Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

Rather than an answer, it's a plead to all developers out there: please don't use macros like that. C++ offers template functions for these purposes. Remember that macros just substitute parameters rather than pre-evaluating them. Even if you add parentheses as samgak explained, this only fixes a half of the problem. Consider code like this: int x = 5; int ...


6

C++ already has std::min and std::max defined in <algorithm>. You can change your code to a pure C++ version #include <iostream> #include <algorithm> #include <limits> using namespace std; int main(int argc, char ** argv) { int N = 100; int * drop = new int[N + 1]; drop[0] = 0; drop[1] = drop[2] = 1; for (int i = ...


5

No; the result of a macro must be a complete grammar construct like an expression or an item. You absolutely cannot have random bits of syntax like a comma or a closing brace. You can get around this by simply not outputting anything until you have a complete, final expression. Behold! #![feature(trace_macros)] macro_rules! pascal_impl { /* The ...


5

Put brackets around the terms in your macros: #define min(a,b) ((a)<(b)?(a):(b)) #define max(a,b) ((a)>(b)?(a):(b)) As it is, this: drop[i] = min(drop[i], max(start, drop[i-start]+1)); is expanding to this (without brackets): drop[i] < start > drop[i-start]+1 ? start: drop[i-start]+1 ? drop[i] : start > drop[i-start]+1 ? start: ...


3

Macros are a simple text substitution mechanism. In your example, you have the following macro: #define f(a,b) a*b When you use that macro, the text a*b is substituted for the macro call, replacing a and b with whatever you used as parameters. In your first example, f(2*2,3*2) becomes 2*2*3*2, which does what you expect and outputs 24. However, in your ...


2

Your compiletime_assert framework is relying on the optimizer performing dead code elimination to remove the call to prefix ## suffix. This is highly fragile and is in no way guaranteed to work. Instead, try using one of the solutions from Ways to ASSERT expressions at build time in C - or, since you're using a modern compiler, just use C11 _Static_assert.


2

To add numbers in chunks of 32 bit you have to use the fact that add set the CF. So the low 32 bits are added as normal, the high ones are added with adc which include the carry flag in the addition. These macros should do %macro add_double 4 mov eax, %1 mov edx, %2 add eax, %3 adc edx, %4 %endmacro %macro add_doublev 2 mov eax, DWORD [%1] mov edx, DWORD ...


2

Your condition is being assessed as text. In a text comparison "10" < "4.05" since "1" < "4", just like "AZ" < "BB" due to "A" < "B". To flesh out @Reeza's comment, here is a sample macro that seems to work as expected. It's a whole lot of %sysevalf: %Macro testme(thresh,maxvif); %Do %until (%sysevalf(&maxvif > &thresh )); ...


2

Try the following. There are several tweaks: 1) I fixed the indenting. A matter of taste perhaps, but I find code hard to read if not logically indented. 2) I replaced the first two lines by Rows(1).Copy. There is no reason to select something in order to copy it (and 1 as an index is more idiomatic than "1:1") 3) The act of inserting the row completes ...


2

The macro recorder doesn't record what is actually happening in this case. The property you are looking for is SubAddress. Address is correctly set in your code. Create a hyperlink from a shape without selecting it You want to avoid selecting things in your code if possible, and in this case it definitely is. Create a shape variable and set it to the shape ...


2

Since the release of C++14, you can now use the [[deprecated]] attribute, independent of the compiler (so long as the compiler fully supports C++14, of course). In your case, you would use: [[deprecated]] typedef NewClassA OldClassA; // You can also include a message that will show up in the compiler // warning if the old name is used: ...


1

Let's decompile to see what GCC 4.8 does with it Without expect: #include "stdio.h" #include "time.h" int main() { /* Use time to prevent it from being optimized away. */ int i = !time(NULL); if (i) printf("%d\n", i); puts("a"); return 0; } Compile and decompile with GCC 4.8.2 x86_64 Linux: gcc -c -O3 -std=gnu11 main.c ...


1

If you're relying on a macro-paradise-only feature then yes, you do need to tell your users to add compiler plugins. See http://docs.scala-lang.org/overviews/macros/annotations.html . The projects you mention are only using the scala compiler's built-in (non-paradise) macro features, not macro annotations.


1

Here you go, I assume this is what you want to achieve and I assume you're using gcc: #include <stdio.h> #define MACRO_LIST( x ) \ MACRO(TEST1 ## x , TEST2 ## x ) \ MACRO(TEST3 ## x , TEST4 ## x ) #define MACRO_LIST_FULL \ MACRO_LIST( ) \ MACRO_LIST( ...


1

You are using Range variables which is good but you are then using Select which should be avoided. If you want to copy from Sheets("Sheet1").Range("C2:C6") and paste into Sheets("Sheet2").Range("C2:C6"), you can do this in one line of code. You do not need to loop through the cells for this: Sheets("Sheet1").Range("C2:C6").Copy Sheets("Sheet2").Range("C2") ...


1

Use the Application.OnTime method to schedule code that will run in one minute. Your code will look something like this (Untested): Sub CreateNewSchedule() Application.OnTime EarliestTime:=DateAdd("n", 1, Now), Procedure:="macro_name", Schedule:=True End Sub Sub macro_name() If Value > 10 Then SendEmail Else ...


1

I think you need to specifically process the application event stack with a DoEvents call. This allows user interactions with the spreadsheet to occur, where normally the macro would take precedence. You code would look something like: Do While True If Value > 10 Then SendEmail End If Sleep 60*CLng(1000) DoEvents Loop You ...


1

It's not supposed to do what you think it's supposed to do. If a min or max macro is defined, and the user wishes to call those std::min or std::max functions, it's the user's responsibility to make sure the macro is suppressed. Possibly again using BOOST_PREVENT_MACRO_SUBSTITUTION, possibly using parentheses ((std::min) (...)). All the use of ...


1

As far as I can tell the possible causes of this error are: The system located the file but could not load it. The file was loaded but it has no macros. The file was loaded but the macros are disabled. The file was loaded, macros exists... but you misspelled the name. Given the available information, it seems to be that the more likely cause is disabled ...


1

Is there any way so I can use a macro for passing a part of the arguments while the others are passed normally? No. Macro expansion is entirely textual and there are no mechanisms to suppress expansion of selected arguments. You could, however, define different macros to achieve a similar effect: #define PD13_2args GPIOD, GPIO_Pin_13 #define ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible