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4

So this is the old "paste happens before evaluation of macro arguments", so you get test__COUNTER__ instead of test0. You need to do a nested macro: #define expandedjoin(x,y) x##y #define join(x, y) expandedjoin(x, y) (The rest of your code gives lots of errors because you are passing a void function to cout, which isn't good) Complete working code: ...


4

Add a no-op expression to the macro: #define DECLARE_FOO(var) \ int _##var##_a = 0; \ int _##var##_b = 0; \ (void) 0 BTW: this will even fail if the macro is used without a semicolon. UPDATE: another trick: make the last line of the macro an external declaration (which also is a no-op, but will choke without a semicolon) #define ...


4

Given your definition the text if is part of the macro contents. quietly reg y x1 x2 x3 local subset if e(sample) list Unit `subset' reg y x1 x2 if `subset' So the list command works because it is interpreted as list Unit if e(sample) but the regress command is not working because it is interpreted as regress y x1 x2 if if e(sample) and Stata ...


3

Your immediate problem is that you have a double if. The local macro `subset' contains the string "if e(sample)", so when Stata is interpreting the line: reg y x1 x2 if `subset' it reads: reg y x1 x2 if if e(sample) The more important problem is that this method is very fragile as the contents of e(sample) will be overwritten by every estimation ...


2

Use the preprocessor! Using the Boost.Preprocessor library: #include <boost/preprocessor.hpp> #define BOOST_PP_LOCAL_MACRO(n) \ template<> struct MyClass<n, 1> { \ constexpr int mode() { return BOOST_PP_CAT(BOOST_PP_CAT(MODE_, n), _A); } }; \ template<> struct MyClass<n, 2> { \ constexpr int mode() { ...


2

CUBE(++x) expands to ++x * ++x * ++x. Might be better to define this as an inlined function rather than a define. Something like: inline int CUBE( int x ) { return x * x * x; } http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Inline.html


2

Macros are just textual replacement. Think about what your macro invocation will produce: int y = CUBE(++x); // becomes int y = (++x*++x*++x); Modifying a variable more than once between sequence points is undefined behavior (look up "sequence points" for the details). Undefined behavior means that the behavior cannot be relied upon. This is one of the ...


2

You should refactor your code before you write any more. EDIT: made a few changes after testing: 'These go in the relvant worksheet code module Sub ListBox1_Change() Handle_Change Me, "ListBox1", "TextBox1", "B" End Sub Sub ListBox2_Change() Handle_Change Me, "ListBox2", "TextBox2", "C" End Sub 'This goes in a *regular* code module Sub ...


2

As to the macro written It looks like you are missing some unquotes in your macro definition. I don't use that library and you didn't provide an SSCCE, so I am advising without testing. You macro should likely be (defmacro wrap-publish [default-exchange-name content mType data] `(doseq [datum# ~data] (lb/publish ~'ch ~'ex ~default-exchange-name ...


2

You can't do this directly, but you can if you move the macros to a separate location (such as a separate file): macros.hpp MACRO(1, Connect) MACRO(2, Timeout) #undef MACRO the other file struct Error { #define MACRO(a, b) static const int b = a; #include "macros.hpp" const char * const name [] = { #define MACRO(a, b) #b, #include ...


2

Use something like this: target_compile_definitions(myproj PRIVATE $<$<CONFIG:Debug>:MY_DEBUG_MACRO>) http://www.cmake.org/cmake/help/v3.0/manual/cmake-generator-expressions.7.html http://www.cmake.org/cmake/help/v3.0/command/target_compile_definitions.html http://www.cmake.org/cmake/help/v3.0/manual/cmake-buildsystem.7.html This works with ...


2

Here's a Boost.Preprocessor solution: #include <boost/preprocessor/seq/for_each.hpp> #include <boost/preprocessor/seq/size.hpp> #include <boost/preprocessor/tuple/elem.hpp> #include <boost/preprocessor/stringize.hpp> #define FIRST(a, b) a #define SECOND(a, b) b #define DECLARE_VAR(r, data, elem) \ static const int ...


2

This worked for me: Sub Sort_Compiled_Data_Sheet() Dim sht as worksheet Set sht = ActiveWorkbook.Worksheets("Compiled_Data") sht.Activate With sht.ListObjects("Compiled_Data").Sort .SortFields.Clear .SortFields.Add Key:=Range("Compiled_Data[Date]"), SortOn:=xlSortOnValues, _ ...


2

For the FCMP try with CATS(), you need to add an ATTRIB statement for the result variable. FCMP handles character variables slightly differently from the Data Step. proc fcmp outlib=work.funcs.funcs; function delimit_words(iString $) $; length result $200; result = cats("'",tranwrd(cats(compbl(iString))," ", "','"),"'"); return (result ...


