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0

Makefile obj-m := hello.o # Module Name is hello.c KDIR := /lib/modules/$(shell uname -r)/build all: $(MAKE) -C $(KDIR) M=$(PWD) modules clean: $(MAKE) -C $(KDIR) M=$(PWD) clean $(RM) Module.markers modules.order its not guaranteed that headers file will always be located in /usr/src directory, but it will surely be located ...


0

You have: $(MAKE) -C $(src) SUBDIR-$(PWD) modules But it seems like you want: $(MAKE) -C $(src)/SUBDIR-$(PWD) modules Or something along those lines; where does the source code live? You need to -C there.


1

Here are the differences. 1c1 < bool ReadImageToDatum(const string& filename, const int label, --- > bool ReadImageToDatum(string& filename, const int label, 3a4,8 > /* dalyac addition to read/follow symlink if symlink*/ > char buf[200]; > if (readlink(filename.c_str(), buf, 200) > 0) { ...


0

You have your manually added dependencies on the wrong targets. Recall what the atomic construct is doing. It is collapsing the set of original targets down to a single sentinel target and using that as a sequencing point. You are adding your prerequisites to the individual original targets (the exact thing the atomic workaround was designed to allow/fix ...


0

Failing tests generally means failing functionality. Of course, for something as large as PHP you may never touch that functionality. It may be that your best bet here is to search for the names of the tests which failed to see if anyone has had the same issue (and how to fix it or disable the functionality), and to find the source of the tests in PHP and ...


0

I've had a similar problem with my autoconf files when I upgraded my autoconf version. I noticed there is a bug report on the Debian list: Bug #752993 that seems related to this problem. So, it seems that we've hit a bug in the autoconf project. I've followed the workaround in the bug-report and that worked well for me. So, it meant that I removed the ...


0

When no makefile is present (or no rule exists in that makefile) make relies on a default built-in database of rules. Run make -p to get make to spit out all the rules it knows about (in the no makefile case that will be the default ones). When you look at that list you will find a pattern rule for building C source into object files or executables. Those ...


2

Use strcpy() since you don't want formatting (or strlcpy()/strcpy_s() for safety). Doubling the percent should work, and if you get the same error then that of course points at something being wrong in your build environment.


1

I assume you are talking about the cmake added messages from the make output (and not the normal make output itself) in which case it looks like those lines are hard-coded into the generated makefiles with arguments to the cmake cmake_echo_color command that include literal color names as arguments. So there don't appear to be any variables to override or ...


3

What about OUTPUT_WITH_RC := $(shell $(COMMAND); echo $$?) RETURN_CODE := $(lastword $(OUTPUT_WITH_RC)) OUTPUT := $(subst $(RETURN_CODE)QQQQ,,$(OUTPUT_WITH_RC)QQQQ) If your command fails, it will probably write to stderr; you can use this to capture everything: OUTPUT_WITH_RC := $(shell $(COMMAND) 2>$1; echo $$?)


1

If makefile_hello_py is the makefile whose contents you included in the question then you need to use the -f argument to tell make that' Your command line is telling make that it is a target to build. Try make -f makefile_hello_py hello_py.so.


0

typename has nothing to do here. It should only be used for dependent names. By removing typename and adding #include, it should compile (but not link since there is no main).


5

Add -lm at the end of your compilation (linker) line to link with the math library.


0

I eventually went with something like this as I felt the double $ was messy. define TEST_MACRO $(info B $(test_var)) endef # Note test_var was defined after TEST_MACRO test_var := test $(eval $(value TEST_MACRO)) This has the disadvantage that you can't set the $1..$n variables but it's easier to read. Edit - A better example of defining a ...


3

You haven't mentioned which version of Make you're using, and there are subtle differences between versions in the handling of macros. But this works for me (using GNUMake 3.81): define TEST_MACRO $(info A $(1)) test_var := $(1) $$(info B $$(test_var)) endef $(eval $(call TEST_MACRO,test))


0

Use relative path in Includes Direcories rather than variables. E.g. something like this ../../l/include.


0

Neither of those variables is 'standard' in either make or the Unix environment generally. That they're used in a makefile without being defined suggests that there is either some context missing for the makefile or (more likely) the makefile isn't very good. The two names are, however, at least similar to names that are often used. They usually mean much ...


1

These makefile conventions, as far as GNU is concerned are described at https://www.gnu.org/prep/standards/html_node/Makefile-Conventions.html#Makefile-Conventions. Thank you @Banther. I did not Google thoroughly enough.


