or is my code necessarily flawed? It's possible, but not very likely. You might be picking the hard to predict instances for the training set and the easy ones for the test set all the time. Make sure you shuffle your data, and use 10 fold cross validation. Even if you do all this, it is still possible for it to ...


1

If you want to use raw pixels as features (as in the digits example) you need to resize / reshape / pad the images to have the same number of pixels for each image. Then you need to flatten each image to a single row, and stack them into an array. This will only work for very simple, aligned and normalized images.


0

pre-trained GloVe vectors do have punctuation, what makes you think they don't? At least Wikipedia 2014 + Gigaword 5 (6B tokens) set from http://nlp.stanford.edu/projects/glove/ have embeddings for "," ".", "-" and other included, just download these word vectors, and verify it yourseld, they are in plain text format, so its easy to do.


0

I have worked a bit with the word vectors used by Senna, and I am looking at the vocab list. http://ml.nec-labs.com/senna/ I definitely see entries for punctuation. A trick for handling numbers is to replace every digit with 0, and then learn a distribution for each pattern. For instance 1999 is mapped to 0000, 01-01-2015 is mapped to 00-00-0000, etc... ...


0

You can do a grid serarch over the 'regularazation' parameters to best match your target behavior. Parameters of interest: max depth number of features


1

It certainly is easier to generate a decision table from a decision tree, not the other way around. But the way I see it you could convert your decision table to a data set. Let the 'Disease' be the class attribute and treat the evidence as simple binary instance attributes. From that you can easily generate a decision tree using one of available decision ...


1

Gotta say that is an interesting question. I don't know the definitive answer, but I'd propose such a method: use Karnaugh map to turn your decision table to minimized boolean function turn your function into a tree Lets simplyify an example, and assume that using Karnaugh got you function (a and b) or c or d. You can turn that into a tree as: ...


1

I don't know that library, so I can't tell you if this is correctly implemented, but it looks legit. I think your problem lies with activation function - tanh(500)=1 and tanh(1)=0.76. This difference seem too small for me. Try using -1 instead of 500 for testing purposes and normalize your real data to something about [-2, 2]. If you need full real numbers ...


2

OK, let's start from the top. 1. How does k-NN works? You have base of n (k much smaller than n) points for which you know desired answer - you've probably obtained it from oracle. That set is called training set, as you provide it to virtual entity (k-NN classifier) so it can learn desired outcomes. By "point" we mean single example, described with ...


1

As you indicated in the comments, what is happening is that tag_train is a one dimensional array with length 2059 , whereas l2 is supposedly a 2 dimensional array with 2059 rows and 1 column. So when you try to do subtraction it leads to a 2 dimensional array with 2059 rows and 2059 columns. If you are 100% sure that l2 would only be one column then you ...


2

For boosting task you need to pick best classifier on each iteration of algorithm. To do so you need to minimize average error of stump on dataset with respect to weights, so you must take into account weights of objects while counting error measure of a classifier. Thus penalty of classifier for incorrect labeling of object with big weight will be bigger ...


0

It sounds like your Neural Net is not set up correctly. While there are many ways you could set it up, typically in a classification problem you have one output neuron for each possible class. In digit recognition that means one output neuron for each digit 0 through 9. (So you should have a total of ten output neurons) Each output neuron gives an output ...


2

These are completely equivalent approaches. The first one however is the preferable one, as working on logarithms of probabilities makes the whole process more numericaly stable. Results should be identical (up to numerical errors). However it appears that you have errors in second approach prob_dino *= p_w_given_dino does not use the fact, that you have ...


1

After some more reading I understand that scikit-learn implements a regularized logistic regression model, whereas glm in R is not regularized. Statsmodels GLM implementation gives identical results as in R. ...


0

It is totally ok and also common to also handle punctuation as single tokens for word vector generation. Also see for example word2vec papers. I assume that the prebuilt word2vec datasets have punctuations. And i'm sure the prebuilt glove vectors have also punctuations. The are a lot of tokenizers separating the punctuations as seperate word. One I know for ...


2

You have imported it as import pandas as pd and calling #pandas df = pandas.DataFrame(columns = ['Date','Unix','Ticker','DE Ratio']) You could either change import pandas as pd to import pandas or df = pandas.DataFrame(columns = ['Date','Unix','Ticker','DE Ratio']) to df = pd.DataFrame(columns = ['Date','Unix','Ticker','DE Ratio']). edit: ...


2

You imported pandas as pd. Either refer to it as such throughout, or remove the as pd from the import. (Plus, never ever ever do except Exception... pass. You'll swallow all sorts of errors and never know what they were. If you aren't going to handle them, don't catch them at all.)


1

You can use scikit's LabelBinarizer to convert the strings to one hot vectors. These have N zeros (where N is the number of unique strings) with a one at a single component. from __future__ import print_function from sklearn import preprocessing names = ["Barking And Dagenham", "Barnet", "Barnsley"] lb = preprocessing.LabelBinarizer() vectors = ...


