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7

As a follow-up to Slava's answer, you can use member pointers... as template arguments ! template <unsigned char RGBTriple::*Tchannel> compute_disperse(/* Whatever you need */) { error = ((int)(currentPixel->*Tchannel)) - palette.table[index].*Tchannel; /* ... */ } Least typing possible, flexible, and fully inlined by any decent compiler. ...


6

If you can live with a comma separated argument list then you could follow the style used in shapeless's HList companion object apply method, scala> import shapeless._ import shapeless._ scala> object MyThingy { | def describe[P <: Product, L <: HList](p : P) | (implicit gen: Generic.Aux[P, L]) : L = gen.to(p) | } defined ...


6

There is no portable way for a function to know its caller in C. But you’re right, a macro works: #define smart_log(...) ( printf("[%s]: ", __func__) , printf(__VA_ARGS__) ) __func__ is defined (C99/C11 6.4.2.2 p.1) as if, immediately following the opening brace of each function definition, the declaration static const char __func__[] = ...


5

The correct macro will look like #define mod(a,b) ( ( a ) > ( b ) ? ( a ) - ( b ) : ( b ) - ( a ) )


5

If you want a macro that expands to a statement, the do/while(0) trick is the way to go. But it's more flexible, when possible, to have a macro that expands to an expression. If you want to use it in a statement context, just add a semicolon: #define SWAP(a, b) ( (a)^=(b), (b)^=(a), (a)^=(b) ) The problem with your original macro, or rather with the way ...


4

just put all the #ifedfs outside the function call and use them to define some literal strings. Example: #ifdef _RELEASE #define VERSION "RELEASE" #else #define VERSION "DEBUG" #endif ... LOG(VERSION); ...


4

Macros perform textual substitutions. As a result, when they get "pasted" into code, unexpected side effects can occur. You want to wrap your arguments in parentheses to get the correct result. i.e: #define mod(a,b) ( ( a ) > ( b ) ? ( a ) - ( b ) : ( b ) - ( a ) ) This ensures that whatever is substituted for a and b are correctly "grouped".


3

Yes, you can, since: Macros are the analogue of functions for expression generation at compile time. Just as functions map a tuple of argument values to a return value, macros map a tuple of argument expressions to a returned expression. Macros are invoked with the following general syntax: @name expr1 expr2 ... @name(expr1, expr2, ...) Here's ...


3

The two macros are different when dealing with threaded forms that take further arguments. Try these for size: (macroexpand '(->> 1 (a b) (c d e) (f g h i))) (macroexpand '(-> 1 (a b) (c d e) (f g h i)))


3

Off-the-cuff implementation since I only have a minute: import scala.reflect.macros.Context import scala.language.experimental.macros case class Conditional(conditionCode: String, value: Boolean) { def THEN(doIt: Unit) = macro Conditional.THEN_impl } object Conditional { def sourceCodeOfCondition: String = ??? def IF(condition: Boolean) = macro ...


3

If you are satisfied with having one list of classes, you can use the following trick: #define MY_CLASSES X(ClassA) X(ClassB) X(ClassC) Then you can do something like: #define X(a) a::allocate(); MY_CLASSES #undef X To do something else, you can do: #define X(a) a::init(); MY_CLASSES #undef X


3

I'm going to respectfully disagree with Miles a bit here. I personally can't stand auto-tupling, and if you want to use -Xlint in your project, the solution in his answer is going to cause a lot of warning noise. I definitely agree that you should avoid macros when there's a viable alternative, but if I had to choose between auto-tupling and a macro in a ...


3

Defining keyword-like macros just for improving code readablity I think its acceptable. But like Marco said, its fairly subjective. I think an example of a macro enhancing readability is C++ and NOTHROW. Oddly, specifying throw() means a function does not throw; and opposed to throw (SomeException), which means a function could throw an exception. ...


3

You can write code that will write code for you. This can be done in two ways: First, your program can create new code as a list and pass it to the eval function, which will evaluate the new code at runtime (however, eval is something you should not abuse -- actually, it should be used seldomly, when you really need it). You could theoretically do this in ...


3

I don't think that's possible, C does not have any introspection at that level built in. The classic approach is to add runtime type information to the structures, e.g. have typedef enum { StructType_A, StructType_B } StructType; then add one of those to very beginning of each structure: struct A { StructType type; ... }; Now you can write a ...


3

Maybe with X Macros? #define structAFields \ X(char, a1, ) \ X(short, a2, ) \ X(void*, a3, ) \ X(int, a4, ) \ X(void*, a5, ) \ #define X(A, B, C) A B C; struct A { structAFields }; #undef X #define X(A, B, C) if(strcmp(#A, "void*") == 0) *((void **)((void *)(&a->B))) = malloc(2); void mallocA(struct A * a) { ...


2

Obvious solution would be to pass pointer to member unsigned char RGBTriple::*channel but I bet that would have perfomance issues. I would use template instead: enum ChannelName { R, G, B }; template <ChannelName> unsigned char &getChannel( RGBTriple &rgb ); template <> unsigned char &getChannel<R>( RGBTriple &rgb ) { ...


2

This will sample and place the samples in column B Public Sub scramble(InOut() As String) Dim I As Long, J As Long, Low As Long, Hi As Long Dim Temp ReDim Helper(LBound(InOut) To UBound(InOut)) As Double Randomize Low = LBound(Helper) Hi = UBound(Helper) For I = Low To Hi Helper(I) = Rnd() Next J = (Hi - Low + 1) \ 2 Do While J > 0 For I = Low ...


2

You could use a variadic function template : #include <iostream> // Thanks to Jarod42 for improving it ! template <class... TClasses> void allocateAll() { std::initializer_list<int>{(TClasses::allocate(), void(), 0)...}; } struct C1 { static void allocate() { std::cout << "allocated C1\n"; } }; struct C2 { static void ...


2

When you see this kind of error the first thing to try is un-typechecking code that you're "reusing" in your macro output. In this case replacing the following: val retVal = { $block } With: val retVal = { ${ c.untypecheck(block) } } Should do the trick. Note that in 2.10 the equivalent of untypecheck was resetAllAttrs / resetLocalAttrs. If you ...


2

Try these steps Copy the sheets inside the existing file. Copy then paste values all info in the newly copied sheet (in the existing file) Move the newly copied (and newly pasted values) sheet to a new file.


2

As stated your macros don't enhance readability. Somebody may be wondering what BLOCK or IMPLICIT means, thinking they perform some special function, when in fact they do not. It seems better suited for a comment or refactoring. In IDEs like Visual Studio, you have the ability to fold lines of code (hide/show them) or to group them into documentation blocks ...


2

Here is defn2: (require '[clojure.tools.macro :as ctm]) (defmacro defn2 "A clone of `defn`." [name & defn-args] (let [[name body] (ctm/name-with-attributes name defn-args)] `(defn ~name ~(meta name) ~@body))) An example expansion: (require '[clojure.pprint :refer [pprint]]) (pprint (macroexpand-1 '(defn2 ^:private add ...


2

This is very system/compiler dependent as the exact incantation to get the function name depends very much on the compiler. For Visual C++, you'd use the macro __FUNCTION__ to get the current function name at compile time. In order to make sure you get the correct function name logged without putting the macro into every invocation of smart_log, you can ...


2

If you don't want to use macros you can use the stack for that. The smart_log function will be just on top of the funtion that called it. See How can one grab a stack trace in C?


2

I have a suspicion that the semi-colon at the end of curly braces is causing the problem That's exactly right! If you put a semicolon after a block with curly braces, that would be a new, empty, statement after the if. The compiler will parse it like this: if (x < 0) // The "if" { // The body of the "if" x^=y ; y^=x ; ...


2

If you really want to skip cells containing formulas, you could use this example as a start. The code assumes that only formulas start with an equals sign. Edit: expanding the example with the ranges in the question. Sub example() Dim source As Range Dim target As Range Set source = ActiveSheet.Range("A1:B6") Set target = ...


2

ThisWorkbook.Activate should do the trick. Judging by your macro, paste it after your "' select current workbook and paste the values starting at U4" comment.


1

You can only combine two preprocessor tokens. However, func isn't a preprocessor token. You need to jump through an extra hoop, calling some form of "concat" macro: #define CONCAT(a, b) a ## b #define macro(a) CONCAT(func,a) Of course, the tokens produced by you macro won't be func1, ..., func31 (of course, they would also need to start with func0 if your ...


1

I'm not completely sure why this works now, but all I did to change my code was add into the loop a clear filter command for the "Date" field. So now my code has this loop instead for making the date and shift change for all the pivot tables based on a cell value I enter manually, just once For Each PT In ActiveSheet.PivotTables ...



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