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5

A prime example of a generic sort is the C runtime library qsort(). One of its most versatile attributes is that it makes use of a "comparison function" which is passed as a parameter. Why not adopt that tactic? While it is true that most comparison functions are trivial, in the case of accessing objects it is invaluable for interpreting what is inside ...


4

Yes, the new definition overrides all previous. But there is corresponding warning message. With #undef you have no warnings.


4

Since you haven't provided any motivation for using a macro, the better solution might be to avoid it altogether: printf("%s", test); Edit Since you want to print something, you can do this: printf("/home/%s/log", test);


3

Macro variables have a 'scope', either local or globally. Macro variables initialised for the first time within a macro, are local in scope by default. This means you can't resolve the value outside of the macro. You can either a) define the macro variable outside of the macro initially, or b) specify it as %GLOBAL within the macro. %MACRO MYMACRO ; ...


3

This might be what you need #define BitMap_getMask(range) \ (((~(unsigned int) 0 >> (31 - (range).max + (range).min)) << (range).min)) #define BitMap_get(x, range) \ ((x) & BitMap_getMask(range)) #define awesome \ ((struct {int min; int max;}){4, 6}) the error was due to the expansion of {4, 6}.


3

You just need to move use libc::c_int to the inner mod declaration because uses are only valid inside the module they are used: mod nif_versions { use libc::c_int; include!(concat!(env!("OUT_DIR"), "/nif_versions.snippet")); }


3

When range is expanded to {4,6} and passed to BitMap_getMask, what you're getting is BitMap_getMask({4,6}) which is 2 arguments, whereas BitMap_getMask expects 1 argument. Furthermore, the pre-processor only does text replacement for these macros. It is unaware of type. It will replace every instance of text "range" with text "{4,6}" so you don't have a ...


2

What you need to do is generate the C equivalent of C++'s template functions using generics. This is usually a combination of function pointers and re-casting void* data to achieve the desired result. The qsort() function does just this. Included below is a code listing and sample run from a similar answer of mine from some time back that shows you how to ...


2

why do it if you can guarantee getting memory. Your assumption is wrong. malloc() calloc() and realloc() might fail. So when the memory requested by you is not successfully allocated then these functions retrun NULL. If this check is not there then you go ahead and start writing to this memory location which is not allocated which causes undefined ...


2

Calling add_definitions(-DMACRO1=1) simply adds this definition to your compiler's command-line. Its value is equivalent to a #define directive in your source code. It does not create a CMake variable. So, in your case,${MACRO1} evaluates to the empty string, resulting in ADD_DEFINITIONS(-DMACRO3=) To make it work, use SET(...) to define the variable in ...


2

You should use g++ instead of gcc in the command, because gcc doesn't link to the C++ STL by default, and hence it gives an undefined reference to std::ios_base. g++ -Wall -DDEEPAK factorial.cpp -o main


2

You can "create a macro through a macro" (OPs words) through the VBIDE. To so so, add a reference to Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications Extensibility. You can then write code to read and write to your VBA application. You will also need to set Trust access to the VBA project object model in the trust Center. That said, there may be better ways to ...


2

Yes #define STR(a) (a) int main() { char *test = "printtest"; printf("%s", STR(test)); } in your macro you are stringifying the argument with the # token stringizing operator.


2

#define STR(a) #a makes argument (in your case a) a string literal. If you do #blah, it will create string "blah". so, when you are saying STR(test) you are just asking for a string "test". test is already string with the value "printtest" - you do not need STR(test) around it to get string value. What are you trying to achieve with STR(test)? ...


2

You can use SOLVER in excel to get the result. You can activate it in ADD-INS and it should show up in DATA tab. You set up your spreadsheet like this: In one column You have list of numbers You want to check Next column is all zeroes (0) Third column is First*Second (for example 100 * 0) so in the beginning its zero for all rows Than You add summary of ...