2

You can't. The between-class scatter matrix is of rank at most n_classes - 1, thus there are at most n_classes - 1 directions that maximize the ratio of the between-class variance and the within- class variance. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linear_discriminant_analysis#Multiclass_LDA for more details.


0

Your question is how to select class index in Weka. First off, Let's see what class index is in here. My suggestion is to use function setClassIndex(int)


0

This is a workaround that may be worth trying. (Sorry that I do not have enough reputation to put it as a comment.) As sensitivity = TP/(TP + FN) specificity = TN/(TN + FP) ER = (TP + TN)/(TP + FN + TN + FP) (Notations from Sensitivity_and_specificity) If you duplicate some positive/negative samples (or increase the weights), the ER will approximate ...


0

n_samples is the number of images. n_features is the image data itself. You have to create a matrix with the shape (number of images x number of image points), then pass to the classifier. You have to resize all of your images to a constant, same size like say 256x256 or 128x128, or 96x96 or any size which is suitable to extract relevant information from ...


1

First of all 40 inputs is a very small space and it should not be reduced. Large number of inputs is 100,000, not 40. Also, 600x40 is not a big dataset, nor the one "increasing the CPU time dramaticaly", if it learns slowly than check your code because it appears to be the problem, not your data. Furthermore, feature selection is not a good way to go, you ...


1

rnn.sentence_train is Theano function that has updates=sentence_updates. This means that on each call to rnn.sentence_train all of the shared variables in the sentence_updates dictionary's keys will be updated according to the symbolic update expressions in the corresponding sentence_updates dictionary values. Those expressions are all classical gradient ...


1

I followed the instructions given at https://scivision.co/anaconda-python-opencv3/ This worked for me


0

You can create a simple website which allows users to upload images. Once the image is uploaded the servlet will pass on the image or its location to your application. Once that your application is done, you could redirect the user to a results page (something along the lines of response.sendRedirect("simpleList.do")). Spring is one such technology you could ...


0

When normalizing stream data you need to use the statistical properties of the train set. During streaming you just need to cut too big/low values to a min/max value. There is no other way, it's a stream, you know. But as a tradeoff, you can continuously collect the statistical properties of all your data and retrain your model from time to time to adapt ...


0

you can only perform dimensionality reduction in an unsupervised manner OR supervised but with different labels than your target labels. For example you could train a logistic regression classifier with a dataset containing 100 topics. the output of this classifier (100 values) using your training data could be your dimensionality reduced feature set.


0

You need to train a binary classifier for each class. Train set should contain data with target class and other arbitrary data not matching the target class.


1

As of Lucene 5.2.1, you can use indexed documents to classify new documents. Out of the box, Lucene offers a naive Bayes classifier, a k-Nearest Neighbor classifier (based on the MoreLikeThis class) and a Perceptron based classifier. The drawback is that all of these classes are marked with experimental warnings and documented with links to Wikipedia.


0

There are two types of summarization: extractive and abstractive. Extractive summarization methods simplify the problem of summarization into the problem of selecting a representative subset of the sentences in the original documents. Abstractive summarization may compose novel sentences, unseen in the original sources. Various machine learning ...


0

RandomForestClassifier does not yet have a coef_ attrubute, but it will in the 0.17 release, I think. However, see the RandomForestClassifierWithCoef class in Recursive feature elimination on Random Forest using scikit-learn. This may give you some ideas to work around the limitation above.


1

In Java arrays are reference types. int[] arr = { 8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,8}; int[] b = arr; b [0] = -10; for (int i:arr) { System.out.print (' '); System.out.print (i); } outputs -10 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 8 So i mean that you incorrectly creating arrays double[] theta_pos = theta; double[] theta_neg = theta; they are just references to theta, and by changing ...


0

This is probably less than perfect solution, but it might be enough to get you started. The first part relies on a small modification of the find_peaks function from the gazetools package. find_maxima <- function(x, threshold) { ranges <- find_peak_ranges(x, threshold) peaks <- NULL if (!is.null(ranges)) { for (i in 1:nrow(ranges)) { ...


1

I assume that the numLeft is computed using leftRDD.count() and counting is an action and will force the computation of all the dependent RDDs. You will actually make more than once the filtering in this case, once for the count and another time for each children dependence. You should cache your RDD to avoid double computation and you only need the last ...


0

It seems it is a known bug here which has been fixed, I guess you should try update sklearn.


0

Managed to solve it: The manually uploaded dataset was formatted in Azure with "String features" only. (Because there where some NA's studio ML formats them this way). The R script however, formats the NA's differently and thus the columns as well. I'm not entirely sure what caused the different results because the data was character-wise identical. Only ...


1

Well it depends on what problem you have at hand, but the idea is that your output should be as close as possible to the test dataset output, so I suggest comparing that. For example, if this is a classification task, your output will be iterable and you should be able to work out what the selected output class is and compare it to the target. You can the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included