1

Your dependencies for the various object files aren't of the form that Make's built-in compilation rules recognize. It wants a direct mapping of %.o: %.c. Add a VPATH for the indexed and graph directories, and then take those path components off the .c file names.


1

There isn't a solution to this problem as far as I'm aware. This is why the reason the 'Recursive Make Considered Harmful' paper was written in the first place. If you need inter-directory dependency relationships on an object level then you can't use per-directory Makefile:s this way. With per-directory makefile:s you only have manually synchronized ...


0

I think you've just downloaded the wrong driver. The one for the 2.6 kernel is here: http://www.silabs.com/Support%20Documents/Software/Linux_2.6.x_VCP_Driver_Source.zip hth


1

GNU make implicit rules use the variable $(CXX), and explicit rules usually follow this pattern. The default value is g++, but this can be overridden in the makefile or on the make command-line. Evidently, the default g++ on your system is 4.2. In addition to the two methods of overriding mentioned above, you could export CXX=g++-4.8 to your environment ...


0

Well, blow away any CMakeCache.txt you may have (cmake doesn't like changing compilers), and then do something like this: set CC=<location of gcc-4.8> set CXX=<location of g++4.8> Then run cmake again.. It should choose those compilers instead, and then MAke will use whatever CMake tells it too.


0

What i did, and i hope i'm right, was to define LINKER_SYMBOLS_HAVE_WIN32_STDCALL_ARG_SIZES as (0) in symtab.c. I think the constant is used when you are running it in CYGWING. And it compiled, now I expect it to work just fine.


1

In your Makefile.am, you can create a target named uninstall-hook which will delete your generated files: uninstall-hook: rm -f /etc/myapp/my_generated_file /etc/myapp/my_other_generated_file Or even: uninstall-hook: rm -rf /etc/myapp/


0

Example for C++ files. Also included a clean target .PHONY : clean CPPFLAGS= -fPIC -g LDFLAGS= -shared SOURCES = $(shell echo *.cpp) HEADERS = $(shell echo *.h) OBJECTS=$(SOURCES:.cpp=.o) FIKSENGINE_LIBDIR=../../../../lib FIKSENGINE_INCDIR=../../../../include TARGET=$(FIKSENGINE_LIBDIR)/tinyxml.so all: $(TARGET) clean: rm -f $(OBJECTS) $(TARGET) ...


1

Not tested (tell me if this does not work), but you could do something like this : compileall: program1 program2 program3 @echo "Compilation completed" program1: program1a @echo "Compiling $@" $(MAKE) -C $@ program1a program2 program3: @echo "Compiling $@" $(MAKE) -C $@ That way program1a should be built before program1 and make ...


0

To resolve, run aclocal, then automake in the top level directory before calling make. This will rebuild the makefiles using the installed version of autotools.


2

One way to do this is to :set autochdir (or one one of the other options: http://vim.wikia.com/wiki/Set_working_directory_to_the_current_file) so that :make will run in the same directory as the source file.


3

Interesting question. Although I do not have the opportunity to verify my answer because I do not have the environment set up to reproduce this, I will give it a try based on source code reading. For reference, the lines below are copied from the GNU make source file job.c. First of all, that code indicates when a command is executed directly and when it is ...


0

Make always prints the command after it expands it and before it sends it to the shell, unless you prefix the line with @. The output you see is exactly what make sends to the shell, which it sounds like is what you're looking for. Can you explain what information you're missing? If the problem is that you want to see the content hidden by the @ you will ...


0

You can .PHONY targets that are executed as first and last targets and print out the date all: echo "Component foo: build started" date $(MAKE) build echo "Component foo: build finished" date build: .... ....


0

You will have to install the command line tools for XCode. To do that open Xcode go to Xcode -> Preferences -> Downloads and add the component named Command Line Tools. This will place all relevant tools to your Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/usr/bin folder.


0

As http://www.scons.org/wiki/VariantDir%28%29 said, Note that when you're not using an SConscript file in the src subdirectory, you must actually specify that the program must be built from the build/hello.c file that SCons will duplicate in the build subdirectory. VariantDir('release','.',duplicate=0) env=Environment() ...