2

Your macro has smart quotes in (“, ”) not real quotes ("). Also, as a matter of good practice, put a bracket round the definition, and x, e.g.: #define GET_RED_TEXT(x) ("\x1B[31m" (x) "\x1B[00m")


1

Well, it is possible to do it by relying on the automatic concatenation of adjoining string literals: #define XSTR(a) "/home/" a "/log" int main() { #define test "user1" printf("%s", XSTR(test)); #undef test } This will resolve to int main() { printf("%s", "/home/" "user1" "/log")); Which in turn resolves to int main() { printf("%s", ...


1

Can't be done with the preprocessor, since it is not possible for a macro to expand to a set of preprocessor directives (#if, #define, etc). And that's what would be needed to do what you seek.


1

Edit: Okay after reading Chris J's answer I realized what the problem actually was :). Anyway I will leave this code here because it's simpler and much more effecient way to do the thing you want. In your code you need to call proc sql n times where n is the number of observations. In fact you need only one datastep and no macro at all. See step 1 below: ...


1

Help is on the way. You can paste this function into a module and adjust it to your needs. Function GetCombination(CoinsRange As Range, SumCellId As Range) As String Dim Nb As Integer Dim Com As String Dim Sum As Double Dim r As Range Set r = CoinsRange Sum = SumCellId.Value For Each cell In r.Cells If Sum / cell.Value >= 1 Then Com = Com & Int(Sum ...


1

Please try to use Is operator (object comparison): If rangeObject.Worksheet Is ActiveSheet Then ' (... your code ...) End If


1

You appear to have copied the code from some place and the double quotes are not valid try this #define GET_RED_TEXT(x) "\x1B[31m" x "\x1B[00m" copy and paste it into the editor please. Note, that the your code is not highlighted properly.


1

A macro name currently defined cannot be redefined with a different definition (see below), so #undef allows that macro name to be redefined with a different definition. Here's the relevant legalese: Both C and C++ Standards (same wording): A macro definition lasts (independent of block structure) until a corresponding #undef directive is encountered ...


1

The predefined macro __DATE__ is what you need. Here is a SO question related to this. But maybe you want to use a code like this: const int daysToExpire = 14; NSString *compileDate = [NSString stringWithUTF8String:__DATE__]; NSDateFormatter *df = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init]; [df setDateFormat:@"MMM d yyyy"]; NSLocale *usLocale = ...


1

Make a file called include.cpp containing this: int f() { return 42; } Then, main.cpp (with inspiration from http://stackoverflow.com/a/25021520/4323): #include <iostream> #include "include.cpp" int main() { const char* const str = R"(include(include.cpp))" ; std::cout << str << '\n'; return f(); } What's that include() ...


1

I've worked on a project where we did something like this. We wrote a script to compile the code as C++, then linked our main target (our application) against the result. We then also include the code as a resource in the application or library we're building and read it from disk when we want to pass it to OpenGL as glsl. We did this in Xcode by having a ...


1

Macro usage is different from function invocation in one important aspect: macro arguments may be empty. This is valid: #define x(a,b) X a X b X x(,) //-> X X X x(1,) //-> X 1 X X x(,2) //-> X X 2 X Given that empty arguments are allowed, this macro usage: #define x(a) X a X x() //-> X X must be interpreted as an empty argument. While ...


1

First of all, this is incorrect and actually does the opposite of what it should: void *p; p = malloc(100); if (p) { perror("malloc"); return false; } This if statement says: if( malloc succeeded ){ return AN_ERROR; } It should say: void *p; p = malloc(100); if( NULL == p ) { perror("malloc"); return false; } Now as for your question: ...


1

Your problem likely arises from the fact that . is the macro variable terminator. It is normally optional, but if it exists it is used; and thus in cases where the next character is actually supposed to be . it should be doubled. As such, &library.&dataset. where &library = WORK and &dataset = TEST means you are asking for WORKTEST, not ...


1

You can circumvent the problem of non-symbol types like char * or struct point by defining new types with typedef. A better approach may be to pass the name of the new function to the macro as additional parameter. The problem of the comparison can be solved by passing the comparison criterion, as in the callback function of qsort that others have pointed ...



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