About

The tool called make is a build manager which compares the last modification times of various files and performs user specified actions (commands) when the "target" files are found to be older than their dependencies. Canonically it is used to build programs, but it can be used to manage any process that depends on the modification dates of files

make is a build manager which compares the last modification times of various files and performs user specified actions (commands) if the "target" files are found to be older than their dependencies. The make utility and the corresponding makefile format is standardized by POSIX.

Used in the canonical way, it rebuilds an executable program if one of its source files is newer than the current version of the executable. Many other uses are possible--limited only by the use of file modification times as the figure of merit for resolving what action to take.

The process need not be a single step as a whole cascade of actions can be triggered.

The input file for make is called a "makefile"; it defines the dependency graph and the work to be done to bring it up to date. A trivial makefile might look something like:

CC=gcc
LD=gcc

LDFLAGS=-lz
CFLAGS=-g -m -I/usr/local/lib

prog: prog.o
      $(LD) -o prog $(LDFLAGS) prog.o

prog.o: prog.c prog.h
    $(CC) -c $(CFLAGS) prog.c

This example specifies a two-step build process for compiling a program from its single source file and header file, linking against libz.

Complicated examples (and especially those generated by tools like autoconf) can be hundreds of lines long.

Features of make include

  • Variables
  • Patterned based rules which apply to a whole class of objects
  • A set of default rules which can significantly shorten makefiles
  • A declarative programming style of specifying the dependency graph melded with an imperative style of specifying commands.

Limitations of make

Make is not a configuration manager right out of the box. It assumes the presence of compilers with a predetermined name, that the libraries and special tool exist in known places, and so on and so forth. Therefore, building truly cross-platform software requires either extensive trickery in the makefile, or an external tool that probes the current environment and prepares a makefile compatible with the local environment from a template.

Versions of make

  • the original make was released in 1977
  • nmake
  • GNU make (often called gmake on systems that have more than one version installed) is probably the most common version today. GNU make supports extensive extensions to the original make language (to the point of deprecating major features of the original language in favor or more powerful replacements).

Other build manager and configuration managers

Other tools to perform the same or similar tasks include:

The whitespace "bug"

The make input language is white space sensitive: command lines must begin with a tab. This causes trouble when an editor automatically converts tabs to space (or vice versa), or a user accidentally inserts a space before the leading tab of an action line.

Legend has it that this bug was identified early on, but was not fixed because there were already [some small number like 20] users who might be inconvenienced by the change.

Interesting reading

See also

makefile

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