0

Yep, writing many targets in a rule is just shorthand for writing them out individually. b.bar1 b.bar2 : b.foo touch b.bar1 touch b.bar2 is exactly the same as b.bar1: b.foo touch b.bar1 touch b.bar2 b.bar2: b.foo touch b.bar1 touch b.bar2 Clearly wrong. You could write b.foo: touch b.foo b.bar1: b.foo touch b.bar1 ...


0

Two problems: First, you should never build the compiler in the source directory. It might appear to work, sometimes, but it's not supported and the compiler developers don't do that, so you shouldn't. Create an external obj directory, and build there: mkdir obj cd obj /path/to/src/configure ...blah...blah...blah Second, you missed a step: make make ...


0

Makefile A Makefile (usually with no file extension) is a configuration file used by the Unix make tool. Quoted from one of the best introductions I have found on Make that I highly recommend you read if you are interested in knowing more about make specifically, and task-runners in general. Make is the original UNIX build tool. It existed a long time ...


0

it seems like the feature has been in autotools for many years: ./configure --disable-werror unfortunately, i wasn't able to get the following specific case to work: ./configure --enable-wno-error=unused-value maybe it could work if one escaped '=' symbol, assuming it's possible. Like skim says, one can still use CFLAGS or CXXFLAGS.


1

I've ended up going with a hybrid approach from my original question and jml's answer (thanks for the inspiration!). TOOLS:=foo bar .PHONY: all all : $(TOOLS) .PHONY: install $(addprefix install_,$(TOOLS)) install : $(addprefix install_,$(TOOLS)) .PHONY: uninstall $(addprefix uninstall_,$(TOOLS)) uninstall : $(addprefix uninstall_,$(TOOLS)) define ...


1

as others have said, this is C code not C#. Anyhow, you have two errors (and they do not relate directly) to the makefile but rather your compilation environment and the code itself. OK, so how to approach something like this. First notice the first line in your screen-capture, that is the command that is being executed that is generating the error ...


1

There is a bug in CMakeLists.txt at line 13. (https://github.com/openglsuperbible/sb6code/blob/master/CMakeLists.txt) Change "elif (UNIX)" to "elseif (UNIX)",and it will be ok. Reference: https://www.opengl.org/discussion_boards/showthread.php/183902-SuperBible-6th-ed-Cannot-link-the-Linux-examples


1

The following hack worked for me, though it unfortunately relies on $(shell). # modify file names immediately PRE := $(shell rename : @COLON@ *) # example variables that I need XDLS = $(wildcard *.xdl) YYYS = $(patsubst %.xdl,%.yyy,$(XDLS)) # restore file names later POST = $(shell rename @COLON@ : *) wrapper: $(YYYS) @# restore file names $(POST) ...


1

b.bar1 b.bar2 : b.foo this rule tells make that there are two targets b.bar1 and b.bar2 both of which have a dependency on b.foo and both of which can be built by the listed rule. It does not tell make that they are related targets that get built by the same rule invocation. With GNU make you can tell make about the latter information by using a pattern rule ...


0

The source distribution of GNU make from the FSF download site is not technically supported on Cygwin. Not that there's any known reason why it shouldn't work, but it's not tested and last I heard the Cygwin guys were maintaining some extra patches to GNU make. So it doesn't surprise me that there are issues. Remember that you should only use the Cygwin ...


0

It sounds like you want an out of source build. There are a couple of ways you can create an out of source build. Do what you were doing, run cd /path/to/my/build/folder cmake /path/to/my/source/folder which will cause cmake to generate a build tree in /path/to/my/build/folder for the source tree in /path/to/my/source/folder. Once you've created it, ...


-2

I tried to follow your steps. Still no luck. But finally, I figure it out how to solve it. The step 10 still important and below is corrected step 10. create a dummy.c under (.bundle) project and the dummy.c can just totally empty. remove the setting for the library you want to link inside Link Binary With Libraries instead use ...


2

Make has a '-l' (--load-average) option. If you specify 'make -l 3', make will not launch additional jobs if there are already jobs running and the load is over 3. From the manpage: -l [load], --load-average[=load] Specifies that no new jobs (commands) should be started if there are others jobs running and the load average is at ...


0

replace make with your own script and add a "nice -n <>" command, so that higher the -jN, more the niceness. start a super-user process that does ps -u "user name" | grep make, and count the number of processes. use renice on the process ids make them in line, or any other algorithm you want


1

You can use subprocess or else import os os.system("make install") Some information about Calling an external command in Python


0

use subprocess to run other programs from Python.



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