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48

an example $ echo "something" | mailx -s "subject" recipient@somewhere.com to send attachment $ uuencode file file | mailx -s "subject" recipient@somewhere.com and to send attachment AND write the message body $ (echo "something\n" ; uuencode file file) | mailx -s "subject" recipient@somewhere.com


16

You can use the "-r" option to set the sender address: mailx -r me@example.com -s ...


16

The usual way is to use uuencode for the attachments and echo for the body: (uuencode output.txt output.txt; echo "Body of text") | mailx -s 'Subject' user@domain.com


14

In case you also want to include your real name in the from-field, you can use the following format mailx -r "me@example.com (My Name)" -s "My Subject" ... If you happen to have non-ASCII characters in you name, like My AEÆoeøaaå (Æ= C3 86, ø= C3 B8, å= C3 A5), you have to encode them like this: mailx -r "me@example.com (My ...


9

The man page is a good place to start! Keep reading until you get to the MIME TYPES section, and pay close attention the following: Otherwise, or if the filename has no extension, the content types text/plain or application/octet-stream are used, the first for text or international text files, the second for any file that contains formatting ...


9

Here you are : echo "Body" | mailx -r "FROM_EMAIL" -s "SUBJECT" "To_EMAIL" PS. Body and subject should be kept within double quotes. Remove quotes from FROM_EMAIL and To_EMAIL while substituting email addresses.


9

The "-r" option is invalid on my systems. I had to use a different syntax for the "From" field. -a "From: Foo Bar <foo.bar@someplace.com>"


6

You need to quote $SUBJECT as you use it, i.e. mailx -s "$SUBJECT" $EMAIL < $MAILFILE Also there should be no space in SUBJECT="$VERSION script successful"


6

On debian where bsd-mailx is installed by default, the -r option does not work. However you can use mailx -s subject recipient@abc.com -- -f sender@abc.com instead. According to man page, you can specify sendmail options after --.


5

Solved it! There are 2 ways you can go about solving this. 1) Go over here and follow user - ndasusers answer. It will both create the keyN.db and certN.db files you need but also another one gmail ssl certificate that will solve another potential problem. 2) Or you can just copy the keyN.db and certN.db into a folder (/etc/ssl/cert maybe) and direct ...


5

Thank you for this it gave me a way to find an even better solution. Supposedly these keyN.db and certN.db are databases of trusted certificate authorities. I did a simple find / -name "cert*.db" to find where on my system has the keyN.db and certN.db files on my system (Fedora 20) I found the files under /etc/pki/nssdb/


5

It's easy, if your mailx command supports the -a (append header) option: $ mailx -a 'Content-Type: text/html' -s "my subject" user@gmail.com < email.html If it doesn't, try using sendmail: # create a header file $ cat mailheader To: user@gmail.com Subject: my subject Content-Type: text/html # send $ cat mailheader email.html | sendmail -t


4

Give this a shot: head -n 4 mail.txt | while read from to subject body; do mailx -s "$subject" -t "$to" -r "$from" <<< "$body" done head -n 4 reads up to four lines from your text file. read can read multiple variables from one line, so we can use named variables for readability. <<< is probably what you want for the redirection, ...


4

I got the similar problem recently and finally end up with a solution that is shorter: cat -v log/logfile.log | mail -s "here is a log file" "person@example.com" More details of the discussion of cat with mailx.


4

If you do not need to add more text and just need to send the content of $MSG, you can replace mail -s "$SUBJ" -q "$MSG" "$TO" with mail -s "$SUBJ" "$TO" < "$MSG" The EOT will be implicit in the < construct. -q is indeed only used to start a message. The rest is supposed to come through stdin.


3

uuencode is your friend. Here is a tested example: (uuencode .vimrc vimrc.txt; uuencode .zshrc zshrc.txt; echo Here are your attachments) | mailx -s 'Mail with attachments' email_address


3

I ended up going with an example using MIME::Lite found here use MIME::Lite; use Getopt::Std; my $SMTP_SERVER = 'smtp.server.com'; #change my $DEFAULT_SENDER = 'default@sender.com'; #change my $DEFAULT_RECIPIENT = 'default@recipient.com'; #change MIME::Lite->send('smtp', $SMTP_SERVER, Timeout=>60); my (%o, $msg); # process ...


3

I had some trouble to get my automatic email scripts to run after changing to Ubuntu Precise 12.04. I don't know, when Ubuntu (or Debian) exchanged bsd-mailx against heirloom-mailx, but the two "mail"-commands behave very differently. (E.g. heirloom uses -a for attachments, while it's used for additional headers in bsd.) In my case heirloom-mailx wasn't able ...


3

subprocess.call executes an executable. You are not passing a path to an executable as argument, you are passing a shell command line. To execute a shell command you have to explicitly state that you want to execute the command in a shell by passing shell=True in the argument list. Note that using shell=True with user-provided commands can be a securiy ...


2

You just need an extra | at the beginning: open $mail_fh, "|uuencode $attach $attach |mailx -m -s \"$subject\" -r $from $to";


2

Do you really want to use external binaries for either the uuencode or the mailx bit? UUencode is almost trivial with pack.


2

See attach_file in Email::Stuff, or Email::MIME if you need more control.


2

I wrote this ksh function a few years ago # usage: email_attachment to cc subject body attachment_filename email_attachment() { to="$1" cc="$2" subject="$3" body="$4" filename="${5:-''}" boundary="_====_blah_====_$(date +%Y%m%d%H%M%S)_====_" { print -- "To: $to" print -- "Cc: $cc" print -- "Subject: ...


2

If the problem is with uuencode...why cant you try mailx -a option which can also attach the files to the mail. Check this link for more info.


2

The above while loop works well as a simple alternative to sed and awk if you have a lot of control over how to display the lines of text in a file. the read command can use a specified delimiter as well, using the -d flag. Another simple example: I had used mysql to grab a list of users and hosts, putting it into a file /tmp/userlist with text as shown: ...


2

I recommend using scp which runs over SSH and thus far more secure than wget. You need to have an SSH server running to do this.


2

In my case, the script was called from cron where LC_* was not defined and accents were interpreted as "control chars". I just inserted the following lines at the beginning of my crontab file : LC_NAME=fr_FR.UTF-8 LC_ALL=fr_FR.UTF-8


2

Here are some ways of sending html type emails with mailx http://www.unix.com/unix-advanced-expert-users/37480-display-html-text-body-using-unix-mailx.html


2

use a file to mark the time you send. e.g. dowork() { tail -1 "/location/of/file.txt" | mail -s "Warning" test@testing.com; touch ./checked.txt } if [[ -f ./checked.txt ]] ; then if [[ $(expr $(date '+%s') - $(stat -c '%Y' ./checked.txt )) -gt 3600 ]]; then dowork fi else dowork fi



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