2

With GCC you can define so-called bit fields and manipulate them like struct members: struct flagsByte { unsigned int powerOn: 1; /* single bit */ }; flagsByte.powerOn = 0; flagsByte.powerOn = 1; Building upon this, it is possibile to define a couple of trivial macros, reminiscent of Assembly: #define bsf(X) flagsByte.(X) = 1 #define bcf(X) ...


2

Here's a set of macros closely matching your assembly example: #define powerOn 0 #define someotherfield 1 #define BITMASK(field) (1u << (field)) #define SET(field) do { flagsByte |= BITMASK(field); } while(0) #define CLR(field) do { flagsByte &= ~BITMASK(field); } while(0) #define TEST(field) (flagsByte & BITMASK(field)) /* Use ...


2

You do this with a second expansion. ~/sandbox/20$ cat >t.c #define BITSET_INNER(a,b) a |= (1<<b) #define BITSET(spec) BITSET_INNER(spec) #define f1 flagword,3 BITSET(f1) ~/sandbox/20$ cc -E t.c # 1 "t.c" # 1 "<command-line>" # 1 "/usr/include/stdc-predef.h" 1 3 4 # 1 "<command-line>" 2 # 1 "t.c" flagword |= (1<<3) ...


2

Personally, I prefer the bit-field syntax, and without macros since my flags are almost always inside structs anyway. However, if you insist on writing assembler in C, here's how: /* We need to indirect the macro call so that the pair of arguments get expanded */ #define BITSET_(f,i) do{f|= 1<<(i);}while(0) #define BITCLR_(f,i) ...


1

What you want, is to have a single list, that will automatically generate the definition and the name list, correct? If so, search for X Macros in google. Example: #define EXPAND_AS_DEFINITION(a, b) static const int b = a; #define EXPAND_AS_ARRAY(a, b) #b, #define STATE_TABLE(ENTRY) \ ENTRY(1, Connect) \ ENTRY(2, Timeout) struct Error { ...


1

To define Macro in the different file can be done by following ways: 1) You can define Macro in any other .h file. and include the file in .cpp file. This can help you to define Macro in different file To check the Macro for Debug and Release version use _Debug or _Release Macro. 2) Another way to do this is By using the way told by @Soren. ...


1

Man g++ http://linux.die.net/man/1/g++ Look for the -D option for defining macros and you can configure your makefiles to set that option http://www.cmake.org/Wiki/CMake_Useful_Variables set(CMAKE_CXX_FLAGS "-g -Wall -Dxxxx")


1

I'm going to assume that 'M101' for example is not a cell but rather a value in a column. Some googling of what my pseudocode solution below will set you on the right track if I have assumed correctly... for (column): if (currentCell is highlighted) then currentCell.value = currentCell.one_up.value


1

Stay away from macros. C++ provides type-safe replacements for almost all standard usages of macros. For your case, where you want a min and max function for every type T, express this as a template: template<typename T> T const& min(T const& x, T const& y) { return (x < y) ? (x) : (y); } template<typename T> T const& ...


1

I would use something like this: Sub Example() Dim arr, res Dim Variable as String arr = Array(Array("Option1", "Name1"), _ Array("Option2", "Name2"), _ Array("Option3", "Name3"), _ Array("Option4", "Name4")) res = Application.VLookup(Combobox1.Value, arr, 2, 0) If Not IsError(res) Then ...


1

For this, I would do compile-time reflection coupled with polymorphism. (defprotocol FieldSettable (set-field! [this k v])) (defmacro extend-field-setter [klass] (let [obj (with-meta (gensym "obj_") {:tag klass}) fields (map #(symbol (.getName ^java.lang.reflect.Field %)) (-> klass str (java.lang.Class/forName) ...


1

OK, I think I got it. Instead of .Activate, we'll just set the book if it's already open. We'll also reference the book by its file name, NOT path (as I had erroneously suggested in a comment above). This worked for me: Sub copydata() Dim wkbSource As Workbook Dim wkbDest As Workbook Dim shttocopy As Worksheet Dim wbname As String ' check if the file is ...


1

Yes. Just specify the return type as Any and make your macro whitebox (http://docs.scala-lang.org/overviews/macros/blackbox-whitebox.html#blackbox_and_whitebox_macros). Whitebox macro expansions assume their actual type, not the declared type of the macro definition.


1

Based on the discussion here, and the link to this MSKB article, it sounds like the error you're seeing may be a result of the underscores in your macro names. This only seems to apply to Excel '97, though. If that's the version you're on, take out the underscores and see if the error goes away.


1

I've re-written your code and just provide comments in there. There's just too many to fit in the comment. Here's the GetxlsxFiles Sub: It's actually brief if you remove the comments which explains what I did. Sub GetxlsxFiles() Dim wb As Workbook, wbTemp As Workbook Dim Path As String, Filename As String ', masterWB As String Dim Sheet As ...


1

The issue you are going to have is with 32/64 bit compatibility. Office 2003 is 32-bit only; starting with Office 2007, some versions are 64-bit. Microsoft has a pretty good writeup of the issues on this page.



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