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10

The basic mistakes This macro is wrong, because it should not be a macro: (defmacro make-accessor-field (name form) `(,name :initarg ,(make-keyword name) :initform ,form :accessor ,name)) Macro forms should expand into code. This macro expands a form into a list used for a slot description. A slot description is not code, but a part of the ...


8

"Nothing" (no text) is a valid replacement text for a macro. It will simply be removed (more precisely, replaced by nothing) by the preprocessor. There are multiple reasons why you'd use something like this. One is to simply use the macro in #ifdef and similar constructrs. Another is conditional compilation. A typical use case is public APIs and DLL ...


8

The classic example is a macro to calculate the maximum of two value: #define MAX(a, b) ((a) > (b) ? (a) : (b)) Now lets "call" the macro like this: int x = 5; int y = 7; int z = MAX(x++, y++); Now if MAX was a normal function, we would expect that x and y would be incremented once, right? However because it's a macro the "call" is replaced like ...


6

macro_rules! is both cleverer and dumber than you might realise. Initially, all input to a macro begins life as undifferentiated token soup. An Ident here, StrLit there, etc. However, when you match and capture a bit of the input, generally the input will be parsed in an Abstract Syntax Tree node; this is the case with expr. The "clever" bit is that when ...


3

#define bla simply defines bla. you can use it with #ifdef bla ... place some code here ... #endif a typical use case is #define DEBUG to enable special code parts in debugging mode. Another way to set such things from "outside" is: g++ -DDEBUG x.cpp which also sets the macro DEBUG defined. And every header file should have something like: ...


3

This is part of a macro definition. call is a macro parameter, presumably the name of a function. The # operator turns its operand into a string. So #call is a string with the name of the function. Adjacent strings are concatenated, so the name will be combined with "MPI error calling \"" and "\"\n" and output on cerr. The # operator is part of the C/C++ ...


3

The expansion of this preprocessor macro: #define offsetof(type, member) ((size_t) &((type *)0)->member) Results in the following formal definition: The offsetof a given member on a given type is the casting to size_t of the address of the member member for the type located at the null pointer address. Or, in other words, this is black magic that ...


3

Replace your: #define SWAP(t,x,y) \ ( t type = x; x = y; y = type; ) with #define SWAP(t,x,y) \ do { t type = x; x = y; y = type; } while (0) and change the call: swap(int, x, y); to SWAP(int, x, y); A few notes in your macro definition: you cannot have the blank line after the \ and also () can only be used between expressions and not between ...


3

tl;dr Answer The utility of SAS Macro, or of a text preprocessor in general, is to support constructions that would be cumbersome to write directly in the generated language. Details SAS Macro is a text preprocessor. It is similar in role to CPP within C/C++; M4 within several Unix utilities; Python- and Ruby-based template languages within HTML; etc. ...


3

You should never #define a keyword such as private. If you include any part of the standard library from the same .cpp file (even the parts needed for basic language features like <new> or <initializer_list>), the behavior is undefined. That said, when #if evaluates its expression, any identifier or keyword token is treated as the number zero. ...


3

You can use the macro to pass the string to a constexpr function which does the "encryption." Since C++14, constexpr is much easier to use. // Similar to std::array, but with a member pointer as an accessor. // It's complicated. template< std::size_t length > struct string_holder { char str[ length ]; char const * ptr = str; }; template< ...


3

You could create a macro that doesn't really do anything, but use the macro as a "marker" for a custom build step (simple script might do it) to obfuscate the strings prior to the preprocessor getting the source code.


2

I would recommend using conditional compilation flags for something like this. See https://doc.rust-lang.org/book/conditional-compilation.html In your case, it might look something like this: #[cfg(feature = "feature_a")] macro_rules! use_macro { ($identifier:ident) => { println!("A: {}", stringify!($identifier)); } } #[cfg(feature = ...


2

Side Effects can be defined as: Evaluation of an expression produces something and if in addition there is a change in the state of the execution environment it is said that the expression (its evaluation) has some side effect(s). For example: int x = y++; //where y is also an int In addition to the initialization operation the value of y gets ...


2

To put it simply a side effect is a write to an object or a read of a volatile object. So an example of a side effect: i++; Here is a use of a side effect in a macro: #define MAX(a, b) ((a) > (b)) ? (a) : (b)) int a = 42; int b = 1; int c; c = MAX(a, b++); The danger is contrary to a function where the arguments are passed by value you are ...


2

try this #define S_(x) #x #define S(x) S_(x) #define MY_NUMBER 3 #define MY_STRING "the number three: " S(MY_NUMBER)


1

Macros operate at compile time, not at run time. They can perform a variety of text-mangling tricks, but they do not evaluate anything. (They can certainly, however, expand to code that evaluates something.) Putting the formatted value of variable i into a string involves evaluating i; no macro can do this. You could instead expand the scope of the macro ...


1

Somewhat dirty but should work: #include <stdio.h> #define DYNFORMAT(n, i) (i>0) ?"%+d%s%d\n" :"%+d%s%s\n", n, (i>0) ?"^" :"", (i>0) ?i :"" int main(void) { int i = 0; printf(DYNFORMAT(42, i)); i = 1; printf(DYNFORMAT(42, i)); } This should print: +42 +42^1 Disclaimer: I am not sure whether this conforms to the Standard and ...


1

the preprocessor processes it, removing it and replacing it with nothing could be a variety of reasons, including readability, portability, custom compiler features, etc.


1

Java supports an object-oriented programming paradigm. This allows you to use classes, methods, etc, to control the program flow and achieve the equivalent of basic programming structures such as loops, if-then logic etc... I'm not 100% sure what name has been assigned to the programming paradigm SAS uses, I guess I'd call it a sequential language, as the ...


1

The accepted answer is problematic because it breaks when type parameters are involved, or when support for non-nominal types should be included. I updated the example using two alternatives for a more concise notation for the list of types, while still allowing syntax for actual types. import haxe.macro.Expr; using haxe.macro.Tools; class Thing { ...


1

You need parenthesis around your macro: #define SWAP(t,x,y) \ { \ t type = x; x = y; y = type; \ } and it's case sensitive. So your macro invocation should be: SWAP(int, x, y); Having said that, I would make swap an inline function as opposed to a macro.


1

In case anyone is in need for answers, I got this Thanks to ousado on the Haxe IRC chat: If you do it in macro alone you can do this: var ct = macro : pack.age.SomeTypename; var tp = switch ct { case TPath(tp):tp; case _: throw "nope"; } var expr = macro new $tp(); ..or, if you explicitly construct tp: var tp = ...


1

#define SWAP(t,x,y) \ ( t type = x; x = y; y = type; ) You have an extra blank line. Get rid of it. But, that will just give you more errors to fix later when you use the macro SWAP, since you cannot use parentheses like that. The do {} while(0) idiom is useful for defining an inlined scope. #define SWAP(t,x,y) do { t tmp = x; x = y; y = tmp; } while(0) ...


1

You have at least three separate problems with your code: The code you intend as the macro replacement value is instead at top level because you interpose a blank line between the #define and the replacement text. That soaks up the line-joining backslash. You have a full semicolon-terminated statement inside parentheses (actually several). Parentheses ...



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