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8

You should be passing str1, not &str1, to scanf(). scanf() expects a char * for the "%s" format; you pass the address of a char *. This does not lead to happiness. Since BUF_SIZE is so small — just 10, you say — you need to use: if (scanf("%9s", str1) != 1) …process error or EOF… This will protect you against buffer overflow. You should ...


4

You have several problems in your code: Don't read a string over the pointer, you meant scanf("%s", str1);, drop the &! Don't cast the return value of malloc() in C. Don't assume that allocations succeed. Don't use scanf() for this, it's very dangerous since you're not passing it any information about the available buffer size. It's better to use ...


4

Since malloc allocates space in bytes, and one integer is more than 1 byte wide, this buffer = (int*)malloc(n+1); should be buffer = malloc((n+1) * sizeof(int)); You should allocate space for n + 1 integers. So you must multiply it by the size of the type. A cleaner and more maintainable way to do it would be buffer = malloc((n + 1) * ...


4

The line you mention will compile fine in C++, save for that fact that if buffer is not a void *, then you may need to cast the return value of malloc in C++, which you don't need to do in C (and probably should not do). EG: uint32_t *buffer = (uint32_t *) malloc(sizeof(uint32_t)*CACHE_LEN*2); However, you may wish to convert to a new / delete paradigm; ...


3

op_temp is not a pointer, just a char value. You should write: char *op, *op_temp; or char* op; char* op_temp;


3

As per the man page of realloc() void *realloc(void *ptr, size_t size); so, the first argument should be a char *. OTOH, in your code, op = realloc(op, ++len); Here op is of type char *, which is valid. But op = realloc(op_temp, ++len); here op_temp is of type char. Change char *op, op_temp; to char *op = NULL, *op_temp = NULL;


2

A null-pointer return value from realloc may indicate either: That the function did not allocate storage. That the size parameter was zero and the memory was deallocated. Your code covers the first possibility, but not the second. A null return value can be valid, indicating that deallocation of a memory block completed succesfully. Signalling an error ...


2

I will try to make it simple let's suppose this is our memory ------------------------------------------------- | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | ------------------------------------------------- so after executing malloc() you are asking the system to give you space in order to use it for instance to store a table of 5 ints ...


2

Your freeing is ok, but you have a severe error timeptr = &time; return timeptr; you are returning the address of a local variable. The local variable is allocated in the stack frame of the function, and once the function returns, the data will no longer exist. You should use malloc for that too timeptr = malloc(sizeof(*timeptr)); and also you ...


2

struct map{ int map_width; int map_height; struct tile **tiles; }; ... m->tiles = malloc(sizeof(struct tile*)*height); for (i=0; i<height ; i++){ m->tiles[i] = malloc(sizeof(struct tile)*width); } explanatory notes Type **var_name = malloc(size*sizeof(Type *)); or Type **var_name = malloc(size*sizeof(*var_name));


2

Using a struct tile **tiles is sufficient. Think of it like this: struct tile_array *tiles would obviously suffice to point to an array of tile_array pointers. Now to avoid the additional struct replace tile_array with a pointer to a tile. As a result, you have a pointer to a pointer of type tile. The pointer to tile represents the beginning of an array of ...


2

The C standard guarantees that malloc will return memory suitably aligned for the most stringent fundamental type (for example uint64_t). If you have more stringent requirements you have to use aligned_alloc or something like it. 7.22.3 The pointer returned if the allocation succeeds is suitably aligned so that it may be assigned to a pointer to ...


2

sizeof(strlen(name)+1) is not correct, this gives you the size of the result of that calculation, i.e. sizeof(int). Because you have allocated the wrong size you are writing past the end of the buffer. This is corrupting data and causing free() to fail. What you mean to do is: sizeof(char) * (strlen(name) + 1) In C, sizeof(char) is guaranteed to be ...


2

I have never heard of that feature. If it weren't possible, though, you could still wrap them around some function which would accomplish that. Or, consider a memory analyzer (heap-user-after-free, memory leak, buffer overflow and so on) such as valgrind or AddressSanitizer.


2

Assuming that CACHE_LEN is indeed a macro that hides a value that is known at compile time: auto buffer = make_unique<array<uint32_t, CACHE_LEN*2>>(); This has the fun property that you get pretty much all the advantages of modern C++ at just about zero overhead. If you wish to stay somewhat closer to your C roots or CACHE_LEN is not known at ...


1

sizeof() gives the size in byte of the type given between the parenthesis. The type takes sizeof() in memory. This you need to know when you allocate memory to store data in. The CACHE_LEN * 2 depends solely on your usage. If you need to store five times a pair of uint32_t you use: malloc( sizeof( uint32_t ) * 2 * 5 ); malloc will allocate a fixed size ...


1

buffer = malloc(sizeof(uint32_t)*CACHE_LEN*2); This can be "translated" in C++ in several ways. But, first it must be clear what this does in C, since you wrote in your question that it's not clear for you the meaning of sizeof(uint32_t). Using malloc(), you can dynamically (i.e. at run-time) allocate some contiguous space from the heap. The parameter ...


1

for(i=0;i<40;i++) { /* Allocating memory to each pointers and later you write to this location */ mon->task[i] = malloc(size);/* If you have a initialized string then size = strlen(tempTask) + 1 */ } What you have is array of pointers and just access them and allocate memory to each of the pointers individually as shown above.


1

It's not necessarily slower. If the blocks are fixed sizes (or a limited range of sizes) or you in fact allocate and unallocate in a logical sequence (FIFO / FILO) you can often improve performance and memory management by handling a 'pool'. There is a boost library that implements which may or may not suit your needs. ...


1

There is at least one bug; this line: if (new_ptr != *ptr) invokes undefined behavior. Any use of the old pointer, especially comparison with the new one, after realloc succeeds, is forbidden. You need to make the assignment unconditionally. Further, while this is not an internal bug, the external API is misdesigned and error-prone. Often the type of ...


1

As a general point, you are asking SO to audit a 222 line program: If I were you, I'd not have confidence in any positive result I doubt this will be particularly well received as a question as it's not going to be of much use to any other reader. If you can't fit your code sensibly within the question, it probably isn't a good question.


1

std::vector<uint32_t> v(CACHE_LEN * 2); sizeof(type) return the size in chars of the type of the expression passed. For a uint32_t it would be 4.



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